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The Unsuspected Francis Lieber, Richard Salomon May 2018

The Unsuspected Francis Lieber, Richard Salomon

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

"The Unsuspected Francis Lieber" examines paradoxes in the life and work of Francis Lieber. Lieber is best known as the author of the 1863 "Lieber Code," the War Department's General Order No. 100. It was the first modern statement of the law of armed conflict. This paper questions whether the Lieber Code was truly humanitarian, especially in view of its valorization of military necessity. Also reviewed is the contrast between the Code's extraordinarily favorable treatment of African-Americans and Lieber's personal history of slave-holding.

Lieber's shift from civil libertarian to authoritarian after 1857, as exemplified by his ...


Due Process And The Right To Legal Counsel For Unaccompanied Minors, Marielos G. Ramos May 2018

Due Process And The Right To Legal Counsel For Unaccompanied Minors, Marielos G. Ramos

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Unaccompanied minors arriving to the United States fleeing violence and seeking protection are apprehended, detained in facilities, and placed in removal proceedings in accordance with U.S. immigration laws. Like adults, these children have to appear in immigration court to fight deportation and must apply for any form of legal relief for which they may be eligible. However, removal proceedings work as a civil and not a criminal process, and immigration laws have established that while noncitizens have the right to an attorney, they are not entitled to legal counsel at the government’s expense. This thesis examines how the ...


Oops!... I Infringed Again: An Analysis Of U.S. Copyright And Its Intended Beneficiaries, Gabriele A. Forbes-Bennett Apr 2018

Oops!... I Infringed Again: An Analysis Of U.S. Copyright And Its Intended Beneficiaries, Gabriele A. Forbes-Bennett

Student Theses

This paper seeks to establish the reasons why federal copyright protection was created, discuss the shifts in reasoning behind major amendments, and explore its effects on copyright holders and the public, with a slight focus on the music industry. Federal copyright has existed in the United States since the late 1700s, with the creation of the Copyright Act in 1790. Adopted from the first copyright law ever created, the English Statute of Anne (1710), the Copyright Act was meant to protect citizens from piracy in a world where the risk of such a thing was rapidly increasing. The stated objective ...


New Approaches To Data-Driven Civilian Oversight Of Law Enforcement: An Introduction To The Second Nacole/Cjpr Special Issue, Daniel L. Stageman, Nicole M. Napolitano, Brian Buchner Sep 2016

New Approaches To Data-Driven Civilian Oversight Of Law Enforcement: An Introduction To The Second Nacole/Cjpr Special Issue, Daniel L. Stageman, Nicole M. Napolitano, Brian Buchner

Publications and Research

In April of 2016, National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement (NACOLE) and John Jay College partnered to sponsor the Academic Symposium “Building Public Trust: Generating Evidence to Enhance Police Accountability and Legitimacy.” This essay introduces the Criminal Justice Policy Review Special Issue featuring peer-reviewed, empirical research papers first presented at the Symposium. We provide context for the Symposium in relation to contemporary national discourse on police accountability and legitimacy. In addition, we review each of the papers presented at the Symposium, and provide in-depth reviews of each of the manuscripts included in the Special Issue.


Public Interest Lawyering & Judicial Politics: Four Cases Worth A Second Look In Williams-Yulee V. The Florida Bar, Ruthann Robson Jan 2015

Public Interest Lawyering & Judicial Politics: Four Cases Worth A Second Look In Williams-Yulee V. The Florida Bar, Ruthann Robson

Publications and Research

This "First Look" Essay argues that the Court should consider public interest lawyering when it decides a First Amendment challenge to the Canon prohibiting judicial candidates from soliciting money in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar. It suggests that four cases are worth a "second look": Republican Party of Minnesota v. White (2002); Caperton v. A.T. Massey Coal Co. (2009); Shelley v. Kraemer (1948); and a Florida Supreme Court case involving discipline of a judge, In re Hawkins.


Due Process And The Failure Of The Criminal Court, Steven Zeidman Jan 2015

Due Process And The Failure Of The Criminal Court, Steven Zeidman

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Hollingsworth V. Perry: Standing Over Constitutional Rights, Caitlin E. Borgmann Nov 2013

Hollingsworth V. Perry: Standing Over Constitutional Rights, Caitlin E. Borgmann

City University of New York Law Review

No abstract provided.


Thirteen False Blackbirds, Ruthann Robson Jan 2013

Thirteen False Blackbirds, Ruthann Robson

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


State Courts And Constitutional Socio- Economic Rights: Exploring The Underutilization Thesis, Stephen Loffredo, Helen Herschkoff Jan 2011

State Courts And Constitutional Socio- Economic Rights: Exploring The Underutilization Thesis, Stephen Loffredo, Helen Herschkoff

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Appellate Review Of Social Facts In Constitutional Rights Cases, Caitlin E. Borgmann Jan 2010

Appellate Review Of Social Facts In Constitutional Rights Cases, Caitlin E. Borgmann

Publications and Research

There is great confusion among scholars and courts about whether and when appellate courts may, or must, defer to trial courts' findings of social fact in constitutional rights cases. The Supreme Court has never directly decided the question and indeed has addressed it only once, in passing. A common assumption, promoted by scholars and adopted as binding by some circuits, is that the deferential, "clearly erroneous" standard of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 52(a)(6) does not apply to social facts. This Article challenges that assumption. There is nothing in the text of the rule that supports this conclusion ...


No Direction Home: Will The Law Keep Pace With Human Tracking Technology To Protect Individual Privacy And Stop Geoslavery, William A. Herbert Jul 2006

No Direction Home: Will The Law Keep Pace With Human Tracking Technology To Protect Individual Privacy And Stop Geoslavery, William A. Herbert

Publications and Research

Increasingly, public and private employers are utilizing human tracking devices to monitor employee movement and conduct. Due to the propensity of American labor law to give greater weight toemployer property interests over most employee privacy expectations, there are currently few limitations on the use of human tracking in employment. The scope and nature of current legal principles regarding individual privacy are not sufficient to respond to the rapid development and use of human tracking technology. The academic use of the phrase “geoslavery” to describe the abusive use of such technology underscores its power. This article examines the use of such ...


Surreptitious Search Warrants And The Usa Patriot Act: "Thinking Outside The Box But Within The Constitution," Or A Violation Of Fourth Amendment Protections?, Robert M. Duncan Jr. Apr 2004

Surreptitious Search Warrants And The Usa Patriot Act: "Thinking Outside The Box But Within The Constitution," Or A Violation Of Fourth Amendment Protections?, Robert M. Duncan Jr.

City University of New York Law Review

No abstract provided.