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Science And The New Rehabilitation, Meghan J. Ryan Jan 2015

Science And The New Rehabilitation, Meghan J. Ryan

Faculty Scholarship

Rehabilitation’s making a comeback. Long thought to be an outdated approach to punishment, rehabilitation is reemerging in the wake of scientific advances. Not only have these advances in the fields of pharmacology, genetics, and neuroscience brought new rehabilitative possibilities, but the media’s communication of these advances to the general public have set the stage for rehabilitation’s reprise. The media constantly pummels the general public with reports of scientific breakthroughs like functional magnetic resonance imaging, prepping the public to be more accepting of deterministic viewpoints and to be more open to the possibility of transforming individuals. The rehabilitation ...


Finding Fault?: Exploring Legal Duties To Return Incidental Findings In Genomic Research, Elizabeth R. Pike, Karen H. Rothenberg, Benjamin E. Berkman Jan 2014

Finding Fault?: Exploring Legal Duties To Return Incidental Findings In Genomic Research, Elizabeth R. Pike, Karen H. Rothenberg, Benjamin E. Berkman

Faculty Scholarship

The use of whole genome sequencing in biomedical research is expected to produce dramatic advances in human health. The increasing use of this powerful, data-rich new technology in research, however, will inevitably give rise to incidental findings (IFs), findings with individual health or reproductive significance that are beyond the aims of the particular research, and the related questions of whether and to what extent researchers have an ethical obligation to return IFs. Many have concluded that researchers have an ethical obligation to return some findings in some circumstances, but have provided vague or context-dependent approaches to determining which IFs must ...


What Real-World Criminal Cases Tell Us About Genetics Evidence, Deborah W. Denno Jan 2013

What Real-World Criminal Cases Tell Us About Genetics Evidence, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

This Article, which is part of a symposium on "Law and Ethics at the Frontier of Genetic Technology," examines an unprecedented experimental study published in Science. The Science study indicated that psychopathic criminal offenders were more likely to receive lighter sentences if a judge was aware of genetic and neurobiological explanations for the offender’s psychopathy. This Article contends that the study’s conclusions derive from substantial flaws in the study’s design and methodology. The hypothetical case upon which the study is based captures just one narrow and unrepresentative component of how genetic and neurobiological information operates, and the ...


Dialogues, Dilemmas, And Disclosures: Genomic Research And Incidental Findings, Lynn W. Bush, Karen H. Rothenberg Mar 2012

Dialogues, Dilemmas, And Disclosures: Genomic Research And Incidental Findings, Lynn W. Bush, Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Genes And Plays: Bringing Elsi Issues To Life, Karen H. Rothenberg, Lynn W. Bush Feb 2012

Genes And Plays: Bringing Elsi Issues To Life, Karen H. Rothenberg, Lynn W. Bush

Faculty Scholarship

Ethical complexities surround the promise of genomic technology and the power of genetic information as they alter conceptions of identity and dynamics within personal and professional relationships. Creative approaches such as dramatic vignettes offer a unique analytical stage for imagining the bioethical past and future. Dramatic narratives can bring to life images of differing perspectives and values when experiencing innovations in medicine. Although the scientific landscape shifts, concerns expressed in theatre from 50 years ago parallel many contemporary ELSI (ethical, legal and social implications) issues, highlighting the ongoing struggle to appreciate the impact of emerging genetic technologies on relationships. To ...


Manipulating Fate: Medical Innovations, Ethical Implications, Theatrical Illuminations, Karen H. Rothenberg, Lynn W. Bush Jan 2012

Manipulating Fate: Medical Innovations, Ethical Implications, Theatrical Illuminations, Karen H. Rothenberg, Lynn W. Bush

Faculty Scholarship

Transformative innovations in medicine and their ethical complexities create frequent confusion and misinterpretation that color the imagination. Placed in historical context, theatre provides a framework to reflect upon how the ethical, legal, and social implications of emerging technologies evolve over time and how attempts to control fate through medical science have shaped -- and been shaped by -- personal and professional relationships. The drama of these human interactions is powerful and has the potential to generate fear, create hope, transform identity, and inspire empathy -- a vivid source to observe the complex implications of translating research into clinical practice through the lens of ...


From Eugenics To The "New" Genetics: "The Play's The Thing", Karen H. Rothenberg Jan 2010

From Eugenics To The "New" Genetics: "The Play's The Thing", Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

Genetics occupies a place in the public imagination with which few areas of science can compete. It is popularly understood to be the “science of life,” concerned with the essence of humanity: a subject that generates both awe and fear. These divergent emotions are encapsulated in the “promise versus peril” debate: the promise of an end to human disease is countered by the peril embodied in the discriminatory capacity of genetic essentialism. This debate has become ingrained in popular culture, and its dramatic potential has been effectively realized in theatre.

Plays have always been written and performed as expressions of ...


On Multi-View Learning With Additive Models, Mark Culp, George Michailidis, Kjell Johnson Jan 2009

On Multi-View Learning With Additive Models, Mark Culp, George Michailidis, Kjell Johnson

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Frequent Alterations Of Hmlh1 And Rbsp3/Hya22 At Chromosomal 3p22.3 Region In Early And Late-Onset Breast Carcinoma: Clinical And Prognostic Significance, Satyabrata Sinha, Ratnesh K. Singh, Neyaz Alam, Anup Roy, Susanta Roychoudhury, Chinmay Kumar Panda Jan 2008

Frequent Alterations Of Hmlh1 And Rbsp3/Hya22 At Chromosomal 3p22.3 Region In Early And Late-Onset Breast Carcinoma: Clinical And Prognostic Significance, Satyabrata Sinha, Ratnesh K. Singh, Neyaz Alam, Anup Roy, Susanta Roychoudhury, Chinmay Kumar Panda

Faculty Scholarship

Young age can be an independent prognostic factor for adverse prognosis in women with breast carcinoma (BC). In younger women, BC exhibited more aggressive pathological features than older women, indicating differences in biology. Frequent alterations in chromosomal (chr.) 3p22.3 in different malignancies indicated the existence of multiple candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) in this region, yet its association with BC remains unclear. In an effort to understand the differences in molecular pathogenesis in two age groups of BC, detailed analysis of alterations at chr.3p22.3 region was carried out in 47 early onset (group-A: 40 years) BC samples ...


Genome Structure And Emerging Evidence Of An Incipient Sex Chromosome In Populus, T. Yin, S. P. Difazio, L. E. Gunter, X. Zhang Jan 2008

Genome Structure And Emerging Evidence Of An Incipient Sex Chromosome In Populus, T. Yin, S. P. Difazio, L. E. Gunter, X. Zhang

Faculty Scholarship

The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region ...


Bad Nature, Bad Nurture, And Testimony Regarding Maoa And Slc6a4 Genotyping In Murder Trials, Nita A. Farahany, William Bernet, Cindy L. Vnencak-Jones, Stephen A. Montgomery Jan 2007

Bad Nature, Bad Nurture, And Testimony Regarding Maoa And Slc6a4 Genotyping In Murder Trials, Nita A. Farahany, William Bernet, Cindy L. Vnencak-Jones, Stephen A. Montgomery

Faculty Scholarship

Recent research—in which subjects were studied longitudinally from childhood until adulthood—has started to clarify how a child’s environment and genetic makeup interact to create a violent adolescent or adult. For example, male subjects who were born with a particular allele of the monoamine oxidase A gene and also were maltreated as children had a much greater likelihood of manifesting violent antisocial behavior as adolescents and adults. Also, individuals who were born with particular alleles of the serotonin transporter gene and also experienced multiple stressful life events were more likely to manifest serious depression and suicidality. This research ...


The Scarlet Gene: Behavioral Genetics, Criminal Law, And Racial And Ethnic Stigma, Karen H. Rothenberg, Alice Wang Mar 2006

The Scarlet Gene: Behavioral Genetics, Criminal Law, And Racial And Ethnic Stigma, Karen H. Rothenberg, Alice Wang

Faculty Scholarship

Imagine that a scientist from the state university asks you and your family to participate in a study on a particular gene variant associated with alcoholism. The project focuses on your ethnic group, the Tracy Islanders, who have a higher incidence of alcoholism, as well as a higher incidence of the gene variant, than the general population. You will not be informed whether you have the gene variant, but your participation in the study might help scientists develop drugs to help individuals control their addiction to alcohol. You have a family history of alcoholism, and you are concerned that your ...


Undesirable Implications Of Disclosing Individual Genetic Results To Research Participants, Leslie Meltzer Henry Jan 2006

Undesirable Implications Of Disclosing Individual Genetic Results To Research Participants, Leslie Meltzer Henry

Faculty Scholarship

The bioethics and legal community are divided over whether investigators who conduct biomedical research are ethically and/or legally obligated to disclose incidental genetic findings to research participants. This paper argues that the justification for disclosure rests on the mistaken view that principles of beneficence, respect, reciprocity, and/or justice require researchers to offer participants individual genetic results. Whereas these principles and others obligate physicians to share individually relevant results with patients with whom they share a fiduciary relationship in the clinical care setting, they do not similarly obligate investigators to share such information with participants in the research setting ...


Revisiting The Legal Link Between Genetics And Crime, Deborah W. Denno Jan 2006

Revisiting The Legal Link Between Genetics And Crime, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

Unwarranted constraints on the admissibility of genetics evidence in death penalty cases can undercut some defendants' efforts to fight their executions. For example, genetics evidence can help validate some traditionally accepted mitigating factors (such as certain psychiatric or behavioral disorders) that can otherwise be difficult for defendants to prove. By imposing unreasonable limitations on genetics arguments, the criminal justice system may be undermining the very principles and progressive thinking the cap on genetics evidence was originally intended to achieve. Part II of this article briefly reviews the facts and legal arguments in Mobley v. State. Part III addresses the primary ...


Behavioural Genetics In Criminal Cases: Past, Present And Future, Nita A. Farahany, William Bernet Jan 2006

Behavioural Genetics In Criminal Cases: Past, Present And Future, Nita A. Farahany, William Bernet

Faculty Scholarship

Researchers studying human behavioral genetics have made significant scientific progress in enhancing our understanding of the relative contributions of genetics and the environment in observed variations in human behavior. Quickly outpacing the advances in the science are its applications in the criminal justice system. Already, human behavioral genetics research has been introduced in the U.S. criminal justice system, and its use will only become more prevalent. This essay discusses the recent historical use of behavioral genetics in criminal cases, recent advances in two gene variants of particular interest in the criminal law, MAOA and SLC6A4, the recent expert testimony ...


When Should Judges Admit Or Compel Genetic Tests?, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg Oct 2005

When Should Judges Admit Or Compel Genetic Tests?, Diane E. Hoffmann, Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Navigating Uncharted Waters: Intellectual Property Rights Surrounding Genomics Research & Development Information, Lawrence M. Sung Jan 2003

Navigating Uncharted Waters: Intellectual Property Rights Surrounding Genomics Research & Development Information, Lawrence M. Sung

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


What Makes Genetic Discrimination Exceptional?, Deborah Hellman Jan 2003

What Makes Genetic Discrimination Exceptional?, Deborah Hellman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Unblazed Trail: Bioinformatics And The Protection Of Genetic Knowledge, Lawrence M. Sung Jan 2002

The Unblazed Trail: Bioinformatics And The Protection Of Genetic Knowledge, Lawrence M. Sung

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Consent To The Use Of Stored Dna For Genetics Research: A Survey Of Attitudes In The Jewish Population, Marc D. Schwartz, Karen H. Rothenberg, Linda Joseph, Judith Benkendorf, Caryn Lerman Apr 2001

Consent To The Use Of Stored Dna For Genetics Research: A Survey Of Attitudes In The Jewish Population, Marc D. Schwartz, Karen H. Rothenberg, Linda Joseph, Judith Benkendorf, Caryn Lerman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Privacy In Genetics Research, Barbara Fuller, Mary Jo Ellis Kahn, P. A. Barr, L. Biesecker, E. Crowley, J. Garber, M. K. Mansoura, Patricia Murphy, J. Murray, J. Phillips, Karen H. Rothenberg, Mark Rothstein, J. Stopfer, Gary Swergold, B. Weber, Francis Collins, Kathy Hudson Aug 1999

Privacy In Genetics Research, Barbara Fuller, Mary Jo Ellis Kahn, P. A. Barr, L. Biesecker, E. Crowley, J. Garber, M. K. Mansoura, Patricia Murphy, J. Murray, J. Phillips, Karen H. Rothenberg, Mark Rothstein, J. Stopfer, Gary Swergold, B. Weber, Francis Collins, Kathy Hudson

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Cancer Genetic Susceptibility Testing: Ethical And Policy Implications For Future Research And Clinical Practice, Benjamin S. Wilfond, Karen H. Rothenberg, Elizabeth J. Thomson, Caryn Lerman Oct 1997

Cancer Genetic Susceptibility Testing: Ethical And Policy Implications For Future Research And Clinical Practice, Benjamin S. Wilfond, Karen H. Rothenberg, Elizabeth J. Thomson, Caryn Lerman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Genetic Information And The Workplace: Legislative Approaches And Policy Challenges, Karen H. Rothenberg, Barbara Fuller, Mark Rothstein, Troy Duster, Mary Jo Ellis Kahn, Rita Cunningham, Beth Fine, Kathy Hudson, Mary-Claire King, Patricia Murphy, Gary Swergold, Francis Collins Mar 1997

Genetic Information And The Workplace: Legislative Approaches And Policy Challenges, Karen H. Rothenberg, Barbara Fuller, Mark Rothstein, Troy Duster, Mary Jo Ellis Kahn, Rita Cunningham, Beth Fine, Kathy Hudson, Mary-Claire King, Patricia Murphy, Gary Swergold, Francis Collins

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Genetic Information And Health Insurance: State Legislative Approaches, Karen H. Rothenberg Apr 1995

Genetic Information And Health Insurance: State Legislative Approaches, Karen H. Rothenberg

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Human Biology And Criminal Responsibility: Free Will Of Free Ride ?, Deborah W. Denno Jan 1988

Human Biology And Criminal Responsibility: Free Will Of Free Ride ?, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

This Comment presents three major arguments concerning biological deficiency defenses, using, respectively, a critique of biosocial science research, a statistical model of biological and sociological data, and an examination of theories and philosophies on causation and behavior. First, this Comment argues that there should be no defense to mitigate criminal responsibility except in the less that one percent of cases eligible for the insanity defense. Second, this Comment argues that social science research has not successfully demonstrated sufficiently strong links between biological factors and criminal behavior to warrant major consideration in determining criminal responsibility. Third, this Comment demonstrates that no ...