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The Arts: A Traditional Sphere Of Free Expression? First Amendment Implications Of Government Funding To The Arts In The Aftermath Of Rust V. Sullivan , Thomas P. Leff Dec 1995

The Arts: A Traditional Sphere Of Free Expression? First Amendment Implications Of Government Funding To The Arts In The Aftermath Of Rust V. Sullivan , Thomas P. Leff

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Arts: A Traditional Sphere Of Free Expression? First Amendment Implications Of Government Funding To The Arts In The Aftermath Of Rust V. Sullivan , Thomas P. Leff Dec 1995

The Arts: A Traditional Sphere Of Free Expression? First Amendment Implications Of Government Funding To The Arts In The Aftermath Of Rust V. Sullivan , Thomas P. Leff

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Foreword, Louis H. Pollak Dec 1995

Foreword, Louis H. Pollak

Michigan Law Review

Introduction to the Symposium Reflections on United States v. Lopez


The Constitution's Forgotten Cover Letter: An Essay On The New Federalism And The Original Understanding, Daniel A. Farber Dec 1995

The Constitution's Forgotten Cover Letter: An Essay On The New Federalism And The Original Understanding, Daniel A. Farber

Michigan Law Review

At the end of the summer of 1787, the Philadelphia Convention issued two documents. One was the Constitution itself. The other document, now almost forgotten even by constitutional historians, was an official letter to Congress, signed by George Washington on behalf of the Convention. Congress responded with a resolution that the Constitution and "letter accompanying the same" be sent to the state legislatures for submission to conventions in each state.

The Washington letter lacks the detail and depth of some other evidence of original intent. Being a cover letter, it was designed only to introduce the accompanying document rather than ...


Enumerated Means And Unlimited Ends, H. Jefferson Powell Dec 1995

Enumerated Means And Unlimited Ends, H. Jefferson Powell

Michigan Law Review

United States v. Lopez can be read as a fairly mundane disagreement over the application of a long-settled test. The Government defended the statute under review in the case, the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990, along familiar lines as a permissible regulation of activity affecting interstate and foreign commerce.

In this essay, I do not address the question whether Lopez was an important decision. My concern instead is with the problem that underlies Lopez's particular issue of the scope of the commerce power: Given our commitment to limited national government, in what way is the national legislature actually ...


Commerce!, Deborah Jones Merritt Dec 1995

Commerce!, Deborah Jones Merritt

Michigan Law Review

In this article, I explore the Supreme Court's new definition of "Commerce ... among the several States."9 In Part I, I examine three new principles that Lopez announces and that could significantly rework the Court's Commerce Clause jurisprudence. Part II, however, shows that these principles must be understood in the context of almost a dozen factors narrowing the Supreme Court's Lopez decision. Part II also demonstrates that the lower courts have understood the contextual uniqueness of Lopez and already have distinguished the decision in upholding more than half a dozen broad exercises of congressional authority. Part III ...


"A Government Of Limited And Enumerated Powers": In Defense Of United States V. Lopez, Steven G. Calabresi Dec 1995

"A Government Of Limited And Enumerated Powers": In Defense Of United States V. Lopez, Steven G. Calabresi

Michigan Law Review

The Supreme Court's recent decision in United States v. Lopez marks a revolutionary and long overdue revival of the doctrine that the federal government is one of limited and enumerated powers. After being "asleep at the constitutional switch" for more than fifty years, the Court's decision to invalidate an Act of Congress on the ground that it exceeded the commerce power must be recognized as an extraordinary event. Even if Lopez produces no progeny and is soon overruled, the opinion has shattered forever the notion that, after fifty years of Commerce Clause precedent, we can never go back ...


Policy Distortion And Democratic Debilitation: Comparative Illumination Of The Countermajoritarian Difficulty, Mark Tushnet Nov 1995

Policy Distortion And Democratic Debilitation: Comparative Illumination Of The Countermajoritarian Difficulty, Mark Tushnet

Michigan Law Review

James Bradley Thayer set the terms of the past century's discussion of judicial review in The Origin and Scope of the American Doctrine of Constitutional Law. Thayer was concerned with what Alexander Bickel labeled the "countermajoritarian difficulty" with judicial review, that judicial review displaces decisions made by near-contemporaneous political majorities and therefore is open to the charge that it is undemocratic. Thayer attempted to minimize the displacement- of political majorities through his "clear error" rule, according to which courts should not overturn legislation unless "those who have the right to make laws have not merely made a mistake, but ...


Back To The Briarpatch: An Argument In Favor Of Constitutional Meta-Analysis In State Action Determinations, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr. Nov 1995

Back To The Briarpatch: An Argument In Favor Of Constitutional Meta-Analysis In State Action Determinations, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr.

Michigan Law Review

Brer Rabbit, after claiming repeatedly that he would prefer almost anything to being thrown into the briarpatch, expressed glee once tossed there. In fact, Brer Rabbit wanted to be in the briarpatch because, like most rabbits, he could navigate the briarpatch with relative ease: the briarpatch was home.

Over the course of a century, the Supreme Court has developed a great degree of familiarity with the state action doctrine, a doctrinal briar patch. Like Brer Rabbit, the Court has disclaimed repeatedly any interest in being there.

In this article, I argue that the existing tests for establishing the presence of ...


A Theory Of Compulsory Process Clause Discovery Rights, Jean Montoya Jul 1995

A Theory Of Compulsory Process Clause Discovery Rights, Jean Montoya

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Thirteen Easy Pieces, Frank I. Michelman May 1995

Thirteen Easy Pieces, Frank I. Michelman

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Responding to Imperfection: The Theory and Practice of Constitutional Amendment by Sanford Levinson


Is Moral Relativism A Constitutional Command?, Steven G. Gey Apr 1995

Is Moral Relativism A Constitutional Command?, Steven G. Gey

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


In Search Of The Post-Positivist Jury, Mark Cammack Apr 1995

In Search Of The Post-Positivist Jury, Mark Cammack

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Civil Service Appointments And Promotions Jan 1995

Civil Service Appointments And Promotions

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Constitution And The Subgroup Question, Martha Minow Jan 1995

The Constitution And The Subgroup Question, Martha Minow

Indiana Law Journal

Presented on Nov. 18, 1994, Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington as the 1994 Harris Lecture.


The Pale Impact Of Recent Case Law On The Ascendancy Of The Voting Rights Act, Frank N. Schellace Jan 1995

The Pale Impact Of Recent Case Law On The Ascendancy Of The Voting Rights Act, Frank N. Schellace

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.