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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Biological invasions

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Dominant Native And Non‐Native Graminoids Differ In Key Leaf Traits Irrespective Of Nutrient Availability, Arthur A. D. Broadbent, Jennifer Firn, James M. Mcgree, Elizabeth T. Borer, Yvonne M. Buckley, W. Stanley Harpole, Kimberly J. Komatsu, Andrew S. Macdougall, Kate H. Orwin, Nicholas J. Ostle, Eric W. Seabloom, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Maria C. Caldeira, Nico Eisenhauer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Joslin L. Moore, Carla Nogueira, Pablo L. Peri, Anita C. Risch, Christine Roscher, Martin Schütz, Carly J. Stevens Jan 2020

Dominant Native And Non‐Native Graminoids Differ In Key Leaf Traits Irrespective Of Nutrient Availability, Arthur A. D. Broadbent, Jennifer Firn, James M. Mcgree, Elizabeth T. Borer, Yvonne M. Buckley, W. Stanley Harpole, Kimberly J. Komatsu, Andrew S. Macdougall, Kate H. Orwin, Nicholas J. Ostle, Eric W. Seabloom, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Maria C. Caldeira, Nico Eisenhauer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Joslin L. Moore, Carla Nogueira, Pablo L. Peri, Anita C. Risch, Christine Roscher, Martin Schütz, Carly J. Stevens

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Aim: Nutrient enrichment is associated with plant invasions and biodiversity loss. Functional trait advantages may predict the ascendancy of invasive plants following nutrient enrichment but this is rarely tested. Here, we investigate (a) whether dominant native and non-native plants differ in important morphological and physiological leaf traits, (b) how their traits respond to nutrient addition, and (c) whether responses are consistent across functional groups.

Location: Australia, Europe, North America and South Africa.

Time period: 2007–2014.

Major taxa studied: Graminoids and forbs.

Methods: We focused on two types of leaf traits connected to resource acquisition: morphological features relating to light-foraging ...


Spreaders, Igniters And Burning Shrubs: Plant Flammability Explains Novel Fire Dynamics In Grass-Invaded Deserts, Andres Fuentes-Ramirez, Joseph W. Veldman, Claus Holzapfel, Kirk A. Moloney Jan 2016

Spreaders, Igniters And Burning Shrubs: Plant Flammability Explains Novel Fire Dynamics In Grass-Invaded Deserts, Andres Fuentes-Ramirez, Joseph W. Veldman, Claus Holzapfel, Kirk A. Moloney

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Novel fire regimes are an important cause and consequence of global environmental change that involve interactions among biotic, climatic, and human components of ecosystems. Plant flammability is key to these interactions, yet few studies directly measure flammability or consider how multiple species with different flammabilities interact to produce novel fire regimes. Deserts of the southwestern USA are an ideal system for exploring how novel fire regimes can emerge when fire-promoting species invade ecosystems comprised of species that did not evolve with fire. In these deserts, exotic annual grasses provide fuel continuity across landscapes that did not historically burn. These fires ...