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Iowa State University

Soybean

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

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Techno-Economic Modeling Of A Degummed Soybean Oil Biorefinery In 2005 & 2012, Bailley A. Richardson, Kurt A. Rosentrater Jul 2013

Techno-Economic Modeling Of A Degummed Soybean Oil Biorefinery In 2005 & 2012, Bailley A. Richardson, Kurt A. Rosentrater

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

As the biofuels industry expands, it is important to identify and quantize potential capital, operational, material, and utility costs, as well as possible sales prices for the biofuels and coproducts. Many industries use computer simulation programs for this function, as well as to see how using different operations can affect the overall production at the plant. The objective of this project was to determine how various operation scenarios affected capital, operational, material, and utility costs of a biodiesel biorefinery. These costs were examined using a techno-economic modeling program for a degummed soybean oil plant. It was clear after seeing economic ...


Impact Of Fertilizer Application Timing On Drainage Nitrate Levels, Reid D. Christianson, Matthew J. Helmers, Carl H. Pederson, Peter A. Lawlor Jun 2009

Impact Of Fertilizer Application Timing On Drainage Nitrate Levels, Reid D. Christianson, Matthew J. Helmers, Carl H. Pederson, Peter A. Lawlor

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Nitrate loss from drainage systems in Iowa and other upper Midwestern states is a concern relative to local water supplies as well as the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. As a result, there is a need to quantify how various nitrogen management practices impact nitrate loss. One practice that is commonly mentioned as a potential strategy to reduce nitrate loss is to vary fertilizer application timing and specifically apply nitrogen as close to when the growing crop needs it as possible. At a site in Gilmore City, Iowa, a number of fertilizer timing and rate schemes within a ...


Combine Effects On Commingling And Residual Grain, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick Feb 2007

Combine Effects On Commingling And Residual Grain, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Emerging identity-preserved grain markets depend on avoidance of commingling grain at harvest. Knowledge of where grain resides in a combine, cleaning labor requirements, and resulting purity levels would assist producers. Measurements were made of grain and other material residing in different areas of rotary- and cylinder-type combines in replicated clean-outs during corn and soybean harvest and also in preliminary clean-outs during oat harvest. Concentration of the prior (i.e. commingled) grain was measured in the first grain harvested of the subsequent crop.

Total material remaining in the combine ranged from 84 to 186 lb, 61% of which was whole grain ...


Nozzle And Carrier Application Effects On Control Of Soybean Leaf Spot Diseases, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf Jan 2007

Nozzle And Carrier Application Effects On Control Of Soybean Leaf Spot Diseases, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

A two-site, two-year field application experiment investigated fungicide coverage in a fully-developed soybean canopy. Application treatments included “high-rate” (187 l/ha; 20 gal/acre) and “low-rate” (112 l/ha;12 gal/acre) with fine-droplet two-orifice tips, medium-droplet two-orifice tip at 187 l/ha (20 gal/acre), a coarse-droplet single-orifice “herbicide-style” tip at 168 l/ha (18 gal/ac), and an air-assisted spray treatment. Droplet coverage and size, and foliar disease severity in the lower, middle, and top parts of the plant canopy, and crop yield were measured.

Droplet size generally followed expected manufacturer specifications. Percentage area covered and drops/cm ...


Effects Of Nozzle Type And Carrier Application On The Control Of Leaf Spot Diseases Of Soybean, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf Jan 2006

Effects Of Nozzle Type And Carrier Application On The Control Of Leaf Spot Diseases Of Soybean, H. Mark Hanna, Alison E. Robertson, W. Mark Carlton, Robert E. Wolf

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Midwestern soybean growers seek information on effective application of foliar fungicides that do not translocate throughout the plant. Field application treatments included using a two-orifice nozzle tip producing fine droplets at 187 l/ha (20 gal/ac) and 112 l/ha (12 gal/ac) and a single-orifice nozzle tip producing a coarse droplet size more typical of herbicide applications at 168 l/ha (18 gal/ac). In addition an air-assisted sprayer was used at one of the two sites of the trials. Measurements included droplet size, droplet coverage, and foliar disease severity in the top, middle, and lower parts of ...


Grain Residuals And Time Requirements For Combine Cleaning, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick Jan 2006

Grain Residuals And Time Requirements For Combine Cleaning, H. Mark Hanna, Darren H. Jarboe, Graeme R. Quick

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Emerging identity-preserved grain markets depend on avoidance of commingling grain at harvest. Knowledge of where grain resides in a combine, cleaning labor requirements, and resulting purity levels would assist producers. Measurements were made of grain and other material residing in different areas of rotary- and cylinder-type combines in replicated clean-outs during corn and soybean harvest and also in preliminary clean-outs during oat harvest. Concentration of the prior (i.e. commingled) grain was measured in the first grain harvested of the subsequent crop.

Total material remaining in the combine ranged from 84 to 186 lb, 61% of which was whole grain ...