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Talking Vs. Communicating, Ken Margolies Jul 2006

Talking Vs. Communicating, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] There is a saying, "When all is said and done, more is said than done." Stewards who attend union meetings to decide how to handle and issue or grievance sessions with management probably agree. Why is it so difficult to get past the talk and make decisions, agreements, and well, get things done?


Leading For The Bottom Line: A View Of Leadership In A Bottom-Line Context, Gary S. Fields , Cory Stern Mar 2006

Leading For The Bottom Line: A View Of Leadership In A Bottom-Line Context, Gary S. Fields , Cory Stern

CAHRS Working Paper Series

This paper sets out to establish and describe a new approach to leadership called Bottom Line Leadership. The essence of Bottom Line Leadership is that a leader’s most critical responsibility is to clearly identify, communicate and gain buy-in for the ultimate bottom-line objective of the organization he/she leads, subject to constraints imposed by the market and by the organization itself. In comparison to other leadership models that focus on the general attributes or behaviors characterizing effective leaders, Bottom Line Leadership emphasizes the link between an organization’s purpose and a leader’s behavior. The philosophy that serves as ...


Communicating Across Cultures, Ken Margolies Sep 2005

Communicating Across Cultures, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Communication is the key to so many things a steward does, and good communication skills are something experienced stewards develop. But even experienced stewards have special challenges when the communication is between people of different cultures.


Working It Out, Ken Margolies Jul 2003

Working It Out, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Every steward knows that it’s almost always better to work out problems with management informally, without having to resort to filing a grievance. And ever steward knows that if you do have to file a grievance, it’s better to win it at the first step than have to go through the headaches that come with moving higher up the food chain, or, even worse, risk leaving things in the hands of an arbitrator.


Robo The Steward, Ken Margolies Jan 2003

Robo The Steward, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Some years ago a science fiction movie featured Robocop, the perfect police officer. He had super-human abilities and a set of prime directives to govern his approach to the job. It got me thinking: What if there was a Robosteward? What abilities do you think he or she (or it?) should have? Here are some possibilities


In There Or Up Front? : An Introduction To Bottom-Line Human Resource Management, Gary S. Fields Apr 2002

In There Or Up Front? : An Introduction To Bottom-Line Human Resource Management, Gary S. Fields

CAHRS Working Paper Series

This essay explains to managers and academics a new approach to human resource management, what I call “Bottom-Line Human Resource Management.” Bottom-line human resource management starts by positing clear organizational goals, and in this way differs from strategic human resource management, which starts with analysis of the organization’s human resource strategy.

Organizational goals are easily classified; managers cannot manage well unless they know which class of organization they are working in.

Not all decisions have right and wrong answers but some do. Managers will earn a seat at the table if they are able to make correct decisions in ...


Goal Orientation And Ability: Interactive Effects On Self-Efficacy, Performance, And Knowledge, Bradford S. Bell, Steve W.J. Kozlowski Jan 2002

Goal Orientation And Ability: Interactive Effects On Self-Efficacy, Performance, And Knowledge, Bradford S. Bell, Steve W.J. Kozlowski

Faculty Publications - Human Resource Studies

This study examined the direct relationship of goal orientation – and the interaction of goal orientation and cognitive ability -- with self-efficacy, performance, and knowledge in a learning context. The current paper argues that whether a particular type of goal orientation is adaptive or not adaptive depends on individuals' cognitive ability. Results indicated that the direct associations of learning and performance orientations were consistent with previous research. Learning orientation was positively related to self-efficacy, performance, and knowledge, while performance orientation was negatively related to only one outcome, performance. The interactions between goal orientation and ability also supported several hypotheses. As expected, learning ...


Creative Problem Solving, Ken Margolies Jan 2002

Creative Problem Solving, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Sometimes solutions to difficult problems are simple, if you think creatively. Here are three true stories of how stewards used their creativity to resolve workplace problems.


The Steward’S Role In Bargaining, Ken Margolies Sep 2001

The Steward’S Role In Bargaining, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Bargaining a new contract is one of the biggest events in the life of a union, and one that offers stewards many opportunities to build a stronger organization. For many stewards, though, the bargaining process consists of responding the three big questions from the members.


Uniting A Divided Workforce, Ken Margolies Jul 2001

Uniting A Divided Workforce, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Keeping your co-workers united and focused on common goals, ready to respond and act as a solid force I confronted by a management threat to wages, benefits or conditions, is a big part of a steward’s job – and one of the most difficult. Here are three big causes of disunity, and some tips on how to get members past them.


Representing Difficult People, Ken Margolies May 2000

Representing Difficult People, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Few stewards would argue that most of their union work flows directly from problems with management. Contract misinterpretations and outright violations, thoughtless supervision, paperwork foulups and a million other things go wrong all the time, adding up to a real handful for stewards. That’s why it can be such a frustration when some of your most difficult problems come not from management, but from your own ranks.


Creative Pressure Tactics, Ken Margolies Sep 1998

Creative Pressure Tactics, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Saul Alinsky, a great labor and community organizer, once said that “tactics that drag on become a drag.” Stewards know that tactics used too often can lose their effectiveness and burn members out. That’s why wise stewards are always looking for new and creative ways to put pressure on an employer. Here are some ideas that have worked for other unionists.


Time Management For Stewards, Ken Margolies Jan 1998

Time Management For Stewards, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Too much to do? Too little time to do it? Stewards face that problem every day – and the smart ones do something about it. It’s called time management.


Building Membership Participation, Ken Margolies May 1997

Building Membership Participation, Ken Margolies

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Membership involvement is important to help fight for good contracts, organize new members, and solve problems on the job. But most workers aren’t born union activists, and many don’t think their participation makes much difference. To convince them to get involved we have to show them that their participation will be worthwhile – and may even be enjoyable.


Achieving National Economic And Social Goals: The Counterproductive Role Of Post-1965 Immigration Policy, Vernon M. Briggs Jr. Sep 1995

Achieving National Economic And Social Goals: The Counterproductive Role Of Post-1965 Immigration Policy, Vernon M. Briggs Jr.

CAHRS Working Paper Series

[Excerpt] Immigration is a discretionary policy of every nation state. No citizen of any foreign nation has a right to enter any other country for the purpose of permanent settlement or for employment just because he or she wishes to do so. The opportunities and the conditions under which they may enter are legally prescribed. Hence, in the contemporary case of the United States, it is the nation's immigration policy that is the source of the conflict with the national interest, not the actions of those who, as individuals, are merely availing themselves of its terms and opportunities.


Human Resources: Key To Competitive Advantage, Thomas F. Cummings, Steven Marcus Oct 1994

Human Resources: Key To Competitive Advantage, Thomas F. Cummings, Steven Marcus

CAHRS Working Paper Series

[Excerpt] As difficult as it may be and as fuzzy as it may turn out, we all must invest in an attempt to peer into the future to discern what implications it has for our human resources. It is not a precise effort, and it certainly can be challenged from many quarters; however, it is not only noble, but may prove to be extremely worthwhile for a competitive firm. As with almost every organization activity, the competitive world makes a paradigm shift inevitable for the human resource function. Understanding the nature of that shift and how to implement meaningful change ...


International Migration And Labor Mobility: The Receiving Countries, Vernon M. Briggs Jr. Aug 1994

International Migration And Labor Mobility: The Receiving Countries, Vernon M. Briggs Jr.

CAHRS Working Paper Series

[Excerpt] Throughout the ascendancy of mankind, migration has been among the most distinguishing behavioral characteristics of the human species. The noted historian William McNeill, in describing the pre-modern experience, has written that "it is safe to assume that when our ancestors first became fully human they were already migratory" because they were already hunters and, he adds, that "no dominant species ever spread so far so fast" as have human beings.1 From these early times until the modern era, there was little concern about how migrants might be received wherever they arrived. If the land area was unoccupied, the ...


Immigration And The U.S. Labor Market: Public Policy Gone Awry, Vernon M. Briggs Jr. Oct 1992

Immigration And The U.S. Labor Market: Public Policy Gone Awry, Vernon M. Briggs Jr.

CAHRS Working Paper Series

[Excerpt] One of the least discussed, yet most significant influences upon contemporary economic affairs in the United States, has been the post-1965 revival of mass immigration.