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Looking For My Self: Identity-Driven Attention Allocation, Nicole V. Coleman, Patti Williams Jul 2015

Looking For My Self: Identity-Driven Attention Allocation, Nicole V. Coleman, Patti Williams

Marketing Papers

This research builds on the motivational aspects of identity salience, finding that social identities direct the allocation of attention in identity‐syntonic ways. Drawing from identity‐based motivation (Oyserman, 2009; Reed, et al., 2012) we suggest individuals use attention to enhance identity‐fit; selectively focusing on cues and stimuli that are identity‐consistent. In two studies we find that activating a social identity drives preferential attention toward identity‐relevant stimuli. Using a novel paradigm, Study 1 demonstrates that individuals strategically focus attention on identity‐consistent emotional stimuli, while also shifting attention away from identity‐inconsistent emotional stimuli. Using a dot ...


I Judge, Therefore I React: An Experimental Investigation Of Acceptance, Jennifer Ann Shaver Jul 2015

I Judge, Therefore I React: An Experimental Investigation Of Acceptance, Jennifer Ann Shaver

Theses and Dissertations

The present study was designed to provide empirical tests of some of the mechanisms thought to operate in mindfulness-based treatments. Specifically, I tested the hypothesis that appraising distress judgmentally (as a needless and useless indication of personal weakness) would be associated with experiencing meta-distress (e.g., feeling ashamed about being distressed), which would, in turn, be associated with increased experiential avoidance (i.e., suppression or distraction from the distress) and shorter distress tolerance. In addition, I examined the hypothesis that compassionately appraising distress (as normal, understandable, and potentially a source of growth) would be associated with spending more time curiously ...


The Effects Of Alcohol On The Interpretation Of Social And Emotional Cues: A Field Study Of College Student Drinking, Emotion Recognition, And Perceptions Of A Hypothetical Sexual Assault, Alexander James Melkonian Jul 2015

The Effects Of Alcohol On The Interpretation Of Social And Emotional Cues: A Field Study Of College Student Drinking, Emotion Recognition, And Perceptions Of A Hypothetical Sexual Assault, Alexander James Melkonian

Theses and Dissertations

Alcohol use and abuse among emerging adults is highly correlated with increased risk for sexual victimization. Alcohol myopia theory has been used to explain impairments in Social information processing resulting in decreased attention to environmental Social cues including risk factors for sexual assault as well as facial emotional recognition. Those with deficits in Social information processing may be at particular risk for the misperception of salient risk factors for sexual assault by victims, perpetrators, and bystanders when intoxicated. In this naturalistic field study, participants who had been consuming alcohol were recruited to engage in tasks of facial emotion recognition and ...


Age Differences In The Impact Of Emotional Cues On Subsequent Target Detection, Brandon Wade Coffey Jul 2015

Age Differences In The Impact Of Emotional Cues On Subsequent Target Detection, Brandon Wade Coffey

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

Emotional cues within the environment capture our attention and influence how we perceive our surroundings. Past research has shown that emotional cues presented before the detection of a perceptual gap can actually impair the perception of elementary visual features (e.g., the lack of detail creating a spatial gap) while simultaneously improving the perception of fast temporal features of vision (e.g., the rapid onset, offset, and re-emergence of a stimulus). This effect has been attributed to amygdalar enhancements of visual inputs conveying emotional features along magnocellular channels. The current study compared participants’ ability to detect spatial and temporal gaps ...


Does Our Fear Of Death Stem From Threatened Belongingness?, Stan Treger Jun 2015

Does Our Fear Of Death Stem From Threatened Belongingness?, Stan Treger

College of Science and Health Theses and Dissertations

In this dissertation, I examine the relative contribution to worldview defense (i.e., upholding one’s cultural worldviews) provided by the thoughts of one’s death and perceptions of curbed close relationships.

The need to belong, to form meaningful and strong ties with others, is what many social psychologists believe to be one of the most fundamental and strongest motivations that humans possess (Baumeister, 2012; Baumeister & Leary, 1995; Kenrick, Griskevicius, Neuberg, & Schaller, 2010; Tomasello, 2014). The human brain is “hard-wired” to be around others (Beckes & Coan, 2011). In fact, large social group sizes of humans’ evolutionary past may have contributed to the large brain that modern humans possess today—a large brain with high cognitive ability is required to solve complex social problems such as attributing others’ mental states (Dunbar, 1998, 2003, 2009). Terror Management Theory (Greenberg & Arndt, 2012; Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1986), however, suggests that humans’ high cognitive ability also allows for knowledge that death will inevitably arrive one day. This knowledge creates a state of “paralyzing” anxiety and drives what Terror Management Theorists believe to be the most fundamental of human motives: avoiding death. To overcome this anxiety, persons turn to their cultural worldviews to boost their self-esteem and assuage the existential crisis evoked by the thought of death.

Although Terror Management Theory has received an impressive array of empirical support since its introduction, it has left one particular and important question unaddressed: why is it that humans fear death? Rather, Terror Management Theory simply assumes that humans do so. One possible reason behind this fear reflects the human need to belong. Being ostracized or excluded by others may be one of the most painful experiences humans may face, physically and cognitively. For example, being ostracized can decrease one’s of meaning (Stillman, Baumeister, Lambert, Crescioni, DeWall, & Fincham, 2009). Distress following social exclusion may even equate to experiencing physical pain (e.g., DeWall & Baumeister, 2006; MacDonald & Leary, 2005). The negative effects of ostracism may extend to simply observing others being excluded (Wesselman, Bagg, & Williams, 2009). Collectively, the physical, emotional, and cognitive distress following ostracism is strong enough for some to call ostracism “social death” (Case & Williams, 2004; Williams, 2007a).

In this dissertation, I propose that “social” and “actual” death may not be too ...


Relative Reward Effects On Operant Behavior: Incentive Contrast,Induction And Variety Effects, Howard Cromwell May 2015

Relative Reward Effects On Operant Behavior: Incentive Contrast,Induction And Variety Effects, Howard Cromwell

Howard Casey Cromwell

Comparing different rewards automatically produces dynamic relative outcome effects on behavior. Eachnew outcome exposure is to an updated version evaluated relative to alternatives. Relative reward effectsinclude incentive contrast, positive induction and variety effects. The present study utilized a novelbehavioral design to examine relative reward effects on a chain of operant behavior using auditory cues.Incentive contrast is the most often examined effect and focuses on increases or decreases in behavioralperformance after value upshifts (positive) or downshifts (negative) relative to another outcome. Weexamined the impact of comparing two reward outcomes in a repeated measures design with three ses-sions: a single outcome ...


The Effects Of Interpersonal And Noninterpersonal Loss On Music Preference, Alberte Bjornsson May 2015

The Effects Of Interpersonal And Noninterpersonal Loss On Music Preference, Alberte Bjornsson

Psychology

Through a series of studies, Lee, Andrade, and Palmer (2013) predicted and found that sadness caused by an interpersonal loss creates greater preference for listening to mood-congruent music than sadness caused by a noninterpersonal loss. However, in their experimental procedures, they inadvertently confounded the intensity of the sadness induced in the noninterpersonal and interpersonal sadness conditions, such that the interpersonal sadness condition created stronger feelings of sadness. The current study sought to replicate Lee et al.’s (2013) findings with the modification of unconfounding the intensity of sadness in the interpersonal and noninterpersonal conditions. After controlling for intensity, this study ...


The Effects Of Age And Task On Visual Emotion Processing, Nicole Elaine Chambers May 2015

The Effects Of Age And Task On Visual Emotion Processing, Nicole Elaine Chambers

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

Younger adults’ perception of and attention to facial stimuli are enhanced by positive and negative emotional expressions, with negativity leading to a greater benefit than positivity. Conversely, older adults demonstrate a positivity bias, devoting more attention to positive stimuli and less to negative. It is unclear if age differences in these attentional preferences emerge due to differences in how their perceptual systems respond to positive and negative stimuli. Emotional facial expressions elicit enhanced P1 and N170 components of visually-evoked event-related potentials (ERP) over posterior scalp regions associated with vision. The current study examined the extent to which angry and happy ...


A Detailed Investigation Of Facial Expression Processing In Congenital Prosopagnosia As Compared To Acquired Prosopagnosia, Kate Humphreys, Galia Avidan, Marlene Behrmann Apr 2015

A Detailed Investigation Of Facial Expression Processing In Congenital Prosopagnosia As Compared To Acquired Prosopagnosia, Kate Humphreys, Galia Avidan, Marlene Behrmann

Marlene Behrmann

Whether the ability to recognize facial expression can be preserved in the absence of the recognition of facial identity remains controversial. The current study reports the results of a detailed investigation of facial expression recognition in three congenital prosopagnosic (CP) participants, in comparison with two patients with acquired prosopagnosia (AP) and a large group of 30 neurologically normal participants, including individually age- and gender-matched controls. Participants completed a fine-grained expression recognition paradigm requiring a six-alternative forced-choice response to continua of morphs of six different basic facial expressions (e.g. happiness and surprise). Accuracy, sensitivity and reaction times were measured. The ...


A Fine-Grained Analysis Of Facial Expression Processing In High-Functioning Adults With Autism, Kate Humphreys, Nancy Minshew, Grace Leonard, Marlene Behrmann Apr 2015

A Fine-Grained Analysis Of Facial Expression Processing In High-Functioning Adults With Autism, Kate Humphreys, Nancy Minshew, Grace Leonard, Marlene Behrmann

Marlene Behrmann

It is unclear whether individuals with autism are impaired at recognizing basic facial expressions, and whether, if any impairment exists, it applies to expression processing in general, or to certain expressions, in particular. To evaluate these alternatives, we adopted a fine-grained analysis of facial expression processing in autism. Specifically, we used the ‘facial expression megamix’ paradigm [Young, A. W., Rowland, D., Calder, A. J, Etcoff, N. L., Seth, A., & Perrett, D. I. (1997). Facial expression megamix: Tests of dimensional and category accounts of emotion recognition Cognition and Emotion, 14, 39–60] in which adults with autism and a typically developing ...


Animal Cognition, Kristin Andrews, Ljiljana Radenovic Apr 2015

Animal Cognition, Kristin Andrews, Ljiljana Radenovic

Kristin Andrews, PhD

Debates in applied ethics about the proper treatment of animals often refer to empirical data about animal cognition, emotion, and behavior. In addition, there is increasing interest in the question of whether any nonhuman animal could be something like a moral agent.


The Virtual Self: Avatar And Individual Determinants Of Mood, Ivana Wang, Steven Rouse Dr., Elizabeth Krumrei-Mancuso Dr. Mar 2015

The Virtual Self: Avatar And Individual Determinants Of Mood, Ivana Wang, Steven Rouse Dr., Elizabeth Krumrei-Mancuso Dr.

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

We explored the potential of avatar-based games as a method of influencing mood. Factors such as avatar customization, participants’ perception of accurate avatar-self representation, self-esteem, and personality were assessed in relation to changes in affect following avatar game play.

With technology dominating the culture of the current day, it’s no surprise that people are becoming increasingly more concerned with their online persona. Most often, this impression is managed via an avatar, which through customization can become an accurate translation of the individual who created it (actual-self) or instead portray the self that he or she wants to be (ideal-self ...


Does Emotional Processing Mediate The Link Between Disordered Sleep And Depression?, Kimberly O'Leary Mar 2015

Does Emotional Processing Mediate The Link Between Disordered Sleep And Depression?, Kimberly O'Leary

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Disordered sleep is strongly linked to depression, but reasons for this are not well understood. One possibility is that this link is partially explained by deficits in the emotional processing system. This model is substantiated based on the strong link between sleep and emotions, as well as ties between affect and depression. Therefore, this study tested whether various emotional and non-emotional deficits mediated the link between poor sleep quality and depression. Two hundred undergraduate students were recruited via an online university system. Participants completed self-report scales of depression, sleep quality, emotion recognition, and affective response to pre-tested pleasant or unpleasant ...


The Theoretical And Psychological Foundations Of Care In Environmental Ethics, Rachel Fedock Feb 2015

The Theoretical And Psychological Foundations Of Care In Environmental Ethics, Rachel Fedock

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

I investigate the phenomenon of care, provide some of the theoretical and psychological framework for the ethics of care, and apply this framework to environmental issues. The neglected dimensions of care I explore are: the emotions of care, care as a virtue, and the caring person, respectively, while constructing possible conceptions of in what each dimension consists. I argue for the necessity of sympathy and concern within the ethics of care, while arguing against the necessity of empathy. Next, I explore the virtue of care as an ideal, where emotions, desires, reasoning, motive, duty and action all play an important ...


Physiological And Subjective Aspects Of Positive Mood In Relation To Executive Functioning: The Potential Moderating Role Of Personality, Luz Helena Ospina Feb 2015

Physiological And Subjective Aspects Of Positive Mood In Relation To Executive Functioning: The Potential Moderating Role Of Personality, Luz Helena Ospina

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Positive affect has been demonstrated to improve aspects of cognition. However, recent studies reveal that positive affect may hinder the same cognitive processes, such as executive functioning, memory and creativity. These discrepant findings may be due to differing levels of physiological arousal, a component of the circumplex model of affect, which has been largely ignored in affective research. For example, one recent study suggests that positive valence coupled with varying levels of physiological arousal (i.e., low, moderate, and high) may differentially affect performance on tasks of verbal fluency and memory. Furthermore, one other explanation for these inconsistent findings may ...


Mutability Of The Green-Eyed Monster: A Functional Approach To Understanding The Distinction Between Benign And Hostile Envy, Rachael G. Falcon Jan 2015

Mutability Of The Green-Eyed Monster: A Functional Approach To Understanding The Distinction Between Benign And Hostile Envy, Rachael G. Falcon

Psychology ETDs

Envy functions in resource competition situations in which a competitor out-competes oneself in a fitness relevant domain (Hill & Buss, 2006, 2008). Research suggests that there are two types of envy, a hostile version, aimed at depriving the envied person of his or her advantage, and a benign version, aimed at gaining an advantage for oneself (Parrott, 1991; van de Ven, Zeelenberg, & Pieters, 2009). Three predictions were derived from the hypothesis that the selection of envy type is functional, taking into account the costs and benefits of a benign versus a hostile response: 1) Hostile envy was expected to be more likely when the advantage cant be acquired without taking it from the envied. 2) Benign envy was expected to be more likely when the relationship with the envied person is highly valuable to the envier. 3) Benign envy was expected to be more likely when the social environment favors the envied person. Additionally, the emotions experienced as part of envy were proposed to mediate the relationships between elements of the situation and responses to envy. Using a daily diary method, participants described their everyday experiences of envy, which were categorized as benign or hostile based on taxometric and latent class analyses. Prediction 1 was fully supported and prediction 2 was largely supported. Prediction 3 was not supported; instead participants' beliefs about the envied person's deservingness directly affected envy type. Mediation analyses supported the proposal that emotions mediate the relationships between situations and responses. The degree to which the envied person's possession of the advantage makes it harder for the envier to get emerged as an important factor in how one responds to hostile envy.


Consumer Evaluation: Describing Construal-Level Theory And A Role Of Emotion On Human’S Thinking Processing Style, Junga Lee Jan 2015

Consumer Evaluation: Describing Construal-Level Theory And A Role Of Emotion On Human’S Thinking Processing Style, Junga Lee

Master's Theses

Based on emotion and construal level theory, this study examined the influence of emotion on consumer decision-making. Participants were induced into happy or sad moods by describing a past happy or sad life event. Then they were asked to read one of two smartphone advertisements. One advertisement emphasized only central features of smartphone, and the other one emphasized only secondary features. The dependent variables were participants’ attitudes toward the advertisements, purchase intention of the smartphone in the advertisement, and willingness to pay for the smartphone. Based on the connection between emotion and construal level, I predicted that due to their ...


Angry Abolitionists & The Rhetoric Of Slavery: Minding The Moral Emotions In Social Movements, Benjamin Lamb-Books Jan 2015

Angry Abolitionists & The Rhetoric Of Slavery: Minding The Moral Emotions In Social Movements, Benjamin Lamb-Books

Sociology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Although emotion is increasingly central in theories of social change, the sociology of social movements and emotion continues to have a mix-and-stir quality. Through a microanalysis of abolitionist discourse, this dissertation observes how the two are systematically intertwined by status claimsmaking processes. To better explore the affective dynamics of protest rhetoric through which `social movements move,' I construct a new synthetic theory of status as a moral-emotional resource, dependent upon cultural imaginaries and negotiated through rhetorical implicatures. Status-oriented moral emotions--including the egocentric and altruistic types of anger examined in this case study--can be aroused, altered, and rechanneled toward reform causes ...


Lost Or Fond? Effects Of Nostalgia On Sad Mood Recovery Vary By Attachment Insecurity, Sarah R. Cavanagh, Ryan J. Glode, Philipp C. Opitz Jan 2015

Lost Or Fond? Effects Of Nostalgia On Sad Mood Recovery Vary By Attachment Insecurity, Sarah R. Cavanagh, Ryan J. Glode, Philipp C. Opitz

Psychology Department Faculty Works

Nostalgia involves a fond recollection of people and events lost to time. Growing evidence indicates that nostalgia may ameliorate negative affective states such as loneliness and boredom. However, the effect of nostalgia on sadness is unknown, and there is little research on how social connectedness might impact nostalgia's effects. Grounded in a theoretical framework whereby people with lower levels of attachment insecurity benefit more from nostalgia, we exposed participants to a mortality-related sad mood and then randomly assigned them to reflect on a nostalgic or an ordinary event memory. We examined changes in mood and electrodermal activity (EDA) and ...


Eeg Investigation Of Mirror-Neuron Activity Before And After Conscious Perception Of Emotion In Faces, Katie Singsank Jan 2015

Eeg Investigation Of Mirror-Neuron Activity Before And After Conscious Perception Of Emotion In Faces, Katie Singsank

Summer Research

While it is theorized that the human Mirror Neuron System (MNS) is used in action understanding and interpretation, how mu-wave suppression varies throughout the process of becoming conscious of a human facial expression and perceiving it has not been investigated. In the current study, EEG mu-wave suppression was used as an index of MNS activity. Data were collected while subjects viewed a 6 second clip in which static visual noise lifted over a period of 3 seconds revealing either a sad or angry face below which participants were asked to indicate the emotion with a keyboard button press. The image ...


Remembering That Neutral Feeling? Enhanced Memory For Neutral, But Not Positive Or Negative, Emotional Stimuli In Bipolar I Disorder, Gaia Cooper Jan 2015

Remembering That Neutral Feeling? Enhanced Memory For Neutral, But Not Positive Or Negative, Emotional Stimuli In Bipolar I Disorder, Gaia Cooper

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is associated with heightened and persistent positive emotion (Gruber, 2011; Johnson, 2005). Yet we know less about underlying cognitive processes that may influence these observed biases in emotionality. One promising approach is to examine cognitive processes, such as declarative memory, that may serve as an important window into understanding how individuals with BD remember emotion-laden stimuli. The current study presented standardized positive, negative and neutral emotion eliciting images to remitted BD I adults (n=26) and healthy controls (CTL; n=24) and measured accuracy in recall after a subsequent 60-minute delay ...


Understanding Emotion In Relation To Drinking Motivation, Melissa C. Hinely Jan 2015

Understanding Emotion In Relation To Drinking Motivation, Melissa C. Hinely

University Honors Program Theses

Recent research has uncovered the interactions between implicit alcohol motivations and drinking behaviors after emotion inductions (Ostafin & Brooks, 2011). However, little research has supplemented such findings. This longitudinal two-part study examined the impact of a personalized emotion induction on implicit alcohol-related associations in a college sample enrolled at southern university. 215 participants were randomly assigned to one of three emotion-induction conditions (negative, neutral, or positive). During phase I, participants completed a baseline Implicit Association Tests (IAT; Greenwald et al., 1998) to assess implicit alcohol-related cognitions related to valence and motivation. Based on condition, participants were also asked to describe in detail a recent negative, neutral, or positive experience that would later be used to induce emotion in phase II. 88 participants returned for phase II. Participants listened to an individualized guided imagery recording intended to induce the emotion of their assigned condition. The same IATs from phase I were administered post-emotion induction. Due insufficient power, significant changes in alcohol-related ...


Impacts Of Distraction On Driving: An Analysis Of Physical, Cognitive, And Emotional Distraction, Jason Sterkenburg Jan 2015

Impacts Of Distraction On Driving: An Analysis Of Physical, Cognitive, And Emotional Distraction, Jason Sterkenburg

Dissertations, Master's Theses and Master's Reports - Open

Traditionally, driver distraction has been categorized into four types: visual, biomechanical, auditory, and cognitive. However, the place of emotion in distracted driving research is undefined. This research investigates the influence of emotional distraction on driving performance. In total, seventy-eight participants were recruited and placed into one of four conditions: physical (visual-biomechanical), cognitive (cognitive- auditory), emotional (anger), and control. The results demonstrated that emotional distraction degrades driving performance as much as or more than other distraction types. The causes for these results, underlying mechanisms, and other considerations are mentioned in the discussion section.


Color Me, Please: How Color-Emotion Pairs Affect Our Perceptions, Russell T. Rogers Jan 2015

Color Me, Please: How Color-Emotion Pairs Affect Our Perceptions, Russell T. Rogers

University Honors Program Theses

Color-emotion pairings are part of everyday experience, and they develop in early childhood. Emotional experiences are typically much stronger when emotional stimuli (e.g., pictures or videos) are paired with sensory stimuli (e.g., sights or sounds). Since the presence of these sensory stimuli seems to heighten the emotional experience of emotion-evoking visual stimuli, it should be the case that such pairings will allow the manipulation of color-emotion pairings through the presence of a color (a visual stimulus) during an emotional situation (such as watching a video). In this study (N = 44), we paired both a positive and negative video ...


Too Close For Comfort? Social Distance And Positive Emotion Perception In Bipolar I Disorder, Joseph William Fischer Jan 2015

Too Close For Comfort? Social Distance And Positive Emotion Perception In Bipolar I Disorder, Joseph William Fischer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is associated with heightened and persistent positive emotion (Gruber, 2011; Johnson, 2005). Yet we know less about how troubled emotion responding may translate into dynamic face-to-face interactions involving others, especially in contexts where automatic social regulation of personal distance from others is key to maintaining social boundaries. Using a novel distance paradigm adapted from prior work (Adolphs et al., 2009) participants with a history of bipolar I disorder (BD; n = 30) and healthy controls (CTL; n = 31) provided online measurements of social distance preferences in response to positive, negative and neutral ...


The Effects Of The Emotional State On An Observer In The Face In The Crowd Paradigm, Kale A. Hubert Jan 2015

The Effects Of The Emotional State On An Observer In The Face In The Crowd Paradigm, Kale A. Hubert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The face in the crowd paradigm refers to a particular visual search task in which participants are asked to identify target facial expressions in a crowd of distractors. Previous research in this vein has suggested performance is enhanced for angry faces, an anger-superiority effect. There is however disagreement in many of these findings, and this disagreement may partly be explained by a failure to recognize the role of observer mood, response bias, and discrimination ability in the paradigm. The present study used a face in the crowd visual search task and assessed participant mood state using the Positive and Negative ...


The Effect Of Emotion On Associative And Item Memory, Priyanga Jeyarathnarajah Jan 2015

The Effect Of Emotion On Associative And Item Memory, Priyanga Jeyarathnarajah

Theses and Dissertations (Comprehensive)

Numerous studies to date have demonstrated superior memory for emotional compared to neutral stimuli (Kensinger & Corkin, 2004; Bennion et al., 2013). This finding, although relatively stable across the item memory literature, becomes less consistent when examined in tasks measuring memory for associative or source information (Chiu et al., 2013). For this reason, the present study set out to examine how emotional content (negative, positive and neutral word pairs) influences memory in two distinct associative and item recognition tasks: associative identification (AI), associative reinstatement (AR), paired-item recognition, and single-item recognition. In measuring the influence of emotion on associations using an explicit (AI) and ...


Parenting Behaviors Of Sleepy Parents: Associations With Emotion Regulation And Stress, Lauren R. Gilbert Jan 2015

Parenting Behaviors Of Sleepy Parents: Associations With Emotion Regulation And Stress, Lauren R. Gilbert

Theses and Dissertations--Psychology

Over the last decade, the topic of sleep has garnered a great deal of interest from psychologists, due to the physiological, emotional, and behavioral outcomes associated with its deprivation. However, questions remain to be answered regarding sleep's influence in the day-to-day life of families. The current study examines the importance of sleep deprivation for parents’ parenting behaviors during problem solving discussions with their children; emotion regulation and stress reactivity are examined as mediators of these associations. Participants were 196 families with a child between the ages of 6-11. Parents filled out diaries for 7 days prior to their in-lab ...


Young Adult Children’S Communicative Management Of Emotions About Divorce And Divorce Disclosures: Creating And Applying A New Measure, Jenna Shimkowski Jan 2015

Young Adult Children’S Communicative Management Of Emotions About Divorce And Divorce Disclosures: Creating And Applying A New Measure, Jenna Shimkowski

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Although scholars have examined the impacts of divorce on children, there has been little research focused on how children communicatively manage and make sense of their emotions following the divorce. Theoretically, the communication field is lacking in the knowledge of ways in which children of divorce handle the emotions that can arise in their new family system. This dissertation consists of two studies. Study 1 included identifying the strategies that young adult children report using to manage their emotions regarding parents’ divorce and creating a new measure based on children’s reports of these management strategies. Young adults reported using ...


The Effects Of Emotion And Action On Binding In Memory, Kacie Mennie Jan 2015

The Effects Of Emotion And Action On Binding In Memory, Kacie Mennie

LSU Master's Theses

The ability to successfully bind features and objects at different levels of abstraction is important for everyday functioning of memory. The current study examined how actions and emotional arousal influence item recognition and between-item binding across two experiments. According to the Arousal-Biased Competition Theory (ABC; Mather and Sutherland, 2011), binding can be enhanced by emotional arousal, depending upon what is the focus of attention within a scene. In the current study, participants viewed a series of slides, each of which depicted a person performing an action with an object, as well as an object that is not interacted with. All ...