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Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing Of Plant-Based Blends Using Graded Levels Of High Protein Fermented Soybean Meal (Fsbm), Parisa Fallahi, Kurt A. Rosentrater, K. Muthukumarappan Jan 2019

Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing Of Plant-Based Blends Using Graded Levels Of High Protein Fermented Soybean Meal (Fsbm), Parisa Fallahi, Kurt A. Rosentrater, K. Muthukumarappan

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Fast-paced growth in global aquaculture has elevated concerns about the high costs of fish farming production and potential water pollution. Thus, finding eco-friendly and more sustainable alternative protein sources for fish diets is of vital importance to the industry. A twin-screw extrusion processing study was performed using three ingredient blends formulated with graded levels of high protein fermented soybean meal (FSBM) (0, 80% and 100% db fishmeal replacement) along with calculated amounts of other ingredients to meet the rainbow trout diets’ requirements. Increasing the FSBM content from 0% to 100% resulted in a substantial increase in brightness, greenness, and yellowness ...


The Effect Of Five Biomass Cropping Systems On Soil-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Across A Topographic Gradient, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore, Matthew J. Helmers, Randall K. Kolka Sep 2017

The Effect Of Five Biomass Cropping Systems On Soil-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Across A Topographic Gradient, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore, Matthew J. Helmers, Randall K. Kolka

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Understanding the environmental impact of bioenergy crops is needed to inform bioenergy policy development. We determined the effects of five biomass cropping systems—continuous maize (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max)-triticale (Triticosecale ×)/soybean-maize, maize-switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), triticale/sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and triticale-aspen (Populus alba × P. grandidentata)—on soil-saturated hydraulic conductivity (K S ) across a toposequence in central Iowa, USA. We compared data from the time of cropping system establishment in 2009 to 4 years post-establishment. Both our 2009 and 2013 data confirmed that cropping system impacts on K S vary by landscape position. We found that differences in cropping system ...


Development Of Single-Seed Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Predictions Of Corn And Soybean Constituents Using Bulk Reference Values And Mean Spectra, Paul R. Armstrong, Jasper G. Tallada, Charles R. Hurburgh Jr., David F. Hildebrand, James E. Specht Jan 2011

Development Of Single-Seed Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Predictions Of Corn And Soybean Constituents Using Bulk Reference Values And Mean Spectra, Paul R. Armstrong, Jasper G. Tallada, Charles R. Hurburgh Jr., David F. Hildebrand, James E. Specht

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Rapid, non-destructive single-seed compositional analyses are useful for many areas of crop science, including breeding and genetics. Seeds are sometimes unique and require preservation due to small samples, which necessitates development of methods for total non-destructive measurement. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used for non-destructive single-seed composition prediction, but the reference methods used to develop prediction models are usually destructive. Reference methods are costly, and extensive sets of seeds must be used to obtain prediction models for multiple constituents. In this research, single-seed NIRS prediction models were developed for common constituents of soybeans and corn using composition values from ...


Effects Of Full, Abbreviated, And No Clean-Outs On Commingled Grain During Combine Harvest, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe Jan 2011

Effects Of Full, Abbreviated, And No Clean-Outs On Commingled Grain During Combine Harvest, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Growers of identity-preserved crops desire to keep grain separate throughout the production process. Earlier research has demonstrated that some locations in a combine such as cleaning and threshing areas harbor relatively smaller amounts of grain, but require relatively large amounts of time to clean. Omitting clean-out in some areas and flushing residual grain with new grain in the first grain tank full may lower commingled grain concentration to acceptable levels for some customers.


Grain Residuals And Time Requirements For Combine Cleaning, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick Jan 2009

Grain Residuals And Time Requirements For Combine Cleaning, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Emerging identity-preserved grain markets depend on avoidance of commingling grain at harvest. Knowledge of where grain resides in a combine, cleaning labor requirements, and resulting purity levels would assist producers. Measurements were made of grain and other material residing in different areas of rotary- and cylinder-type combines in replicated clean-outs during corn and soybean harvest and also in preliminary clean-outs during oat harvest. Concentration of the prior (i.e., commingled) grain was measured in the first grain harvested of the subsequent crop.


Nozzle And Carrier Application Effects On Control Of Soybean Leaf Spot Diseases, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf Jan 2009

Nozzle And Carrier Application Effects On Control Of Soybean Leaf Spot Diseases, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Increased soybean foliar disease potential has heightened grower interest in fungicide application techniques. Application field trials comparing application rate [187 vs. 112 L/ha (20 vs. 12 gal/acre)], nozzle style (twin-orifice; single-orifice) and spray quality (fine vs. medium and coarse spray quality), and application technique (with and without air-assist) along with an unsprayed check were done at two locations over two years. Fungicide deposition (coverage and droplet size) and disease severity in the bottom, middle, and top parts of the plant canopy, and soybean yield were measured.


Technical Notes: Aspiration Cleaning Of Soybeans, Charles R. Hurburgh Jr., Jeff Buresch, Glen R. Rippke Jan 1996

Technical Notes: Aspiration Cleaning Of Soybeans, Charles R. Hurburgh Jr., Jeff Buresch, Glen R. Rippke

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Soybean samples containing 0.5 to 4.0% foreign material and 3 to 22% splits were aspiration cleaned at air velocities of 19 m/s (3500 ft/min) and 10 m/s (1970 ft/min). Both airflow rates removed 80% of the total non-soybean material, and removed similar amounts of splits. The high airflow rate removed 1.1% of whole soybeans compared to 0.4% at low airflow rate. At either airflow rate, the aspirator removed less saleable material and more non-grain material than previously reported for screen cleaning. Aspiration could be an acceptable method for meeting reduced foreign material ...