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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Domestication

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Evolutionary Conservation And Divergence Of Gene Coexpression Networks In Gossypium (Cotton) Seeds, Jonathan F. Wendel, Guanjing Hu, Ran Hovav, Corrinne E. Grover, Adi Faigenboim-Doron, Noa Kadmon, Justin T. Page, Joshua A. Udall Jan 2016

Evolutionary Conservation And Divergence Of Gene Coexpression Networks In Gossypium (Cotton) Seeds, Jonathan F. Wendel, Guanjing Hu, Ran Hovav, Corrinne E. Grover, Adi Faigenboim-Doron, Noa Kadmon, Justin T. Page, Joshua A. Udall

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

The cotton genus (Gossypium) provides a superior system for the study of diversification, genome evolution, polyploidization, and human-mediated selection. To gain insight into phenotypic diversification in cotton seeds, we conducted coexpression network analysis of developing seeds from diploid and allopolyploid cotton species and explored network properties. Key network modules and functional associations were identified related to seed oil content and seed weight. We compared species-specific networks to reveal topological changes, including rewired edges and differentially coexpressed genes, associated with speciation, polyploidy, and cotton domestication. Network comparisons among species indicate that topologies are altered in addition to gene expression profiles, indicating ...


Initiation And Early Development Of Fiber In Wild And Cultivated Cotton, Kara M. Butterworth, Dean C. Adams, Harry T. Horner, Jonathan F. Wendel Jun 2009

Initiation And Early Development Of Fiber In Wild And Cultivated Cotton, Kara M. Butterworth, Dean C. Adams, Harry T. Horner, Jonathan F. Wendel

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Cultivated cotton fiber has undergone transformation from short, coarse fibers found in progenitor wild species to economically important, long, fine fibers grown globally. Morphological transformation requires understanding of development of wild fiber and developmental differences between wild and cultivated fiber.We examined early development of fibers, including abundance and placement on seed surface, nucleus position, presence of vacuoles, and fiber size and shape. Four species were studied using microscopic, morphometric, and statistical methods: Gossypium raimondii (wild D genome), Gossypium herbaceum (cultivated A genome), Gossypium hirsutum (wild tetraploid), and Gossypium hirsutum (cultivated tetraploid). Early fiber development is highly asynchronous in G ...