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Behavioral Effects Of A Sleep Intervention In Preschoolers With Sleep Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Zoe Parisian-Jeppesen Jan 2019

Behavioral Effects Of A Sleep Intervention In Preschoolers With Sleep Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Zoe Parisian-Jeppesen

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Sleep has been recognized as an important determinant for healthy development in children, with well documented effects on, not only physical health, but also emotional development. The mechanisms and extent of these relationships have yet to be fully elucidated. Considering that sleep is a modifiable health risk factor with myriad compounding impacts across the lifespan, this area of research is of distinct importance in the sphere of public health. This preliminary study is unique in that it uses a randomized, controlled experimental paradigm to assess the relationship between healthy sleep and emotion processing in children. 12 children with sleep problems ...


Disembodied Entities: Linguistic Factors Determining Semantic Role Assignment Of Target Domain Referents In Metaphoric Duals, Zachary Rosen Jan 2018

Disembodied Entities: Linguistic Factors Determining Semantic Role Assignment Of Target Domain Referents In Metaphoric Duals, Zachary Rosen

Linguistics Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Though there exists a profound, and constantly evolving literature exploring the nature of English speakers’ alternations of temporal metaphors (Gentner, Imai, & Boroditsky 2002; McGlone & Harding 1998; Matlock, Ramscar, & Boroditsky 2005 as a selection), strikingly little work has been done on extending the research in temporal reasoning to other examples of metaphoric duals (as defined in Lakoff 1993)—alternations in which the target domain referent is either construed as moving object in space, such as in “His sadness is catching up to him”, or as a location to which other entities are oriented to, as in “He fell into a deep sadness”—in other domains ...


Affective And Neural Correlates Of Conflict Interactions Of Romantic Couples, Briana Lucia Robustelli Jan 2018

Affective And Neural Correlates Of Conflict Interactions Of Romantic Couples, Briana Lucia Robustelli

Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Conflict interactions are almost universally experienced by romantic couples, are often emotionally rich, and are associated with many important mental and physical health outcomes. These factors make conflict interactions an excellent topic for investigation in studies of emotion and couples. The current study included 20 heterosexual romantic couples who had been in a relationship for at least 2 years. Each couple completed a video recorded conflict interaction task and both partners in each couple viewed their own interaction and the interaction of another couple in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. Partners then completed an emotion rating task where ...


Salience In Mere Exposure: Salience Makes Evaluations More Extreme And Accounts For Exposure Effects, Kellen Mrkva Jan 2018

Salience In Mere Exposure: Salience Makes Evaluations More Extreme And Accounts For Exposure Effects, Kellen Mrkva

Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Theses & Dissertations

I propose and support a salience account of exposure effects suggesting that repeated exposure to stimuli influences evaluations and emotion by increasing salience, the relative quality of standing out in relation to other stimuli in the environment. From this idea that exposure increases salience, I derive the hypotheses that repeated exposure to stimuli will make evaluations more extreme and emotional reactions more intense (in addition to increasing liking as in previous mere exposure research; Montoya et al., 2017; Zajonc, 1968). In Experiments 1 and 2, I manipulate exposure, presenting some stimuli 9 times and other stimuli 3 times, 1 time ...


Metaphor To Memory: Effects Of Spatiotemporal Metaphors On The Emotional Valence Of Autobiographical Memories, Jayne B. Williamson-Lee Jan 2018

Metaphor To Memory: Effects Of Spatiotemporal Metaphors On The Emotional Valence Of Autobiographical Memories, Jayne B. Williamson-Lee

Undergraduate Honors Theses

English speakers conceptualize the passing of time in one of two ways: as events in time moving toward them (the time-moving perspective) or as themselves moving through time (the ego-moving perspective). Previous studies suggest that these construals of time have corresponding emotional valences (positive and negative, respectively), which influence perceptions of emotional experiences. This study investigates whether spatiotemporal metaphors evoke valence-specific memories – specifically whether the ego-moving perspective evokes positive memories and the time-moving perspective negative memories. Participants read statements depicting events in motion and wrote about autobiographical memories. Memories recalled were evaluated as positive or negative by the researcher. Results ...


The Neural Embodiment Of Human Emotion, Marianne Cumella Reddan Jan 2016

The Neural Embodiment Of Human Emotion, Marianne Cumella Reddan

Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Colloquially, we describe emotion as something we feel, but it remains unknown whether emotional experiences and bodily sensations share representational space in the human brain. Does the neural basis of emotion include activation in cortex specialized to represent bodily sensation and action? There is growing evidence that emotions are ‘embodied,’ or grounded in simulations of some modality, such as perception and action. However, a causal link between reports of bodily sensations and discrete emotional states has not been established. This investigation aims to bridge bodily sensations of emotion with its neural construction by analyzing the representational similarity between self-reported topographical ...


Attention Directs Emotion: Directed Attention Drives Emotional Intensity And Distinctiveness Of Facial Perception, Ashley Marie Schuett Jan 2016

Attention Directs Emotion: Directed Attention Drives Emotional Intensity And Distinctiveness Of Facial Perception, Ashley Marie Schuett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Does attention affect how you feel about someone? Researchers have shown that there may be a relationship between attention and emotion. However, less research has been done to investigate the relationship between the level of attention and the impact on the perception of others. Given that, this study was conducted to test two hypotheses. First, that directing attention towards a face increases threat and decreases trustworthiness one feels towards that person. Second, that attention increases emotion because it increases distinctiveness. To test these hypotheses, 43 participants underwent a computer simulation and viewed six sets of slideshows that contained white and ...


Angry Abolitionists & The Rhetoric Of Slavery: Minding The Moral Emotions In Social Movements, Benjamin Lamb-Books Jan 2015

Angry Abolitionists & The Rhetoric Of Slavery: Minding The Moral Emotions In Social Movements, Benjamin Lamb-Books

Sociology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Although emotion is increasingly central in theories of social change, the sociology of social movements and emotion continues to have a mix-and-stir quality. Through a microanalysis of abolitionist discourse, this dissertation observes how the two are systematically intertwined by status claimsmaking processes. To better explore the affective dynamics of protest rhetoric through which `social movements move,' I construct a new synthetic theory of status as a moral-emotional resource, dependent upon cultural imaginaries and negotiated through rhetorical implicatures. Status-oriented moral emotions--including the egocentric and altruistic types of anger examined in this case study--can be aroused, altered, and rechanneled toward reform causes ...


Remembering That Neutral Feeling? Enhanced Memory For Neutral, But Not Positive Or Negative, Emotional Stimuli In Bipolar I Disorder, Gaia Cooper Jan 2015

Remembering That Neutral Feeling? Enhanced Memory For Neutral, But Not Positive Or Negative, Emotional Stimuli In Bipolar I Disorder, Gaia Cooper

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is associated with heightened and persistent positive emotion (Gruber, 2011; Johnson, 2005). Yet we know less about underlying cognitive processes that may influence these observed biases in emotionality. One promising approach is to examine cognitive processes, such as declarative memory, that may serve as an important window into understanding how individuals with BD remember emotion-laden stimuli. The current study presented standardized positive, negative and neutral emotion eliciting images to remitted BD I adults (n=26) and healthy controls (CTL; n=24) and measured accuracy in recall after a subsequent 60-minute delay ...


The Effects Of The Emotional State On An Observer In The Face In The Crowd Paradigm, Kale A. Hubert Jan 2015

The Effects Of The Emotional State On An Observer In The Face In The Crowd Paradigm, Kale A. Hubert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The face in the crowd paradigm refers to a particular visual search task in which participants are asked to identify target facial expressions in a crowd of distractors. Previous research in this vein has suggested performance is enhanced for angry faces, an anger-superiority effect. There is however disagreement in many of these findings, and this disagreement may partly be explained by a failure to recognize the role of observer mood, response bias, and discrimination ability in the paradigm. The present study used a face in the crowd visual search task and assessed participant mood state using the Positive and Negative ...


Too Close For Comfort? Social Distance And Positive Emotion Perception In Bipolar I Disorder, Joseph William Fischer Jan 2015

Too Close For Comfort? Social Distance And Positive Emotion Perception In Bipolar I Disorder, Joseph William Fischer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is associated with heightened and persistent positive emotion (Gruber, 2011; Johnson, 2005). Yet we know less about how troubled emotion responding may translate into dynamic face-to-face interactions involving others, especially in contexts where automatic social regulation of personal distance from others is key to maintaining social boundaries. Using a novel distance paradigm adapted from prior work (Adolphs et al., 2009) participants with a history of bipolar I disorder (BD; n = 30) and healthy controls (CTL; n = 31) provided online measurements of social distance preferences in response to positive, negative and neutral ...


Depression And Cognitive Control In The Face Of Negative Information Or Stressors, Roselinde Henderson Kaiser Jan 2012

Depression And Cognitive Control In The Face Of Negative Information Or Stressors, Roselinde Henderson Kaiser

Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Previous research has indicated that people with depression exhibit altered cognitive control functioning when confronted by negative information or stress. However, identifying the factors that drive such altered functioning, or how to protect the ability to implement cognitive control, remain topics of debate. The current thesis explores these themes: what is it about the content of salient, distracting stimuli that predicts altered cognitive control in depression, how is such interference manifested on the level of brain activation, and what protects cognitive control functioning in the face of such stimuli. Study 1 investigated the relationship between depression and brain activation in ...


From Mindless To Mindful Decision Making: Reflecting On Prescriptive Processes, Michaela Huber Jan 2010

From Mindless To Mindful Decision Making: Reflecting On Prescriptive Processes, Michaela Huber

Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Theses & Dissertations

People frequently make judgments and decisions in ways that, in hindsight, they might prefer to have made differently. Their judgments and decisions may be strongly influenced by some attributes that people would prefer receive less weight (e.g. transient emotions, peripheral cues, and social influence), and people may neglect other attributes that they would prefer receive more weight (e.g. factual information, subjective experiences, and personal preference). The central claim in this dissertation is that asking people to reflect on prescriptive decision processes--how decisions should be made--elicits a psychological state of mindfulness where people are increasingly aware of and better ...