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Artificial Soils To Assess Temperature Sensitivity Of The Decomposition Of Model Organic Compounds: Effects Of Chemical Recalcitrance And Clay-Mineral Composition, James W. Raich, Jiaoping Zhang, Thomas E. Loynachan Dec 2011

Artificial Soils To Assess Temperature Sensitivity Of The Decomposition Of Model Organic Compounds: Effects Of Chemical Recalcitrance And Clay-Mineral Composition, James W. Raich, Jiaoping Zhang, Thomas E. Loynachan

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Understanding the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is important to predict the response of soil carbon (C) dynamics to projected global warming. There is no consensus, however, as to whether or not the decomposition of recalcitrant soil C is as sensitive to temperature as is that of labile soil C. Soil C is stabilized by three mechanisms: chemical recalcitrance, mineral interaction and physical accessibility. We used artificial soils with controlled compositions to assess the effects of chemical recalcitrance (cellulose compared with lignin) and clay-mineral composition with montmorillonite (M) or kaolinite (K) on the decomposition of model organic ...


Productivity Is A Poor Predictor Of Plant Species Richness, Peter B. Adler, Eric W. Seabloom, Elizabeth T. Borer, Helmut Hillebrand, Yann Hautler, Andy Hector, W. Stanley Harpole, Lydia R. O'Halloran, James B. Grace, T. Michael Anderson, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori A. Biederman, Cynthia S. Brown, Yvonne M. Buckley, Laura B. Calabrese, Cheng-Jin Chu, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott L. Collins, Kathryn L. Cottingham, Michael J. Crawley, Ellen I. Damschen, Kendi F. Davies, Nicole M. Decrappeo, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Paul N. Frater, Eve I. Gasarch, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, Janneke Hillerislambers, Hope Humphries, Virginia L. Jin, Adam Kay, Kevin P. Kirkman, Julia A. Klein, Johannes M. H. Knops, Kimberly J. La Pierre, John G. Lambrinos, Wei Li, Andrew S. Macdougall, Rebecca L. Mcculley, Brett A. Melbourne, Charles E. Mitchell, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent D. Mortensen, John L. Orrock, Suzanne M. Prober, David A. Pyke, Anita C. Risch, Martin Schuetz, Melinda D. Smith, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren K. Sullivan, Gang Wang, Peter D. Wragg, Justin P. Wright, Louie H. Yang Sep 2011

Productivity Is A Poor Predictor Of Plant Species Richness, Peter B. Adler, Eric W. Seabloom, Elizabeth T. Borer, Helmut Hillebrand, Yann Hautler, Andy Hector, W. Stanley Harpole, Lydia R. O'Halloran, James B. Grace, T. Michael Anderson, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori A. Biederman, Cynthia S. Brown, Yvonne M. Buckley, Laura B. Calabrese, Cheng-Jin Chu, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott L. Collins, Kathryn L. Cottingham, Michael J. Crawley, Ellen I. Damschen, Kendi F. Davies, Nicole M. Decrappeo, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Paul N. Frater, Eve I. Gasarch, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, Janneke Hillerislambers, Hope Humphries, Virginia L. Jin, Adam Kay, Kevin P. Kirkman, Julia A. Klein, Johannes M. H. Knops, Kimberly J. La Pierre, John G. Lambrinos, Wei Li, Andrew S. Macdougall, Rebecca L. Mcculley, Brett A. Melbourne, Charles E. Mitchell, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent D. Mortensen, John L. Orrock, Suzanne M. Prober, David A. Pyke, Anita C. Risch, Martin Schuetz, Melinda D. Smith, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren K. Sullivan, Gang Wang, Peter D. Wragg, Justin P. Wright, Louie H. Yang

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

For more than 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating local diversity. The original view, which is still widely accepted, holds that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity. Although recent meta-analyses questioned the generality of hump-shaped patterns, these syntheses have been criticized for failing to account for methodological differences among studies. We addressed such concerns by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found no clear relationship between productivity and fine-scale (meters−2 ...


Abundance Of Introduced Species At Home Predicts Abundance Away In Herbaceous Communities, Jennifer Firn, Joslin L. Moore, Andrew S. Macdougall, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Janneke Hillerislambers, W. Stanley Harpole, Elsa E. Cleland, Cynthia S. Brown, Johannes M. H. Knops, Suzanne M. Prober, David A. Pyke, Kelly A. Farrell, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lydia R. O'Halloran, Peter B. Adler, Scott L. Collins, Carla M. D'Antonio, Michael J. Crawley, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Brett A. Melbourne, Yann Hautier, John W. Morgan, Andrew D. B. Leakey, Adam Kay, Rebecca L. Mcculley, Kendi F. Davies, Carly J. Stevens, Chengjin Chu, Karen D. Holl, Julia A. Klein, Philip A. Fay, Nicole Hagenah, Kevin P. Kirkman, Yvonne M. Buckley Mar 2011

Abundance Of Introduced Species At Home Predicts Abundance Away In Herbaceous Communities, Jennifer Firn, Joslin L. Moore, Andrew S. Macdougall, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Janneke Hillerislambers, W. Stanley Harpole, Elsa E. Cleland, Cynthia S. Brown, Johannes M. H. Knops, Suzanne M. Prober, David A. Pyke, Kelly A. Farrell, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lydia R. O'Halloran, Peter B. Adler, Scott L. Collins, Carla M. D'Antonio, Michael J. Crawley, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Brett A. Melbourne, Yann Hautier, John W. Morgan, Andrew D. B. Leakey, Adam Kay, Rebecca L. Mcculley, Kendi F. Davies, Carly J. Stevens, Chengjin Chu, Karen D. Holl, Julia A. Klein, Philip A. Fay, Nicole Hagenah, Kevin P. Kirkman, Yvonne M. Buckley

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites – grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community ...