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Iowa State University

Soybean

Entomology

2015

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Reduced Fitness Of Virulent Aphis Glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Biotypes May Influence The Longevity Of Resistance Genes In Soybean, Adam J. Varenhorst, Michael T. Mccarville, Matthew E. O'Neal Sep 2015

Reduced Fitness Of Virulent Aphis Glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Biotypes May Influence The Longevity Of Resistance Genes In Soybean, Adam J. Varenhorst, Michael T. Mccarville, Matthew E. O'Neal

Entomology Publications

Sustainable use of insect resistance in crops require insect resistance management plans that may include a refuge to limit the spread of virulence to this resistance. However, without a loss of fitness associated with virulence, a refuge may not prevent virulence from becoming fixed within a population of parthenogenetically reproducing insects like aphids. Aphid-resistance in soybeans (i.e., Rag genes) prevent outbreaks of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines), yet four biotypes defined by their capacity to survive on aphid-resistant soybeans (e.g., biotype-2 survives on Rag1 soybean) are found in North America. Although fitness costs are reported for biotype-3 on aphid ...


Survey Of Soybean Insect Pollinators: Community Identification And Sampling Method Analysis, K. A. Gill, M. E. O'Neal Jun 2015

Survey Of Soybean Insect Pollinators: Community Identification And Sampling Method Analysis, K. A. Gill, M. E. O'Neal

Entomology Publications

Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, flowers can be a source of nectar and pollen for honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), wild social and solitary bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea), and flower-visiting flies (Diptera). Our objectives were to describe the pollinator community in soybean fields, determine which sampling method is most appropriate for characterizing their abundance and diversity, and gain insight into which pollinator taxa may contact soybean pollen. We compared modified pan traps (i.e., bee bowls), yellow sticky traps, and sweep nets for trapping pollinators in Iowa soybean fields when soybeans were blooming (i.e., reproductive stages R1–R6 ...