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Originalist Law Reform, Judicial Departmentalism, And Justice Scalia, Kevin C. Walsh Jan 2017

Originalist Law Reform, Judicial Departmentalism, And Justice Scalia, Kevin C. Walsh

Law Faculty Publications

Drawing on examples from Justice Antonin Scalia's jurisprudence, this Essay uses the perspective of judicial departmentalism to examine the nature and limits of two partially successful originalist law reforms in recent years. It then shifts to an examination of how a faulty conception of judicial supremacy drove a few nonoriginalist changes in the law that Scalia properly dissented from. Despite the mistaken judicial supremacy motivating these decisions, a closer look reveals them to be backhanded tributes to judicial departmentalism because of the way that the Court had to change jurisdictional and remedial doctrines to accomplish its substantive-law alterations. The ...


Indecency Four Years After Fox Television Stations: From Big Papi To A Porn Star, An Egregious Mess At The Fcc Continues, Clay Calvert, Minch Minchin, Keran Billaud, Kevin Bruckenstein, Tershone Phillips Jan 2017

Indecency Four Years After Fox Television Stations: From Big Papi To A Porn Star, An Egregious Mess At The Fcc Continues, Clay Calvert, Minch Minchin, Keran Billaud, Kevin Bruckenstein, Tershone Phillips

University of Richmond Law Review

Using the WDBJ case as an analytical springboard, this article examines the tumultuous state of the FCC's indecency enforcement regime more than three years after the Supreme Court's June 2012 opinion in Fox Television Stations. Part I of this article briefly explores the missed First Amendment opportunities in Fox Television Stations, as well as some possible reasons why the Supreme Court chose to avoid the free-speech questions in that case." Part II addresses the FCC's decision in September 2012 to target only egregious instances of broadcast indecency and, in the process, to jettison hundreds of thousands of ...


The Constitutional Limits Of Client-Centered Decision Making, Todd A. Berger May 2016

The Constitutional Limits Of Client-Centered Decision Making, Todd A. Berger

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Truth Or Doubt? An Empirical Test Of Criminal Jury Instructions, Michael D. Cicchini, Lawrence T. White May 2016

Truth Or Doubt? An Empirical Test Of Criminal Jury Instructions, Michael D. Cicchini, Lawrence T. White

University of Richmond Law Review

Part I of this article briefly discusses the concept of proof beyond a reasonable doubt, along with its importance to individuals and society generally. Part II surveys some of the truth-related language used in multiple state and federal jurisdictions. It also examines the constitutional problems created by this language and discusses courts' inadequate responses to these problems.

Part III explains our controlled experiment, including our hypotheses, study design, and empirical findings. Part IV discusses these findings and their significance and argues that courts should immediately terminate their use of truth-based jury instructions so that our constitutional guarantees are fulfilled. Finally ...


Beyond The Right To Counsel: Increasing Notice Of Collateral Consequences, Brian M. Murray May 2015

Beyond The Right To Counsel: Increasing Notice Of Collateral Consequences, Brian M. Murray

University of Richmond Law Review

This article responds to these questions by focusing on the primary roots of this justice issue, namely the prevalence of guiltypleas and the continued efforts of legislatures to increase the life- long price of a conviction. Part I begins with a discussion of these practical realities within the criminal justice system. Part II then examines the law of guilty pleas under the Fifth Amendment, including constitutional standards for valid pleas, and how current jurisprudence fails to account for the collateral consequences mentioned in Part I. Part II also discusses the right to effective assistance of counsel under the Sixth Amendment ...


Marriage Equality Comes To Virginia, Carl Tobias May 2015

Marriage Equality Comes To Virginia, Carl Tobias

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Shot In The Dark: Why Virginia Should Adopt The Firing Squad As Its Primary Method Of Execution, P. Thomas Distanislao Mar 2015

A Shot In The Dark: Why Virginia Should Adopt The Firing Squad As Its Primary Method Of Execution, P. Thomas Distanislao

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Testing Sex, Rachel Rebouché Jan 2015

Testing Sex, Rachel Rebouché

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Commonwealth And Constitution, Robert S. Claiborne Jr. Nov 2013

Commonwealth And Constitution, Robert S. Claiborne Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why Federal Rule Of Evidence 403 Is Unconstitutional, And Why That Matters, Kenneth S. Klein May 2013

Why Federal Rule Of Evidence 403 Is Unconstitutional, And Why That Matters, Kenneth S. Klein

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Resolution Vi: The Virginia Plan And Authority To Resolve Collective Action Problems Under Article I, Section 8, Kurt T. Lash Jan 2013

Resolution Vi: The Virginia Plan And Authority To Resolve Collective Action Problems Under Article I, Section 8, Kurt T. Lash

Law Faculty Publications

The article presents on the general principles of limited enumerated federal power followed by the courts of the U.S. used for determining scope of national authority. The declaration of Resolution VI under which the U.S. Congress has the power for regulating collective action problems having national importance is discussed. The historical evidences of Resolution VI, the debates related to ratification and the errors in historical facts are also discussed.


Constitutional Forbearance, A. Christopher Bryant Mar 2012

Constitutional Forbearance, A. Christopher Bryant

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Facial And As-Applied Challenges To The Individual Mandate Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act, Edward A. Hartnett Mar 2012

Facial And As-Applied Challenges To The Individual Mandate Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act, Edward A. Hartnett

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beyond The Doctrine: Five Questions That Will Determine The Aca's Constitutional Fate, Bradley W. Joondeph Mar 2012

Beyond The Doctrine: Five Questions That Will Determine The Aca's Constitutional Fate, Bradley W. Joondeph

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Anti-Injunction Act, Congressional Inactivity, And Pre-Enforcement Challenges To § 5000a Of The Tax Code, Kevin C. Walsh Mar 2012

The Anti-Injunction Act, Congressional Inactivity, And Pre-Enforcement Challenges To § 5000a Of The Tax Code, Kevin C. Walsh

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


States' Rights And State Standing, Stephen I. Vladeck Mar 2012

States' Rights And State Standing, Stephen I. Vladeck

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Sense And Severability, Tobias A. Dorsey Mar 2012

Sense And Severability, Tobias A. Dorsey

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Federalism, Individual Rights And Judicial Engagement, Kurt T. Lash Jan 2012

Federalism, Individual Rights And Judicial Engagement, Kurt T. Lash

Law Faculty Publications

Contemporary “rights talk” under the American Constitution tends to focus on individual rights or those rights that can be perfected in the case of a single individual. This would include, for example, the rights to free expression, free exercise of religion, sexual autonomy, or the right to equal treatment. Under the broad umbrella of individual-rights talk, theoretical discussions generally involve whether courts ought to recognize a particular individual right or what level of scrutiny (or engagement) ought to apply to judicially identified individual rights.

From the beginning of our history as a nation, however, the concept of legally cognizable rights ...


A Vanishing Virginia Constitution?, Hon. Stephen R. Mccullough Nov 2011

A Vanishing Virginia Constitution?, Hon. Stephen R. Mccullough

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Brave New World Of Stop And Frisk, Ronald J. Bacigal Oct 2011

A Brave New World Of Stop And Frisk, Ronald J. Bacigal

Law Faculty Publications

In this article, the author Ron Bacigal discusses the editorials, The Shame of New York by Bob Herbert and Fighting Crime Where the Criminals Are by Heather MacDonald. These editorials were prompted by the New York City Police Department's release of figures regarding "stop and frisk" incidents within New York City.' MacDonald and Herbert reacted to the same statistical report by putting two very different spins on the raw data. While it's always helpful to compile empirical evidence, Bacigal suggests that we also need to look beyond the mere numbers. If you put aside anecdotal versions of encounters ...


Recognition: A Case Study On The Original Understanding Of Executive Power, Robert J. Reinstein Mar 2011

Recognition: A Case Study On The Original Understanding Of Executive Power, Robert J. Reinstein

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beyond Formalist Sovereignty: Who Can Represent "We The People Of The United States" Today?, David Chang Jan 2011

Beyond Formalist Sovereignty: Who Can Represent "We The People Of The United States" Today?, David Chang

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Two Understandings Of Supremacy: An Essay, Vincent J. Samar Jan 2010

Two Understandings Of Supremacy: An Essay, Vincent J. Samar

Richmond Journal of Global Law & Business

Does the supremacy provision of Article VI of the U.S. Constitution undermine the legal force of international law in the United States? Recently, there has been some debate on this issue arising out of the claim that if the U.S. Constitution is “the supreme law of the land,” and that only constitutional officers of the United States, in keeping with their responsibilities to uphold the Constitution, can decide what is international law for the U.S. Such debates are not new to the history of the world. For much of world history, national rulers have claimed that their ...


Biblical Interpretation, Constitutional Interpretation And Ignoring Text, Henry L. Chambers, Jr. Jan 2009

Biblical Interpretation, Constitutional Interpretation And Ignoring Text, Henry L. Chambers, Jr.

Law Faculty Publications

Much is made of how to interpret the Constitution. The Constitution is foundational and its law is the highest law in the land. Consequently, interpreting the Constitution correctly is important, not only so that the Constitution's words are honored but so that its ideals are honored. Similar desires accompany the interpretation of other important documents. Indeed, how a sacred text like the Bible is or can be interpreted may shed light upon how the Constitution could be or should be interpreted. This brief Essay considers how a particular vision of Christian biblical interpretation can inform constitutional interpretation. This Essay ...


Our Founding Feelings: Emotion, Commitment, And Imagination In Constitutional Culture, Doni Gewirtzman Jan 2009

Our Founding Feelings: Emotion, Commitment, And Imagination In Constitutional Culture, Doni Gewirtzman

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rights And Obligations Of Americans In Mexico Under Immigration Law And Other Areas Of Mexican Law, Jorge A. Vargas Mar 2008

Rights And Obligations Of Americans In Mexico Under Immigration Law And Other Areas Of Mexican Law, Jorge A. Vargas

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


On Federalism, Freedom, And The Founders' View Of Retained Rights - A Reply To Randy Barnett, Kurt T. Lash Jan 2008

On Federalism, Freedom, And The Founders' View Of Retained Rights - A Reply To Randy Barnett, Kurt T. Lash

Law Faculty Publications

In A Textual-Historical Theory of the Ninth Amendment, 60 Stanford Law Review, I explain how some of the most common theories of the Ninth Amendment either have nothing to do with the actual text of the Amendment or place the text in conflict with similar terms in the Tenth Amendment. Focusing on the actual words of the Amendment, I argue that the text of the Ninth point towards a federalist rule of construction in which the people's retained rights are necessarily left to the control of the collective people in the several states. I also explain how this reading ...


Overcoming Lochner In The Twenty-First Century: Taking Both Rights And Popular Sovereignty Seriously As We Seek To Secure Equal Citizenship And Promote The Public Good, Thomas B. Mcaffee Jan 2008

Overcoming Lochner In The Twenty-First Century: Taking Both Rights And Popular Sovereignty Seriously As We Seek To Secure Equal Citizenship And Promote The Public Good, Thomas B. Mcaffee

University of Richmond Law Review

Professor McAffee reviews substantive due process as the textual basis for modern fundamental rights constitutional decision-making. He contends that we should avoid both the undue literalism that rejects the idea of implied rights, as well as the attempt to substitute someone's preferred moral vision for the limits, and compromises, that are implicit in and intended by the Constitution's text. He argues, moreover, that we can largely harmonizethe variousgoals of our constitutionalsystem by taking rights se- riously and by understanding that securing rights does not ex-haustthe Constitution'spurposes.


Rule Of Law Conference: Global Issues And The Rule Of Law, Lord Chief Justice Nicholas Phillips Of Worth Matravers Sep 2007

Rule Of Law Conference: Global Issues And The Rule Of Law, Lord Chief Justice Nicholas Phillips Of Worth Matravers

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reading, Writing, And Race: The Constitutionality Of Educational Strategies Designed To Teach Racial Literacy, Michael J. Kaufman Mar 2007

Reading, Writing, And Race: The Constitutionality Of Educational Strategies Designed To Teach Racial Literacy, Michael J. Kaufman

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.