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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

2005

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Maintaining Tree Islands In The Florida Everglades: Nutrient Redistribution Is The Key, Paul R. Wetzel, Arnold G. Van Der Valk, Susan Newman, Dale E. Gawlik, Tiffany Troxler Gann, Carlos A. Coronado-Molina, Daniel L. Childers, Fred H. Sklar Sep 2005

Maintaining Tree Islands In The Florida Everglades: Nutrient Redistribution Is The Key, Paul R. Wetzel, Arnold G. Van Der Valk, Susan Newman, Dale E. Gawlik, Tiffany Troxler Gann, Carlos A. Coronado-Molina, Daniel L. Childers, Fred H. Sklar

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

The Florida Everglades is an oligotrophic wetland system with tree islands as one of its most prominent landscape features. Total soil phosphorus concentrations on tree islands can be 6 to 100 times greater than phosphorus levels in the surrounding marshes and sloughs, making tree islands nutrient hotspots. Several mechanisms are believed to redistribute phosphorus to tree islands: subsurface water flows generated by evapotranspiration of trees, higher deposition rates of dry fallout, deposition of guano by birds and other animals, groundwater upwelling, and bedrock mineralization by tree exudates. A conceptual model is proposed, in which the focused redistribution of limiting nutrients ...


Phylogeny Of The New World Diploid Cottons (Gossypium L., Malvaceae) Based On Sequences Of Three Low-Copy Nuclear Genes, Inés Álvarez, Richard Clark Cronn, Jonathan F. Wendel May 2005

Phylogeny Of The New World Diploid Cottons (Gossypium L., Malvaceae) Based On Sequences Of Three Low-Copy Nuclear Genes, Inés Álvarez, Richard Clark Cronn, Jonathan F. Wendel

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

American diploid cottons (Gossypium L., subgenus Houzingenia Fryxell) form a monophyletic group of 13 species distributed mainly in western Mexico, extending into Arizona, Baja California, and with one disjunct species each in the Galapagos Islands and Peru. Prior phylogenetic analyses based on an alcohol dehydrogenase gene (AdhA) and nuclear ribosomal DNA indicated the need for additional data from other molecular markers to resolve phylogenetic relationships within this subgenus. Toward this end, we sequenced three nuclear genes, the anonymous locus A1341, an alcohol dehydrogenase gene (AdhC), and a cellulose synthase gene (CesA1b). Independent and combined analyses resolved clades ...