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Iowa State University

Agricultural Science

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No Evidence That Bacillus Thuringiensis Genes And Their Products Influence The Susceptibility Of Corn Residue To Decomposition, R. Michael Lehman, Shannon L. Osborne, Kurt A. Rosentrater Nov 2008

No Evidence That Bacillus Thuringiensis Genes And Their Products Influence The Susceptibility Of Corn Residue To Decomposition, R. Michael Lehman, Shannon L. Osborne, Kurt A. Rosentrater

Kurt A. Rosentrater

The possibility that Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn (Zea mays L.) residues resist decomposition compared to non-Bt residues would present direct (soil carbon turnover times) and indirect (changes in tillage practices) effects on carbon budgets in agricultural systems. We evaluated the relative decomposition of residue from two pairs of Bt and non-Bt corn hybrids from different seed manufacturers buried in the root zone of adjacent Bt and non-Bt corn plots over a period of 384 d. We found no persistent differences in residue decomposition among the different hybrids regardless of the seed manufacturer or the presence of the Bt genes (both ...


No Differences In Decomposition Rates Observed Between Bacillus Thuringiensis And Non-Bacillus Thuringiensis Corn Residue Incubated In The Field, R. Michael Lehman, Shannon L. Osborne, Kurt A. Rosentrater Jan 2008

No Differences In Decomposition Rates Observed Between Bacillus Thuringiensis And Non-Bacillus Thuringiensis Corn Residue Incubated In The Field, R. Michael Lehman, Shannon L. Osborne, Kurt A. Rosentrater

Kurt A. Rosentrater

Recent speculation of slower residue decomposition for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids compared with non-Bt corn hybrids has prompted investigative study. We evaluated the residue decomposition rates of Bt and non-Bt corn hybrids over a period of 22 mo under field conditions using the litter bag technique. The four corn hybrids used were (i) DKC60–16 (Bt+, Cry1Ab protein active against the leptidopteran European corn borer, event MON810), (ii) DKC60–12 (Bt+, Cry3Bb1 protein active against the coleopteran corn rootworm, event MON863), (iii) DKC60–14 (stacked Bt++, Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 proteins) and, (iv) DKC60–15 (Bt−, base ...