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Time As A Shared Resource : The Effects Of Depression And Behavior Verifiability On Perceptions Of Temporal Investment, Jody Lynn Jones Aug 1992

Time As A Shared Resource : The Effects Of Depression And Behavior Verifiability On Perceptions Of Temporal Investment, Jody Lynn Jones

Master's Theses

People have a tendency to view themselves in a more favorable light than they do others, a phenomenon termed the egocentric bias (Messick, Bloom, Boldizar, & Samuelson, 1985). Past research has shown that people are more likely to display the bias in situations that are "nonverifiable", meaning that there is no way to accurately measure the dimension on which judgments are made (Allison, Messick, & Goethals, 1989). Two experiments tested the hypothesis that only nondepressed individuals in a nonverifiable situation would show the egocentric bias, whereas non depressed subjects in the verifiable condition and depressed subjects in both conditions would not show ...


Relations Among Perspective Taking, Egocentrism, And Self-Esteem In Late Adolescents, Kimberly D. Leister Aug 1992

Relations Among Perspective Taking, Egocentrism, And Self-Esteem In Late Adolescents, Kimberly D. Leister

Master's Theses

This study examined the relations among perspective taking, egocentrism, and self-esteem in a sample of 113 undergraduate college students. Self-report measures of the the three constructs were used. Subjects in different levels of perspective taking did not differ significantly from one another in either egocentrism or self-esteem. Pearson correlations revealed that egocentrism was not related to self-esteem in level 2 perspective takers, but that these two constructs were negatively related in 3 perspective takers. Additionally, when subjects were in level 2 perspective taking, feedback did not alter their perceptions of themselves. However, when in level 3, feedback did affect subjects ...


Eating Disorders, The Imposter Phenomenon, And Achievement In A Nonclinical Population, Anne Marie Ross Jordan Apr 1992

Eating Disorders, The Imposter Phenomenon, And Achievement In A Nonclinical Population, Anne Marie Ross Jordan

Master's Theses

The Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), the Work and Family orientation Questionnaire (WOFO), and the Impostor Phenomenon (IP) Scale were compared to determine whether these tests measure similar phenomena in women in a nonclinical population. Each test was subjected to factor analysis to explore existing factor structures. The combined scales of the three tests were factor analyzed, and four factors emerged. The EDI scales loaded on two factors (Symptomology and Immaturity), and the IP Scale loaded on both of these factors. The WOFO loaded on two separate factors (Achievement and Personal Unconcern), with the Perfectionism and Interpersonal Distrust scales of the ...


Changes In Spatial Learning Ability In Female Rats Due To Neonatal Transplantation Of Male Hippocampal Tissue, David B. Carr Apr 1992

Changes In Spatial Learning Ability In Female Rats Due To Neonatal Transplantation Of Male Hippocampal Tissue, David B. Carr

Honors Theses

It has long been acknowledged that sex differences occur in the performance of learning tasks. Specifically, it has been found that males typically outperform females in spatial learning tasks such as maze tasks. Recently, evidence has emerged which directly links sex differences in behavior to specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS). This evidence indicates that sexually dimorphic behaviors may be altered by the neonatal transplantation of opposite sex brain tissue. This research sought to extend these findings by examining the effects of neonatal transplantation of male hippocampal tissue on the spatial learning ability of adult females in three ...


Relationships Among Gender, Gender Role Individualized Trust, And Self-Disclosure, John D. Foubert Apr 1992

Relationships Among Gender, Gender Role Individualized Trust, And Self-Disclosure, John D. Foubert

Master's Theses

Self-disclosure, the process of revealing personal information to other people, was examined in relation to gender, gender role and individualized trust. Undergraduate subjects (N = 293) completed the Jourard Self-Disclosure Scale (Jourard, 1971b), the Individualized Trust Scales (Wheeless & Grotz, 1977), the Bem Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974), and a demographic questionnaire. Significant interactions emerged between gender and individualized trust (p < .01), gender and gender role (p < .05), and individualized trust and gender role (p = .01). An androgynous gender role was shown to lead to higher rates of self-disclosure in the high trust condition but not in the low trust condition. Although masculine males and masculine females did not disclose differently, feminine females disclosed markedly more than feminine males. The relationship between individualized trust and gender role revealed an increase in self-disclosure common to androgynous individuals is restricted to those who are high trusting.


Efficacious Impression Management In Minority Recruitment And Retention Practices, Amy L. Kristof Apr 1992

Efficacious Impression Management In Minority Recruitment And Retention Practices, Amy L. Kristof

Honors Theses

The present study suggests impression management strategies that companies can use to more effectively recruit and retain minority workers. As the workforce composition changes over the next ten years, the need for companies to attract and retain qualified diverse workers will become increasingly important. The present study focused on two minority groups, women and senior citizens. These minority workers were asked to rate the importance of suggestions given by personnel adminstrators, as to what things would attract members of their minority group to an organization. Both groups cited honesty, fair treatment, and hiring and promotion based on ability and not ...


Leaders Of The Future : Differentiating Leaders Among High School Seniors, Richard S. Mohn Jr. Mar 1992

Leaders Of The Future : Differentiating Leaders Among High School Seniors, Richard S. Mohn Jr.

Master's Theses

The present study investigated high school leadership at two independent high schools using a peer nomination technique. Seniors nominate classmates who best fit each of 20 items indexing attributes of business world leaders. The seniors also nominated students they liked most and liked least. The leadership attributes were conceptualized to fit into four constructs: Other oriented, Inner oriented, Situationally oriented, and Derailment characteristics. The like most and like least items were used for measuring social impact and social preference and for classifying students into the sociometric groups of popular, controversial, rejected, neglected, and average. Test-retest correlations at a one month ...