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Constitutional Law

First Amendment

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

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Thwarting Speech On College Campuses, Stephen Wermiel Jan 2018

Thwarting Speech On College Campuses, Stephen Wermiel

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


The Ongoing Challenge To Define Free Speech, Stephen Wermiel Jan 2018

The Ongoing Challenge To Define Free Speech, Stephen Wermiel

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Behind The U.S. Reports: Justice Brennan's Unpublished Opinions And Memoranda In New York Times V. Sullivan And Its Progeny, Stephen Wermiel Jan 2014

Behind The U.S. Reports: Justice Brennan's Unpublished Opinions And Memoranda In New York Times V. Sullivan And Its Progeny, Stephen Wermiel

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The contributions Justice William J. Brennan Jr. made to free expression in general and the law of libel in particular are unquestioned. His opinion in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan and cases that followed established sturdy protection for critics of public officials and helped further the marketplace of ideas that is so important for public discourse. Justice Brennan wrote thousands of words about Sullivan and its impact that never appeared in published opinions, however. Often he was required to alter his writings to accommodate the views of other justices needed for a majority. Those unpublished opinions – and memoranda he ...


The Landmark That Wasn't: A First Amendment Play In Five Acts Case Study And Commentaries, Stephen Wermiel Jan 2013

The Landmark That Wasn't: A First Amendment Play In Five Acts Case Study And Commentaries, Stephen Wermiel

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

What follows is an original case study of our First Amendment law of free expression and how it is created by the Supreme Court. Drawing heavily on heretofore unpublished internal papers from the chambers of Justice William Brennan and other Justices, this Article reveals how the 1964 landmark decision in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan was once in serious jeopardy of being overruled. In the course of this discussion, and in their examination of the evolution of the Court’s decision in Dun & Bradstreet v. Greenmoss Builders (1985), the authors describe and analyze: (1) how and to what extent the holdings in Sullivan and Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc. (1974) came to be reconsidered; (2) how the nature of the expression at issue in Greenmoss Builders factored into the examination ...


What Is The Meaning Of Like: The First Amendment Implications Of Social-Media Expression, Ira Robbins Jan 2013

What Is The Meaning Of Like: The First Amendment Implications Of Social-Media Expression, Ira Robbins

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Everywhere the Internet goes, new legal problems are sure to follow. As social media expands and infiltrates our daily lives, society must grapple with how to extend the law to modern situations. This problem becomes increasingly pressing as more and more of our social interactions take place online. For example, Facebook has become a colossal gathering place for friends, families, co-workers, frenemies, and others to disseminate their ideas and share information. Sometimes Facebook replaces old institutions; other times it augments them. Where once a neighbor would show allegiance to a political candidate by staking a sign on the front lawn ...


Constitutional Borrowing, Robert L. Tsai Jan 2009

Constitutional Borrowing, Robert L. Tsai

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Borrowing from one domain to promote ideas in another domain is a staple of constitutional decisionmaking. Precedents, arguments, concepts, tropes, and heuristics all can be carried across doctrinal boundaries for purposes of persuasion. Yet the practice itself remains underanalyzed. This Article seeks to bring greater theoretical attention to the matter. It defines what constitutional borrowing is and what it is not, presents a typology that describes its common forms, undertakes a principled defense of borrowing, and identifies some of the risks involved. The authors' examples draw particular attention to places where legal mechanisms and ideas migrate between fields of law ...


Digitus Impudicus: The Middle Finger And The Law, Ira Robbins Apr 2008

Digitus Impudicus: The Middle Finger And The Law, Ira Robbins

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The middle finger is one of the most commonly used insulting gestures in the United States. The finger, which is used to convey a wide range of emotions, is visible on streets and highways, in schools, shopping malls, and sporting events, in courts and execution chambers, in advertisements and on magazine covers, and even on the hallowed floor of the United States Senate. Despite its ubiquity, however, as a number of recent cases demonstrate, those who use the middle finger in public run the risk of being stopped, arrested, prosecuted, fined, and even incarcerated under disorderly conduct or breach of ...


Inchoate Liability And The Espionage Act: The Statutory Framework And The Freedom Of The Press, Stephen I. Vladeck Jan 2007

Inchoate Liability And The Espionage Act: The Statutory Framework And The Freedom Of The Press, Stephen I. Vladeck

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The debate over the proper balance between national security and freedom of the press has increasingly focused on the media's potential criminal liability for publishing sensitive information, as was threatened after the New York Times and the Washington Post disclosed the U.S. government's secret and warrantless wiretapping of domestic phone calls. With the issue of press liability for the publication of national security information, however, comes a bevy of difficult questions concerning the scope of the protections afforded to the press under the First Amendment.

This essay attempts to survey these questions in light of the absence ...


Out Of Thin Air: Using First Amendment Public Forum Analysis To Redeem American Broadcasting Regulation, Anthony E. Varona Jan 2006

Out Of Thin Air: Using First Amendment Public Forum Analysis To Redeem American Broadcasting Regulation, Anthony E. Varona

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

American television and radio broadcasters are uniquely privileged among Federal Communications Commission (FCC) licensees. Exalted as public trustees by the 1934 Communications Act, broadcasters pay virtually nothing for the use of their channels of public radiofrequency spectrum, unlike many other FCC licensees who have paid billions of dollars for similar digital spectrum. Congress envisioned a social contract of sorts between broadcast licensees and the communities they served. In exchange for their free licenses, broadcast stations were charged with providing a platform for a free marketplace of ideas that would cultivate a democratically engaged and enlightened citizenry through the broadcasting of ...


Fire, Metaphor, And Constitutional Myth-Making, Robert Tsai Jan 2004

Fire, Metaphor, And Constitutional Myth-Making, Robert Tsai

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

From the standpoint of traditional legal thought, metaphor is at best a dash of poetry adorning lawyerly analysis, and at worst an unjustifiable distraction from what is actually at stake in a legal contest. By contrast, in the eyes of those who view law as a close relative of ordinary language, metaphor is a basic building block of human understanding. This article accepts that metaphor helps us to comprehend a court's decision. At the same time, it argues that metaphor plays a special role in the realm of constitutional discourse. Metaphor in constitutional law not only reinforces doctrinal categories ...


Speech And Strife, Robert L. Tsai Jan 2004

Speech And Strife, Robert L. Tsai

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The essay strives for a better understanding of the myths, symbols, categories of power, and images deployed by the Supreme Court to signal how we ought to think about its authority. Taking examples from free speech jurisprudence, the essay proceeds in three steps. First, Tsai argues that the First Amendment constitutes a deep source of cultural authority for the Court. As a result, linguistic and doctrinal innovation in the free speech area have been at least as bold and imaginative as that in areas like the Commerce Clause. Second, in turning to cognitive theory, he distinguishes between formal legal argumentation ...


Resolving Tensions Between Copyright And The Internet, Walter Effross Jan 2000

Resolving Tensions Between Copyright And The Internet, Walter Effross

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.