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Psychology

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Gender

Graduate College Dissertations and Theses

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Peer Victimization And The Development Of Anxiety And Depressive Symptoms: The Roles Of Stress Physiology And Gender, Leigh Ann Holterman Jan 2016

Peer Victimization And The Development Of Anxiety And Depressive Symptoms: The Roles Of Stress Physiology And Gender, Leigh Ann Holterman

Graduate College Dissertations and Theses

The overall goal of the current study was to determine whether experiences of relational and physical victimization were related to anxiety and depressive symptoms in a sample of emerging adults. This study also investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender, as well as by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) reactivity to peer stress. Although work in this area has focused on children (e.g., Cullerton-Sen & Crick, 2005; Rudolph et al., 2009), it appears the presence and function of victimization changes with age, and the negative effects of victimization can last through early adulthood (e.g., Gros et ...


Susceptibility To Peer Influence For Engagement In Relational Aggression And Prosocial Behavior: The Roles Of Popular Peers, Stress Physiology, And Gender, Nicole Lin Lafko Jan 2015

Susceptibility To Peer Influence For Engagement In Relational Aggression And Prosocial Behavior: The Roles Of Popular Peers, Stress Physiology, And Gender, Nicole Lin Lafko

Graduate College Dissertations and Theses

The overall goal of the current study was to determine if perceptions of popular peers' relationally aggressive (PPSRA) and prosocial behaviors (PPSP) were related to engagement in these behaviors in a sample of emerging adults. This study also investigated if these associations were moderated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) reactivity to peer stress and gender. Although a significant amount of research suggests that aggressive behaviors can be socialized by peers (e.g., Molano, Jones, Brown, & Aber, 2013), there is a dearth of work that has examined relational forms of aggression that tend to be more salient for females and more positive, prosocial behaviors. Further, given that some research suggests that perceptions about how peers behave, regardless of peers' actual behavior, influences individual behavior (e.g., Song et al., 2012), the current study investigated the impact of perceptions of peer behavior. Additionally, research suggests that some individuals are more susceptible to peer influence than others (e.g., Steinberg & Monahan, 2007). Biological Sensitivity to Context (BSC) has been offered as a potential explanation for this differential susceptibility to peer influence (e.g., Boyce & Ellis, 2005). BSC theory postulates that individuals with a heightened stress response are more malleable to environmental influence, for better or worse; therefore, the interaction between PNS reactivity to stress (measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA-R]) and SNS reactivity (measured by skin ...