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American Communism And Cold War Censorship: The Creation Of A New American Citizen, Matthew P. Valdespino Apr 2013

American Communism And Cold War Censorship: The Creation Of A New American Citizen, Matthew P. Valdespino

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

In this paper, I will examine the relationship between political censorship and Democratic Identity in the United States. Specifically, I will focus on anti-Communist measures aimed at members of the Communist Party of the United States during the Red Scare in the 1950’s. This work will help illuminate on the relationship between political censorship and democratic identity, both on the part of the censors and the censored. Furthermore, by analyzing the Supreme Court’s response to these measures, this work will help demonstrate the link between the Court’s modern jurisprudence on political speech and the decisions of this ...


Tying The Knot: Determining The Legality Of Same-Sex Marriage And The Courts’ Responsibilities In Defining The Right, Eva Cerreta May 2012

Tying The Knot: Determining The Legality Of Same-Sex Marriage And The Courts’ Responsibilities In Defining The Right, Eva Cerreta

Honors Scholar Theses

Ambiguous terms and phrases in the United States Bill of Rights have caused a great deal of controversy throughout United States history over what rights truly exist and which branch of government should be responsible for determining those rights. These questions are currently being debated in states throughout the country concerning the right to same-sex marriage. This thesis answers these questions of legality and responsibility concerning the right to same-sex marriage. The thesis uses case law of the doctrinal development of the Equal Protection Clause and the right to privacy to suggest that the Equal Protection Clause provides the soundest ...


Political Theory In Institutional Context: The Case Of Patriot Royalism, John Compton, Karen Orren Jan 2012

Political Theory In Institutional Context: The Case Of Patriot Royalism, John Compton, Karen Orren

Political Science Faculty Articles and Research

In the aftermath of the Stamp Act, prominent American thinkers of otherwise unquestioned Whiggish affiliation adopted an expansive view of the king’s prerogative powers while simultaneously denying Parliament’s authority to interfere in the internal governance of the colonies. Scholars have generally attributed this stance, known as “patriot royalism,” to political necessity: with no other means of disputing Parliament’s oppressive actions, desperate pamphleteers sought to revive the discredited constitutional ideas of the Stuarts. In contrast, we argue that this position was deeply rooted in the institutional context of colonial governance. More specifically, we show that revolutionary Americans directly ...


The Switch In Time That Saved Nine: A Study Of Justice Owen Roberts's Vote In West Coast Hotel Co. V. Parrish, Brian T. Goldman Jan 2012

The Switch In Time That Saved Nine: A Study Of Justice Owen Roberts's Vote In West Coast Hotel Co. V. Parrish, Brian T. Goldman

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

During President Roosevelt's first term in office (1932-1936) the Supreme Court ruled several landmark New Deal measures unconstitutional; a handful of these decisions were by 5-4 margins. It all changed in 1937, when swing Justice Owen Roberts voted to affirm a minimum wage statute in West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish; a year earlier he had voted against minimum wage legislation in a similar case.

This "switch in time that saved nine" has no established consensus that explains its occurrence. Some have posited that President Roosevelt's "court packing" legislation forced Roberts's hand, while other have argued that ...


First Amendment "Beefs": Agricultural Checkoff Programs And Freedom Of Speech, Sarah A. Vaughn Apr 2011

First Amendment "Beefs": Agricultural Checkoff Programs And Freedom Of Speech, Sarah A. Vaughn

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

In the past fourteen years, the Supreme Court has ruled three separate times on the constitutionality of Federal Farm Promotion Programs under the First Amendment. The challenge has been that the programs, which fund generic advertisements such as “Got Milk?” and “Beef: It’s What’s For Dinner,” compel the subsidization of objectionable speech from private producers. The answers handed down from the Court have been conflicting, but each has contributed to the new, still-emerging “government speech doctrine.” In the most recent case, Johanns v. Livestock Marketing Association (2005), the Court ruled that the speech in question was completely governmental ...