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Phytophthora

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Sampling And Testing For Plant Pathogens, Aileen Reid Jan 2006

Sampling And Testing For Plant Pathogens, Aileen Reid

Bulletins 4000 -

There are many methods used in the laboratory to determine whether Phytophthora or other fungi are present in growing media, water supply and diseased plants. These include:

• filtering water for spores

• baiting for fungi in growing media and water samples

• examining diseased plant tissue microscopically

• direct culturing from roots and other plant parts to isolate the fungal pathogen in pure culture.

This bulletin outlines some of the procedures involved. Growers may be able to do some basic baiting of soil or water samples themselves to alert them of a problem but the procedures involved in isolating and identifying pathogens are ...


Phytophthora Diseases Of Cutflower Crops, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia Jan 2006

Phytophthora Diseases Of Cutflower Crops, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

Bulletins 4000 -

Phytophthora root rot is the most common soil borne disease causing plant death in native cut flower production. It is also a pathogen of exotic cutflower crops such as rose, lily, carnation, proteas and gerbera. The fungus, Phytophthora cinnamomi, the cause of jarrah dieback is the pathogen that first comes to mind when Phytophthora is mentioned. This has one of the widest host ranges of all Phytophthora species, particularly amongst native Australia species. P.nicotianae also has a wide host range, infecting a wide range of exotic, as well as Australian native flower crops. There are also a number of ...


Diseases Of Waxflower And Their Control, Aileen Reid Sep 2003

Diseases Of Waxflower And Their Control, Aileen Reid

Bulletins 4000 -

Waxflower is susceptible to a range of diseases. This outlines the main problems which occur in commercial plantations and presents measures to control them. Since chemicals for control of plant diseases are constantly changing, growers are advised to seek the latest available information.