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Iowa State University

Soybean

Genetics

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Using Genomic And Gene Expression Methods To Understand The Phenotypic Response Of Soybean To Sudden Death Syndrome Caused By Fusarium Virguliforme, Alexander Stephen Luckew Jan 2018

Using Genomic And Gene Expression Methods To Understand The Phenotypic Response Of Soybean To Sudden Death Syndrome Caused By Fusarium Virguliforme, Alexander Stephen Luckew

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most important soybean diseases in the Midwestern United States, leading to average losses of $396 million per year from 1996 to 2015. The causal agent of SDS, soilborne fungus Fusarium virguliforme (Fv), causes root rot symptoms and releases phytotoxins taken up by the plant to produce chlorosis and necrosis in the leaves. The main management practice used to reduce the impact of SDS is planting resistant soybean cultivars. Resistance to SDS is known to be quantitative with 88 known quantitative trait loci (QTL) based on Soybase.org. Many of these QTL ...


Functional Characterization Of A Fungal Polyamine Oxidase Fvpo1, Jordan Lillian Baumbach Jan 2018

Functional Characterization Of A Fungal Polyamine Oxidase Fvpo1, Jordan Lillian Baumbach

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Soybean is an important source of protein and oil for both human and animal nutrition. The United States is the world’s leading soybean producing nation. In 2016, the U.S. soybean production was valued over 40.9 billion dollars. Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is ranked as one of the top ten yield limiting disease of soybean and is caused by the pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. Fusarium virguliforme is a soil borne fungal pathogen, which infects soybean roots resulting in both root sot symptoms and foliar chlorosis and necrosis. To date there is no known single gene resistance to ...


Genetic Architecture Of Antibiosis And Antixenosis Aphid Resistance In Soybean And Elucidation Of The Molecular Effect Of Pyramiding Rag1 And Rag2 Resistance Genes, Martha Ibore Jan 2017

Genetic Architecture Of Antibiosis And Antixenosis Aphid Resistance In Soybean And Elucidation Of The Molecular Effect Of Pyramiding Rag1 And Rag2 Resistance Genes, Martha Ibore

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Soybean aphids are a major problem to soybean growers worldwide and they cause great yield losses. In the United States, soybean aphids can cause yield losses of up to 50% especially on susceptible varieties. Yield losses attributed to feeding by soybean aphids can be reduced by cultivating resistant soybean varieties. In recent years, certain biotypes of soybean aphids that can colonize resistant soybean plants have been reported, suggesting the continued need for identification of novel sources of aphid resistance to include in plant breeding programs. While gene pyramiding, in which certain resistant soybean genotypes carry more than one aphid resistance ...


Molecular Characterization Of Short And Long Term Iron Stress Responses In Soybean, Leorrie Ann Atencio Jan 2016

Molecular Characterization Of Short And Long Term Iron Stress Responses In Soybean, Leorrie Ann Atencio

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (IDC) is a disease caused by lack of useable iron in the soil. Symptoms include stunting and interveinal chlorosis of the leaves, eventually leading to yield loss at the end of the season. IDC is particularly important in the upper Midwestern United States because soil conditions favor its development. With the use of next generation sequencing approaches, we characterized soybeans’ short and long-term response to iron stress. Our research takes advantage of two near isogenic lines that are 98% genetically identical but differ in their iron efficiency response. Clark plants are iron efficient, while Isoclark plants are ...


Identification And Characterization Of Brown Stem Rot Resistance In Soybean, Chantal Elaine Mccabe Jan 2016

Identification And Characterization Of Brown Stem Rot Resistance In Soybean, Chantal Elaine Mccabe

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Breeding for pathogen resistance is an important objective to improve and protect soybean yields. In 2010, 14.4% of total soybean yield was suppressed by diseases. Brown stem rot (BSR), caused by the fungus Phialophora gregata, reduces yield by as much as 38%. To date, three dominant BSR resistance genes have been identified: Rbs1, Rbs2, and Rbs3. The objectives of my research were 1) to determine if plant introductions contained novel BSR resistance genes, 2) to determine the correlation between P. gregata hyphae growth and foliar symptoms as well as characterize the response of the three BSR resistance genes to ...


Investigation Of The Arabidopsis Nonhost Resistance Mechanism Against The Soybean Pathogen, Phytophthora Sojae, Rishi Sumit Jan 2013

Investigation Of The Arabidopsis Nonhost Resistance Mechanism Against The Soybean Pathogen, Phytophthora Sojae, Rishi Sumit

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Nonhost resistance (NHR) provides immunity to all members of a plant species against all isolates of a microorganism that is pathogenic to other plant species. Three Arabidopsis thaliana PEN (penetration deficient) genes, PEN1, 2 and 3 have been shown to provide prehaustorial NHR against the barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant is penetrated by the hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae that causes root and stem rot disease in soybean. The P. sojae susceptible (pss) 1 mutant is infected by both P. sojae and the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme that causes sudden death syndrome in soybean ...


Marker-Assisted Selection For Elevated Concentrations Of The Α′ Subunit Of Β-, Sheilah Emilie Oltmans-Deardorff Jan 2012

Marker-Assisted Selection For Elevated Concentrations Of The Α′ Subunit Of Β-, Sheilah Emilie Oltmans-Deardorff

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] contains two major storage proteins, glycinin and β-conglycinin (BC). Glycinin accounts for approximately 40% and BC approximately 25% of total soybean seed protein (Nielsen et al., 1989). Glycinin is controlled by five genes coding for the acidic (A) and basic (B) subunits: Gy1, Gy2, Gy3, Gy4, and Gy5 (Cho et al., 1989; Nielsen et al., 1989). BC consists of gene families that encode the three major subunits α, α′, and β. The relative concentrations of the BC subunits are about 45% α, 35% α′, and 20% β (Maruyama et al., 1999). Soybean cultivars were discovered ...


Analysis Of Iron Transporters In The Soybean (Glycine Max (L.) Merr.) Genome, Dan Stribe Jan 2012

Analysis Of Iron Transporters In The Soybean (Glycine Max (L.) Merr.) Genome, Dan Stribe

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Iron plays a significant role in numerous cellular functions. Improved uptake and efficiency of use can have strong positive effects on the health of plants, animals and humans. Major players in iron homeostasis are the Iron-Regulated Transporters (IRT). The purpose of this research is to identify putative Iron-Regulated Transporter genes in soybean, structurally characterize these genes and examine their relational phylogeny. Additionally, gene sequence data and gene expression patterns will be considered to differentiate each gene's potential role in iron homeostasis of soybean. In this study, we identified fourteen soybean gene models with significant predicted protein similarity to A ...