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Traits As Self-Schemata And Their Effect On Recall Of Content-Specific Adjectives, Victor Lee Barrow Nov 1985

Traits As Self-Schemata And Their Effect On Recall Of Content-Specific Adjectives, Victor Lee Barrow

Master's Theses

The concept that personality traits serve as a priori self schemata cognitive structures in memory was investigated. College students from University of Richmond were tested on recall of 160 content-specific adjectives and then administered the Personality Research Form. After being shown the list of adjectives, subjects were given a five-minute distractor task and then given fifteen minutes to recall as many adjectives as possible. A correlational analysis was performed on the scores on the personality traits of achievement, affiliation, autonomy, dominance, endurance, nurturance, order, play, sentience, and understanding and with the recall of content-specific adjectives. The correlation between the trait ...


The Self-Concept Of Pregnant And Nonpregnant Adolescents And Changes That Occur Between Trimesters, Linda Aileen Furlani Aug 1985

The Self-Concept Of Pregnant And Nonpregnant Adolescents And Changes That Occur Between Trimesters, Linda Aileen Furlani

Master's Theses

Twenty-two nonpregnant adolescents and 14 pregnant adolescents selected from Chesterfield Health Department's clinic population participated in a study to determine if the self-concept of a nonpregnant adolescent is higher than that of a pregnant adolescent. Each group was further subdivided into a middle adolescent and a late adolescent category to determine if there is any difference in the self-concept of a pregnant adolescent in the middle adolescent stage versus that of a pregnant adolescent in the late adolescent stage. Coopersmith's Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI), School Form, was administered to test the subject's perception of herself and to measure ...


Personality Variables That Discriminate Pseudoseizures Patients And Epileptic Patients Used In The 16 Pf, Patricia Lane Marshall May 1985

Personality Variables That Discriminate Pseudoseizures Patients And Epileptic Patients Used In The 16 Pf, Patricia Lane Marshall

Master's Theses

This project was designed to study the effect of certain personality factors on pseudoseizure patients. It was hypothesized that Factors C and O in the 16 Personality Questionnaire could serve as predictor variables for the criterion variable, positive diagnosis of pseudoseizure versus true epileptic seizures. It was also hypothesized that these two groups, pseudoseizure versus epileptic seizure, would differ significantly on a test titled the Sickness Impact Profile. The two scales in this test, psychosocial and physical, were examined. Two discriminant analyses were performed with these two tests being the predictor variables and group membership being the criterion variable. Non-significant ...


Interpersonal Consequences Of Expressing Concern About Nuclear War, Ann Angell Dew May 1985

Interpersonal Consequences Of Expressing Concern About Nuclear War, Ann Angell Dew

Master's Theses

The effects of sex role expectations within the context of the nuclear war issue were examined in this study. Sixty males and sixty females, ranging in age from 18 to 22 years, participated in this study. They were obtained from the introductory psychology courses at the University of Richmond. Each subject read a questionnaire, supposedly completed by another University of Richmond undergraduate, and answered two Likert-type questions measuring the degree to which the subject would like to meet and become friends with the target. The independent variables were sex of the target, sex of subject, and expression of concern about ...


Self-Presentational Determinants Of Sex Differences In Leadership Behavior, Donelson R. Forsyth, Barry R. Schlenker, Mark R. Leary, Nancy E. Mccown May 1985

Self-Presentational Determinants Of Sex Differences In Leadership Behavior, Donelson R. Forsyth, Barry R. Schlenker, Mark R. Leary, Nancy E. Mccown

Jepson School of Leadership Studies articles, book chapters and other publications

Men and women placed in leadership positions communicated information about their skills and abilities to their subordinates. Although leaders’ perceptions of their abilities, group members’ knowledge of their leader’s abilities, and the specific skills needed by the leader were all manipulated in the experimental setting, self-presentations of ability were primarily determined by sex role stereotypes rather than by situational factors. Results indicated that (1) male leaders emphasized their social influence and task abilities; (2) female leaders emphasized their interpersonal, socioemotional abilities; and (3) group members felt task ability, as compared to interpersonal ability, was a far more important skill ...


Effects Of The Color Analysis Process On The Self-Concept Of Women, Sherry Tanenbaum May 1985

Effects Of The Color Analysis Process On The Self-Concept Of Women, Sherry Tanenbaum

Honors Theses

This study used a pre/post test design to investigate the effects of a color analysis by Suzanne Cagyill on the self-concept of women. The individual's value system was examined for its effect on integration of the color process. Personality correlations of participants using Suzanne's Season typology were also investigated. Ninety-eight subjects, 94 women and 4 men, completed both the California Personality Inventory (CPI) and the Gordon Allport Scale of Values. Pre-test and post-test pictures were also taken of each subject. A subgroup of approximately 45 women received a more intense analysis in addition to the general color ...


Personality Variables That Discriminate Pseudoseizures Patients And Epileptic Patients Used In The 16 Pf, Patricia L. Marshall May 1985

Personality Variables That Discriminate Pseudoseizures Patients And Epileptic Patients Used In The 16 Pf, Patricia L. Marshall

Master's Theses

This project was designed to study the effect of certain personality factors on pseudoseizure patients. It was hypothesized that Factors C and 0 in the 16 Personality Questionnaire could serve as predictor variables for the criterion variable, positive diagnosis of pseudoseizure versus true epileptic seizures. It was also hypothesized that these two groups, pseudoseizure versus epileptic seizure, would differ significantly on a test titled the Sickness Impact Profile. The two scales in this test, psychosocial and physical, were examined. Two discriminant analyses were performed with these two tests being the predictor variables and group membership being the criterion variable. Non-significant ...


The Effects Of Birth Order Upon Personality, Laura W. Quarles Apr 1985

The Effects Of Birth Order Upon Personality, Laura W. Quarles

Honors Theses

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between birth order and personality with particular attention paid to the first born as opposed to other children. Familial differences in the early socialization of various ordinal positions are explored. Their impact upon first borns calls for a study of the needs and social characteristics of oldest children. Differences in sociability from early childhood through adulthood are also investigated as are birth order effects within mentally ill populations. Finally, the methodological problems in birth order research are explored.


Residence, Perceived Latitude Of Choice And Desired Control Among The Long-Livin, Steven R. Shank Jan 1985

Residence, Perceived Latitude Of Choice And Desired Control Among The Long-Livin, Steven R. Shank

Master's Theses

Perceived control, perceived choice, and residential setting are important factors which need to be addressed in research involving long-living. The focus of this study was to determine the relationships among thee variables. The search for an interaction between residential setting (either high or low constraining) and perceived choice and its effect on perceived control distinguishes this study from previous research.


Effects Of Own Voice Vs. Another's Voice During Progressive Relaxation, Tay Corrie Weber Jan 1985

Effects Of Own Voice Vs. Another's Voice During Progressive Relaxation, Tay Corrie Weber

Master's Theses

The purpose of this study was to assess the difference in stress reduction between listening to one's own voice and listening to another's voice during taped relaxation procedures. Eighteen male undergraduates listened to relaxation tapes of their own voice, that of another person, and a control tape. Stress was measured via skin temperature. It was hypothesized that there would be a significant stress reduction (indicated by increased skin temperature) for both experimental groups and greater reduction in stress when listening to one's own voice than when listening to another voice. A Latin-Square Repeated analysis revealed only a ...


Effective Group Meetings And Decision Making, Donelson R. Forsyth Jan 1985

Effective Group Meetings And Decision Making, Donelson R. Forsyth

Jepson School of Leadership Studies articles, book chapters and other publications

An extraordinary amount of work and many types of decisions are handled by groups of people, for in group meetings we can pool our knowledge and abilities, give each other feedback about our ideas, and tackle problems that would overcome us if we faced them alone. Group members not only give us emotional and social support when meeting together, but they can stimulate us to become more creative, more insightful, and more committed to our goals.

Not every group, however, realizes all these positive consequences. Often we dread going to "committee meetings," "council sessions," and "discussion groups" because they take ...


Program Evaluation Of St. Mary's Hospice, Lyn M. Harper Jan 1985

Program Evaluation Of St. Mary's Hospice, Lyn M. Harper

Honors Theses

The purpose of this program evaluation was to identify the needs of families of terminally ill patients and their perceptions of their loved ones needs. Another objective was to determine if these needs were met in St. Mary's Hospice Program and who responded to these needs. Subjects consisted of ten randomly chosen family members, nine females and one male, ages forty to eighty, who had lost loved ones enrolled in the hospice program at least six months prior to the study. The subjects had not received volunteer bereavement care prior to the evaluation. Responses to need questionnaires and interviews ...


The Cult Of Empiricism In Psychology, And Beyond, Stephen Toulmin, David E. Leary Jan 1985

The Cult Of Empiricism In Psychology, And Beyond, Stephen Toulmin, David E. Leary

Psychology Faculty Publications

At some stage in it's development, any field of intellectual discussion or scientific speculation may reach a point at which it begins to generate large numbers of "empirical" questions, that is, questions whose answers must refer to carefully documented observations, or even to controlled experiments. In physics, this happened most strikingly in the course of the seventeenth century; in biology, the comparable stage was not reached until around 1770, rising to its peak in the course of the nineteenth century (Toulmin, 1972; Toulmin & Goodfield, 1962); whereas in psychology, it has become customary-though a trifle arbitrary-to argue that this happened just one ...