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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Chloroplast DNA

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A New Species Of Cotton From Wake Atoll,Gossypium Stephensii(Malvaceae), Jonathan F. Wendel, Joseph P. Gallagher, Corrinne E. Grover, Kristen Rex, Matthew Moran Jan 2017

A New Species Of Cotton From Wake Atoll,Gossypium Stephensii(Malvaceae), Jonathan F. Wendel, Joseph P. Gallagher, Corrinne E. Grover, Kristen Rex, Matthew Moran

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Wake Atoll is an isolated chain of three islets located in the Western Pacific. Included in its endemic flora is a representative of the genus Gossypium colloquially referred to as Wake Island cotton. Stanley G. Stephens pointed out that “Wake Island cotton does not resemble closely either the Caribbean or other Pacific forms.” Taking into consideration morphological distinctions, the geographic isolation of Wake Atoll, and newly generated molecular data presented here, we conclude that the cottons of Wake Atoll do in fact represent a new species of Gossypium, here named Gossypium stephensii. This name is chosen to commemorate the eminent ...


Use Of Nuclear Genes For Phylogeny Reconstruction In Plants, Randall L. Small, Richard Clark Cronn, Jonathan F. Wendel Jan 2004

Use Of Nuclear Genes For Phylogeny Reconstruction In Plants, Randall L. Small, Richard Clark Cronn, Jonathan F. Wendel

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Molecular data have had a profound impact on the field of plant systematics, and the application of DNA-sequence data to phylogenetic problems is now routine. The majority of data used in plant molecular phylogenetic studies derives from chloroplast DNA and nuclear rDNA, while the use of low-copy nuclear genes has not been widely adopted. This is due, at least in part, to the greater difficulty of isolating and characterising low-copy nuclear genes relative to chloroplast and rDNA sequences that are readily amplified with universal primers. The higher level of sequence variation characteristic of low-copy nuclear genes, however, often compensates for ...