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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

1974

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Research Notes: Iowa State University And United States Department Of Agriculture, Reid G. Palmer, Hollys E. Heer, J. Lackey, D. Isely, Monica Sheridan Apr 1974

Research Notes: Iowa State University And United States Department Of Agriculture, Reid G. Palmer, Hollys E. Heer, J. Lackey, D. Isely, Monica Sheridan

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

In 1968 Walter R. Fehr, Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, observed sterile plants in a single plant progeny row of the cultivar 'Hark'. Further analyses by Fehr indicated that sterility existed in both sexes and that it was a recessive genetic trait (Fehr, personal communication, 1970). The current research effort began in 1970.


Research Notes: Kobe University, Tadao Nagata Apr 1974

Research Notes: Kobe University, Tadao Nagata

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Pod dehiscence or shattering is an agronomic character of importance in breeding soybeans adaptable to machinery cultivation. Caviness (1969) had presented heritability estimation of pod dehiscence in four crosses between varieties in the United States and the wild soybean, and the values in broad sense in F2 generation were very high (over 90%). The author (Nagata, 1974) has reported results of observations of pod dehiscence under 40 different conditions with special regard to the moisture contents of plant parts, especially of seeds, and concluded that pod dehiscence was affected greatly by environment and year with reference to the meteorological conditions.


Research Notes: Iwate University, Norihiko Kaizuma, Juro Fukui Apr 1974

Research Notes: Iwate University, Norihiko Kaizuma, Juro Fukui

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Japanese cultivated soybeans (G.max (L.) Merrill) have been known as protein-rich. However, as the world protein malnutrition problem has been urged to be solved, the development of much higher protein strains is considered to be an indispensable task for soybean breeders. Since the hybridizations of G.max x G.soja (= G.ussuriensis) by Williams (1948) and Weber (1950), G. soja has been regarded as a promising protein gene source in breeding of the G. max varieties with high protein.


Research Notes: University Of Nevada, B. K. Vig Apr 1974

Research Notes: University Of Nevada, B. K. Vig

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Glycine max (L.) Merrill (soybean) is said to have at least 18 loci responsible for the development of chlorophyl (Bernard and Cremeens, 1970). One of these, y11, discovered by Weber and Weiss (1959), is characterized by the development of golden yellow color of the leaves and stem in homozygous (y11 y11 ) combination. The heterozygous plants are light green and differ from the y11y11 homozygotes which have normal, dark green color.


Research Notes: United States Department Of Agriculture And Plant Disease Research Laboratory, K. R. Bromfield Apr 1974

Research Notes: United States Department Of Agriculture And Plant Disease Research Laboratory, K. R. Bromfield

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Almost all of the soybeans grown in Australia are found in Queensland and New South Wales, with very minor acreages in northern Victoria . The area sown to soybean in 1973 was about 28,350 hectares in Queensland and about 8,100 hectares in New South Wales. Important growing areas in Queensland include The Darling Downs; the South Burnett region (Kingaroy, Nanango, Wondai, Murgon); the Lockyer, Fassifern and Brisbane River Valleys; the Atherton Tablelands; and the region around Bundaberg .


Genetic Stocks Available, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Genetic Stocks Available, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Research Notes: University Of Wisconsin, S. L. Kimball, G. L. Cutter, W. D. Beversdorf, E. T. Bingham Apr 1974

Research Notes: University Of Wisconsin, S. L. Kimball, G. L. Cutter, W. D. Beversdorf, E. T. Bingham

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Tissue culture methods may benefit soybean breeders if whole plants can be differentiated from aneuploid, mutated, fused, or haploid cells. However, in order to realize this potential, it must be possible to derive plantlets from previously undifferentiated tissues - and ultimately from masses of callus cells. This report summarizes the information we obtained concerning adventitious budding from soybean tissues (Kimball and Bingham, 1973), early stages of embryo formation within masses of callus cells, and actual differentiation of plantlets from callus tissue.


Research Notes: Agriculture Canada And United States Department Of Agriculture, R. I. Buzzel, R. L. Bernard, B. R. Buttery Apr 1974

Research Notes: Agriculture Canada And United States Department Of Agriculture, R. I. Buzzel, R. L. Bernard, B. R. Buttery

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

In an increase plot of foundation seeds of Harosoy in 1957 at Urbana, a number of Harosoy-type plants were found with flowers of a deeper red than the normal purple (P). The color is best described as magenta (M). This mutant was added to the Genetic Type Collection as T235.


Report Of Soybean Genetics Committee, R. L. Bernard, R. I. Buzzel, R. L. Cooper, H. H. Hadley, E. E. Hartwig, K. Hinson, R. G. Palmer Apr 1974

Report Of Soybean Genetics Committee, R. L. Bernard, R. I. Buzzel, R. L. Cooper, H. H. Hadley, E. E. Hartwig, K. Hinson, R. G. Palmer

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Research Notes: Kasetsart University, Sumin Smutkupt Apr 1974

Research Notes: Kasetsart University, Sumin Smutkupt

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Seeds of S.J.2, a Thai soybean variety, were treated with gamma rays of a cobalt source in five different doses: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 krad, respectively. In M2 generation , yellow seedlings appeared in the treated materials, with the frequency ranging from 0.20 to 0.70%. Two different types of yellow seedlings were observed.


Genetic Stocks Desired, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Genetic Stocks Desired, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Announcements, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Announcements, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Research Notes: G. B. Pant University Of Agriculture And Technology, B. B. Singh, S. C. Gupta, B. D. Singh Apr 1974

Research Notes: G. B. Pant University Of Agriculture And Technology, B. B. Singh, S. C. Gupta, B. D. Singh

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

One M3 progeny row of irradiated 'Lee' soybean (20 kr gamma rays) showed segregation for leaf crinkling. From a total of 12 plants in this progeny row, two showed severe crinkling and puckering of leaves. It looked as if these plants were suffering from viral disease.


Index Of Contributors, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Index Of Contributors, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Mailing List, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Mailing List, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Recent Soybean Genetics And Breeding Publications, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Recent Soybean Genetics And Breeding Publications, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Research Notes: Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Shin Han Kwon Apr 1974

Research Notes: Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Shin Han Kwon

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Wide variations of locally grown farmers' varieties were observed in Korea. The majority of varieties currently grown by fanners are unnamed and succeeded from their ancestors. The gene collection is urgently needed for the present varietal improvement and also to prevent the erosion of gene sources built up many centuries in this land.


Soybean Genetics Newsletter, Soybean Genetics Newsletter Apr 1974

Soybean Genetics Newsletter, Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Research Notes: Agriculture Canada, R. I. Buzzel, B. R. Buttery, J. H. Haas Apr 1974

Research Notes: Agriculture Canada, R. I. Buzzel, B. R. Buttery, J. H. Haas

Soybean Genetics Newsletter

Nine flavonol glycosides occur in various soybean cultivars with gene t1 resulting in kaempferol and T1 controlling the presence of quercetin plus kaempferol (Buttery and Buzzell, 1973). The sugars of these glycosides have been identified and four flavonol glycoside genes have been studied (Buzzell and Buttery, 1973, and unpublished). A monoglucoside is the basic glycoside; it is present even when the four genes are recessive.