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The Judicial Safeguards Of Federalism, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Judicial Safeguards Of Federalism, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Federalism-Rights Nexus: Explaining Why Senate Democrats Tolerate Rehnquist Court Decision Making But Not The Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Federalism-Rights Nexus: Explaining Why Senate Democrats Tolerate Rehnquist Court Decision Making But Not The Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Same-Sex Marriage And The New Judicial Federalism: Why State Courts Should Not Consider Out-Of-State Backlash, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Same-Sex Marriage And The New Judicial Federalism: Why State Courts Should Not Consider Out-Of-State Backlash, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


When Can A State Sue The United States?, Tara Leigh Grove Sep 2019

When Can A State Sue The United States?, Tara Leigh Grove

Tara L. Grove

State suits against the federal government are on the rise. From Massachusetts’ challenge to federal environmental policy, to Oregon’s confrontation over physician-assisted suicide, to Texas’s suit over the Obama administration’s immigration program, States increasingly go to court to express their disagreement with federal policy. This Article offers a new theory of state standing that seeks to explain when a State may sue the United States. I argue that States have broad standing to sue the federal government to protect state law. Accordingly, a State may challenge federal statutes or regulations that preempt, or otherwise undermine the continued ...


Choice Of Law, The Constitution And Lochner, James Y. Stern Sep 2019

Choice Of Law, The Constitution And Lochner, James Y. Stern

James Y. Stern

No abstract provided.


An Organizational Account Of State Standing, Katherine Mims Crocker Sep 2019

An Organizational Account Of State Standing, Katherine Mims Crocker

Katherine Mims Crocker

Again and again in regard to recent high-profile disputes, the legal community has tied itself in knots over questions about when state plaintiffs should have standing to sue in federal court, especially in cases where they seek to sue federal-government defendants. Lawsuits challenging everything from the Bush administration’s environmental policies to the Obama administration’s immigration actions to the Trump administration’s travel bans have become mired in tricky and technical questions about whether state plaintiffs belonged in federal court.

Should state standing cause so much controversy and confusion? This Essay argues that state plaintiffs are far more like ...


Qualified Immunity And Constitutional Structure, Katherine Mims Crocker Sep 2019

Qualified Immunity And Constitutional Structure, Katherine Mims Crocker

Katherine Mims Crocker

A range of scholars has subjected qualified immunity to a wave of criticism— and for good reasons. But the Supreme Court continues to apply the doctrine in ever more aggressive ways. By advancing two claims, this Article seeks to make some sense of this conflict and to suggest some thoughts toward a resolution.

First, while the Court has offered and scholars have rejected several rationales for the doctrine, layering in an account grounded in structural constitutional concerns provides a historically richer and analytically thicker understanding of the current qualified-immunity regime. For suits against federal officials, qualified immunity acts as a ...


How State Supreme Courts Take Consequences Into Account: Toward A State-Centered Understanding Of State Constitutionalism, Neal Devins Sep 2019

How State Supreme Courts Take Consequences Into Account: Toward A State-Centered Understanding Of State Constitutionalism, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


How Congress Paved The Way For The Rehnquist Court's Federalism Revival: Lessons From The Federal Partial Birth Abortion Ban, Neal Devins Sep 2019

How Congress Paved The Way For The Rehnquist Court's Federalism Revival: Lessons From The Federal Partial Birth Abortion Ban, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Religious V. Secular Ideologies And Sex Education: A Response To Professors Cahn And Carbone, Vivian E. Hamilton Sep 2019

Religious V. Secular Ideologies And Sex Education: A Response To Professors Cahn And Carbone, Vivian E. Hamilton

Vivian E. Hamilton

No abstract provided.


Erie's International Effect, Michael S. Green Sep 2019

Erie's International Effect, Michael S. Green

Michael S. Green

To what extent does the Erie doctrine apply in an international context? In his article When Erie Goes International, Professor Childress argues that a federal court choosing between state law and the law of a foreign nation should often (or perhaps always) ignore Klaxon Co. v. Stentor Electric Manufacturing Co. and use federal choice of law rules rather than the rules of the state where the federal court is located.

In this Essay, I have three points to make in response. The first is that Childress’s article, even if successful, leaves the bulk of the Erie doctrine unchanged in ...


Constitutional Avoidance And The Roberts Court, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Constitutional Avoidance And The Roberts Court, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Constitution's Forgotten Cover Letter: An Essay On The New Federalism And The Original Understanding, Daniel A. Farber Aug 2019

The Constitution's Forgotten Cover Letter: An Essay On The New Federalism And The Original Understanding, Daniel A. Farber

Daniel A Farber

At the end of the summer of 1787, the Philadelphia Convention issued two documents. One was the Constitution itself. The other document, now almost forgotten even by constitutional historians, was an official letter to Congress, signed by George Washington on behalf of the Convention. Congress responded with a resolution that the Constitution and "letter accompanying the same" be sent to the state legislatures for submission to conventions in each state.

The Washington letter lacks the detail and depth of some other evidence of original intent. Being a cover letter, it was designed only to introduce the accompanying document rather than ...


Active Judicial Governance, James A. Gardner May 2019

Active Judicial Governance, James A. Gardner

James Gardner

Evidence marshaled in a new article by Jonathan Marshfield suggests strongly that unlike judges of U.S. federal courts, judges of American state supreme courts both recognize and embrace their role as active participants in the process of indirect popular self-rule. Consequently, they much more willingly serve as active and self-conscious vectors of governance. This is not to say that state judges lack appropriate judicial humility; it is to say merely that they possess a different and more nuanced understanding of the role of courts in American government than some of their federal counterparts.


Constitutional Challenges And Regulatory Opportunities For State Climate Policy Innovation, Felix Mormann Jun 2018

Constitutional Challenges And Regulatory Opportunities For State Climate Policy Innovation, Felix Mormann

Felix Mormann

This Article explores constitutional limits and regulatory openings for innovative state policies to mitigate climate change by promoting climate-friendly, renewable energy. In the absence of a comprehensive federal policy approach to climate change and clean energy, more and more states are stepping in to fill the policy void. Already, nearly thirty states have adopted renewable portfolio standards that create markets for solar, wind, and other clean electricity. To help populate these markets, a few pioneering states have recently started using feed-in tariffs that offer eligible generators above-market rates for their clean, renewable power.

But renewable portfolio standards, feed-in tariffs, and ...


Autonomy And Isomorphism: The Unfulfilled Promise Of Structural Autonomy In American State Constitutions, James A. Gardner Nov 2017

Autonomy And Isomorphism: The Unfulfilled Promise Of Structural Autonomy In American State Constitutions, James A. Gardner

James Gardner

In the American system of federalism, states have almost complete freedom to adopt institutions and practices of internal self-governance that they find best-suited to the needs and preferences of their citizens. Nevertheless, states have not availed themselves of these opportunities: the structural provisions of state constitutions tend to converge strongly with one another and with the U.S. Constitution. This paper examines two important periods of such convergence: the period from 1776 through the first few decades of the nineteenth century, when states were inventing institutions of democratic governance and representation; and the period following the Supreme Court’s one ...


The Rehnquist Revolution, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

The Rehnquist Revolution, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

[Excerpt] "When historians look back at the Rehnquist Court, without a doubt they will say that its greatest changes in constitutional law were in the area of federalism. Over the past decade, and particularly over the last five years, the Supreme Court has dramatically limited the scope of Congress’ powers and has greatly expanded the protection of state Sovereign Immunity. Virtually every area of law, criminal and civil, is touched by these changes. Since I began teaching constitutional law in 1980, the most significant differences in constitutional law are a result of the Supreme Court’s revival of federalism as ...


Empowering States: A Rebuttal To Dr. Greve, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

Empowering States: A Rebuttal To Dr. Greve, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


Empowering States: The Need To Limit Federal Preemption, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

Empowering States: The Need To Limit Federal Preemption, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

No abstract provided.


Rlupia And The Limits Of Religious Institutionalism, Zachary A. Bray Sep 2016

Rlupia And The Limits Of Religious Institutionalism, Zachary A. Bray

Zachary Bray

What special protections, if any, should religious organizations receive from local land use controls? The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”)—a deeply flawed statute—has been a magnet for controversy since its passage in 2000. Yet until recently, RLUIPA has played little role in debates about “religious institutionalism,” a set of ideas that suggest religious institutions play a distinctive role in developing the framework for religious liberty and that they deserve comparably distinctive deference and protection. This is starting to change: RLUIPA’s magnetic affinity for controversy has begun to connect conflicts over religious land use with ...


The Fourteenth Amendment And The Unconstitutionality Of Secession, Daniel A. Farber Aug 2016

The Fourteenth Amendment And The Unconstitutionality Of Secession, Daniel A. Farber

Daniel A Farber

To understand fully the relevance of the first two clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to secession, we need to examine the antebellum disputes about citizenship and sovereignty, the subject of Part II below. Issues about citizenship arose in the context of specific disputes about naturalization, expatriation, and the rights of freedmen, but they implicated conflicts over the seat of allegiance and the nature of the Union. Part III turns to the Reconstruction debates and shows how they reflect a fundamentally nationalistic view of citizenship. The Reconstruction Amendments to the Constitution were connected with a powerful vision of national citizenship and ...


Special Economic Zones In The United States: From Colonial Charters, To Foreign-Trade Zones, Toward Ussezs, Tom W. Bell Mar 2016

Special Economic Zones In The United States: From Colonial Charters, To Foreign-Trade Zones, Toward Ussezs, Tom W. Bell

Tom W. Bell

Special economic zones (SEZs) and the United States have a long and complicated relationship. The lineage of the United States runs back to proto-SEZs, created when Old World governments sold entrepreneurs charters to build for-profit colonies in the New World, such as Jamestown and New Amsterdam. In more recent times, though, the United States has lagged behind the rest of the world in tapping the potential of SEZs, which have exploded in number, types, territory, and population. True, the US hosts a large and growing number of Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZs), but these do little more than exempt select companies from ...


The Demise And Rise Of The Classical Paradigm In Canadian Federalism: Promoting Autonomy For The Provinces And The First Nations, Bruce Ryder Oct 2015

The Demise And Rise Of The Classical Paradigm In Canadian Federalism: Promoting Autonomy For The Provinces And The First Nations, Bruce Ryder

Bruce B. Ryder

The author explores the possibility of employing Canadian consitutional doctrine to develop a more flexible approach that would allow for greater provincial autonomy and First Nation self-government within the existing scheme of ss 91 and 92 jurisprudence. Canadian constitutional doctrine is first interpreted through the competing models of the classical and modem paradigms. The former emphasizes a sharp division of powers and has traditionally been used, the author argues, to invalidate legislation seen to interfere with the market economy. The modem paradigm, on the other hand, recognizes competing jurisdictions and has been used to uphold legislation focusing on morals. The ...


The Emergence Of Classical American Patent Law, Herbert Hovenkamp Aug 2015

The Emergence Of Classical American Patent Law, Herbert Hovenkamp

Herbert Hovenkamp

The Emergence of Classical Patent Law

Abstract

One enduring historical debate concerns whether the American Constitution was intended to be "classical" -- referring to a theory of statecraft that maximizes the role of private markets and minimizes the role of government in economic affairs. The most central and powerful proposition of classical constitutionalism is that the government's role in economic development should be minimal. First, private rights in property and contract exist prior to any community needs for development. Second, if a particular project is worthwhile the market itself will make it occur. Third, when the government attempts to induce ...


Globalization And Structure, Julian Ku, John Yoo May 2015

Globalization And Structure, Julian Ku, John Yoo

John C Yoo

No abstract provided.


Instrumental And Non-Instrumental Federalism, Michael C. Dorf Feb 2015

Instrumental And Non-Instrumental Federalism, Michael C. Dorf

Michael C. Dorf

No abstract provided.


The Relevance Of Federal Norms For State Separation Of Powers, Michael C. Dorf Feb 2015

The Relevance Of Federal Norms For State Separation Of Powers, Michael C. Dorf

Michael C. Dorf

No abstract provided.


No Federalists Here: Anti-Federalism And Nationalism On The Rehnquist Court, Michael C. Dorf Feb 2015

No Federalists Here: Anti-Federalism And Nationalism On The Rehnquist Court, Michael C. Dorf

Michael C. Dorf

No abstract provided.


The 2006 Winthrop And Frances Lane Lecture: The Unintended Legal And Policy Consequences Of The No Child Left Behind Act, Michael Heise Feb 2015

The 2006 Winthrop And Frances Lane Lecture: The Unintended Legal And Policy Consequences Of The No Child Left Behind Act, Michael Heise

Michael Heise

No abstract provided.


Separation Of Powers, Legislative Vetoes, And The Public Lands, Eugene R. Gaetke Dec 2014

Separation Of Powers, Legislative Vetoes, And The Public Lands, Eugene R. Gaetke

Eugene R. Gaetke

The Supreme Court's decision in Immigration and Naturalization Service v. Chadha struck a serious, if not fatal, blow to the constitutional acceptability of the legislative veto. In Chadha the Court held that a provision of the Immigration and Naturalization Act, which permitted one House of Congress to reverse a decision by the Attorney

General not to deport an alien, was a violation of the doctrine of separation of powers since it did not comply with the requirements of passage by both Houses of Congress and presentment to the President. In light of that decision, the constitutionality of nearly 200 ...