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Psychology

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Emotion

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An Empirical Investigation Of The Adaptive Nature Of Shame, Elizabeth Jacqueline Dansie May 2009

An Empirical Investigation Of The Adaptive Nature Of Shame, Elizabeth Jacqueline Dansie

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Throughout the empirical psychological literature on emotion, the general consensus is that shame is maladaptive, while guilt is the adaptive moral emotion. Conversely, evolutionary psychology concludes that all emotions serve adaptive functions. Specifically, shame serves an appeasement function in social relationships. In order to investigate the true nature of shame, the current study used an experimental design. Specifically, a 2 (high shame, no shame) X 2 (high guilt, no guilt) design with a no-mistakes control group was implemented, and shame and guilt were operationalized through an evolutionary lens (i.e., shame as a nonverbal display, guilt as verbalizations of apology ...


Interpersonal Aspects Of Attribution And Emotion, Chris L. Treadwell May 1999

Interpersonal Aspects Of Attribution And Emotion, Chris L. Treadwell

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In Weiner's attributional perspective on emotion, recipients appraise outcomes in terms of three attributional dimensions--locus, controllability, and stability. The specific pattern of inferred attributions determines the nature of the resulting emotional experience. Weiner further claims that a sender's own emotion may serve as a precipitating event for a receiver's resulting attributions and emotions. Parkinson critiques the notion that there are inflexible or unique links among senders' emotions, the attributions conveyed by senders' emotions, and the resulting attributions or emotions aroused in recipients. Parkinson implies instead that the nature of the interpersonal relationship between senders and receivers, independent ...