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Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei Oct 2018

Cracking Down On Cages: Feminist And Prison Abolitionist Considerations For Litigating Solitary Confinement In Canada, Winnie Phillips-Osei

Master of Laws Research Papers Repository

Guided by prison abolition ethic and intersectional feminism, my key argument is that Charter section 15 is the ideal means of eradicating solitary confinement and its adverse impact on women who are Aboriginal, racialized, mentally ill, or immigration detainees. I utilize a provincial superior court’s failing in exploring a discrimination analysis concerning Aboriginal women, to illustrate my key argument. However, because of the piecemeal fashion in which courts can effect developments in the law, the abolition of solitary confinement may very well occur through a series of ‘little wins’. In Chapter 11, I provide a constitutional analysis, arguing that ...


Sections 7 And 15 Of The Canadian Charter Of Rights And Freedoms In The Context Of The Clean Water Crisis On Reserves: Opportunities And Challenges For First Nations Women, Madiha Vallani Sep 2018

Sections 7 And 15 Of The Canadian Charter Of Rights And Freedoms In The Context Of The Clean Water Crisis On Reserves: Opportunities And Challenges For First Nations Women, Madiha Vallani

Master of Laws Research Papers Repository

This paper analyzes the water crisis on reserves through the lens of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Specifically, this paper discusses certain issues, stemming from the water crisis, that some First Nations women experience, through the lens of the Charter’s section 15 right to equality, and section 7 right to life, liberty, and security of the person. In doing so, this paper aims to draw attention to the various ways that the water crisis uniquely impacts First Nations women due to their intersectional experiences under the protected grounds of sex, ethnic origin, race, and residency on reserve ...