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Psychology

Theses/Dissertations

2006

Psychology Honors Theses

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Separate Peace Revisited: Reactions To Having Hurt An Envied Other, Ashley Ginter Oct 2006

Separate Peace Revisited: Reactions To Having Hurt An Envied Other, Ashley Ginter

Psychology Honors Theses

This study investigated how individuals, and narcissists in particular, respond when they bring harm to someone they envy, and what they do in response to the harm that they caused. We examined how high versus low levels of responsibility for harming an envied person would affect levels of schadenfreude (i.e., pleasure at other’s suffering), guilt and prosocial behavior. We expected that narcissists would display more schadenfreude, less guilt, and less prosocial behavior than nonnarcissists, even when they were made to feel responsible for the downfall of the person. Results showed a significant relationship between narcissism and schadenfreude, with ...


Violence From Self-Love: Narcissism And Aggression In The Face Of Ego Threat, Ashley Girgis May 2006

Violence From Self-Love: Narcissism And Aggression In The Face Of Ego Threat, Ashley Girgis

Psychology Honors Theses

The current study examines the relationship between narcissism and aggression. The link between narcissistic personalities and heightened aggressive response to ego threat has been substantiated in the literature (Twenge & Campbell, 2003), but it is unclear whether this response is driven by a self-repairing mechanism to restore damaged self-esteem or by an ego-promoting mechanism to vent frustration at not being admired. These mechanisms were tested by giving narcissists either mistaken public ego threats or negative feedback. Results replicate the link between narcissism and aggression but do not point to one mechanism over the other; additional data, however, provide information about other aspects of the aggressive response, suggesting it is more sadistic than simply a reaction to being threatened.