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Teaching Ecological Ethics, Mark C. Wallace, Dan Perry, Gad Perry, Howard Curzer, Peter Muhlberger 2010 Texas Tech University

Teaching Ecological Ethics, Mark C. Wallace, Dan Perry, Gad Perry, Howard Curzer, Peter Muhlberger

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Wildlife researchers and managers frequently have to contend with difficult ethical questions during the course of their work, but currently lack an explicit scholarly forum to help them analyze the complicated ethical situations they encounter in the field, the laboratory, or conservation area. Since neither environmental ethics, nor animal ethics, nor research ethics currently addresses the tradeoff problems peculiar to wildlife research and management, a new field is needed. It must be the interdisciplinary product of organized and on‐going discussions across the natural sciences, social sciences, the humanities, and the conservation professions. Minteer and Collins (2005) proposed the creation ...


Evolution Of A Client­ Based Capstone Course, Jay Sullivan 2010 Virginia Tech

Evolution Of A Client­ Based Capstone Course, Jay Sullivan

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Project‐based senior capstone courses are a common part of natural resources curricula around the US, often providing undergraduate students with a “real‐world” experience prior to graduation, and provided educational programs with a means of conducting outcome assessments. At Virginia Tech, we have conducted a client‐focused forestry capstone course since 1999, and completed nearly 120 projects for actual clients from in and around Virginia. The evolution of the course and lessons (successes and flops) learned from our experience with student groups, clients, projects, and faculty involvement will be discussed. Future opportunities and directions in an evolving curriculum will ...


The Natural Resources Distance Learning Consortium, Kieran J. Lindsey, William C. Woodland Jr., Robert Bush 2010 Virginia Tech

The Natural Resources Distance Learning Consortium, Kieran J. Lindsey, William C. Woodland Jr., Robert Bush

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

The NRDLC, an organization formed in 2003 with the support of USDA‐Forest Service, delivers courses to web‐based learners who are either currently working in the natural resource professions or who are hoping to enter the field. Currently the organization consists of 10 accredited university members as well as various federal agency partners. NRDL members offer over 350 distance learning courses, 11 degrees, and 18 certificates. Kieran Lindsey, the NRDLC director, will present an overview of the organization, its history, and its impact. Additionally, Bill Woodland, National Partnership & Volunteers Program Manager at USDA‐Forest Service, will discuss the needs ...


Survey Of Forest Engineering And Forest Operations Programs In North America, Elisabeth M. Dodson, Chad Bolding, Ben Spong 2010 University of Montana

Survey Of Forest Engineering And Forest Operations Programs In North America, Elisabeth M. Dodson, Chad Bolding, Ben Spong

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

In 1999 the International Journal of Forest Engineering published a special edition titled “Forest Engineering – Looking Ahead Ten Years.” The lead article was “Graduate programs in forest engineering and forest operations: working towards extinction.” McNeel, Stokes, and Brinker surveyed graduate programs in North America that have named graduate programs in forest engineering and forest operations (FE/FO) with a primary focus on PhD‐level graduates. Concerns were raised over the low numbers of PhD graduates, aging FE/FO faculty, and declining employment opportunities for PhDs within traditional forest industry. These issues are still of significant concern; therefore, we propose to ...


Human Dimensions And Civic Engagement In The Natural Resources Classroom, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville, George Mehaffy 2010 Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture

Human Dimensions And Civic Engagement In The Natural Resources Classroom, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville, George Mehaffy

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

The role of the natural resources professional continues to expand into the world of communications, politics, and civic responsibility. How do we prepare our students to engage with that world as leaders? Using human dimensions issues associated with the American Democracy Project in the classroom to build civic engagement and communication skills in our future natural resource professionals is one approach. This presentation provides the opportunity for the audience to learn how to use particular strong issue sites (in this case the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem) as a way to help students learn how to identify issues, explore public sentiment, plan ...


The Wakenature Preserves Partnership As An Example Of Community Engagement, George Hess, Gary Blank, Patti Clayton, Kaytee Holcombe, Chris Snow 2010 Utah State University

The Wakenature Preserves Partnership As An Example Of Community Engagement, George Hess, Gary Blank, Patti Clayton, Kaytee Holcombe, Chris Snow

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

The WakeNature Preserves Partnership (WakeNature) arose through a combination of citizen activism, recognition among government and other agencies of the need to appropriately manage ecologically valuable natural areas, and faculty and student interest in conserving natural resources in suburban Wake County, NC. WakeNature comprises individuals from government, non‐profit, and academic organizations. Since its inception WakeNature has been committed to positioning all partners as co‐educators, co‐learners, and co‐generators of knowledge, and has served as a platform for teaching, research, and engagement. During its two‐plus year history, WakeNature members have organized several service‐learning workdays at the ...


Distance Learning And Diversity, Pat Stephens Williams, Tamberly Conway 2010 Stephen F Austin State University

Distance Learning And Diversity, Pat Stephens Williams, Tamberly Conway

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Submitted as part of the Natural Resource Distance Learning Consortium (NRDLC)panel arranged by Kieran Lindsey. Distance learning is quickly becoming the educational opportunity of the future for those students who may not or would not be able to participate in a traditional college education. In addition, for universities to remain current, viable, and competitive, we must embrace at least some form of distance education. In a field where we are carefully watching consolidation of our colleges and departments and the bottom line of recruitment and retention, distance learning may provide us with a way to increase student numbers and ...


Wildlife Education: Changing In The Wind, Mark C. Wallace 2010 Texas Tech University

Wildlife Education: Changing In The Wind, Mark C. Wallace

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

In December 2007 The Wildlife Society (TWS) Ad Hoc Committee on Collegiate Programs was established and charged with assessing current wildlife programs in North America, their change over time, theory vs. practice and the role of hands‐on training, the importance of TWS certification, and what the ‘ideal’ wildlife program should look like. This task was driven by concerns over wildlife programs, the type of education that students are receiving, the quality and experience of students entering the job market, university enrollments, and the role of TWS certification. I present some of the results from our Ad Hoc Committee including ...


Congress In The Classroom, Janaki Alavalapati, J G. Collomb 2010 Viriginia Tech

Congress In The Classroom, Janaki Alavalapati, J G. Collomb

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Policies play central role in natural resource conservation and management. It is imperative for students to gain an in‐depth understanding and hands‐on experience of policy development. However, unlike field or lab oriented classes, it is somewhat challenging for educators to provide this experience for students in classrooms. Several structural (multiple goals, diverse stakeholders, and multiple disciplines), spatial (local, state, and national), and temporal (months, years, and decades) features of policy development would make it even more challenging. Here we share our experience of a technique, Congress in the Classroom, which was tried in Natural Resource Policy and Administration ...


How To Make E Learning Courses In Curricula Of Natural Resources Management More Sustainable?, Siegfried E. Lewark 2010 University of Freiburg

How To Make E Learning Courses In Curricula Of Natural Resources Management More Sustainable?, Siegfried E. Lewark

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

"The Internet may be the means of realizing a forestry lecturer’s dream. Imagine being able to discuss, for example, different timber harvesting systems used internationally with a group of motivated students from different regions of the globe in one virtual classroom." (Längin, Ackerman & Lewark, 2004). The huge potential of e‐learning has not yet been fully recognized let alone realized in higher education. Over the last ten to fifteen years many e‐learning courses in the fields of natural resources management, forestry and wood sciences emerged, have been used – and often disappeared again. Much effort and money has ...


Wildlife Management Education Needs To Go Urban, Clark E. Adams, Kieran J. Lindsey 2010 Texas A&M University

Wildlife Management Education Needs To Go Urban, Clark E. Adams, Kieran J. Lindsey

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

One of the common problems associated with introducing urban wildlife management (UWM) as part of the curriculum in the wildlife sciences has been the simplistic notions our colleagues, students, and others have regarding its conceptual framework. For example, the “raccoon in a garbage can” always seems to become the summative explanation of urban wildlife management. Other reductionist definitions include animal damage control, or that UWM is a particular suite of techniques peculiar only to urban areas. The latter problem is of our own making given the inclusion of UWM in the Wildlife Management Techniques Manual published by The Wildlife Society ...


Saf Specialized Accreditation For Urban Forestry Programs: A Case Study At Virginia Tech, Eric Wiseman, Susan Day 2010 Viriginia Tech

Saf Specialized Accreditation For Urban Forestry Programs: A Case Study At Virginia Tech, Eric Wiseman, Susan Day

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Recognizing the growth of the urban forestry profession and realizing that the accreditation standards for general forestry education were an inadequate measure of urban forestry curricula, the SAF Council charged its Educational Policy Review Committee in 2005 to develop specialized urban forestry accreditation standards. The review committee, augmented by additional members with urban forestry expertise, presented its accreditation recommendations to the SAF Council in December 2006. Following public review, the SAF Council approved the Standards for Specialized Accreditation of Educational Programs in Urban Forestry in June 2007 and incorporated the standards into the SAF Accreditation Handbook in August 2007. SAF ...


Transforming Face ­To ­Face Activities Into Distance Learning Activities: Increasing Student Engagement, Janell L. Moretz, Michelle G. Harrolle 2010 North Carolina State University

Transforming Face ­To ­Face Activities Into Distance Learning Activities: Increasing Student Engagement, Janell L. Moretz, Michelle G. Harrolle

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

As universities look to innovative ideas during these lean economic times, more departments are offering distance learning courses as an attempt to bridge the gap in their budgetary shortfalls, through generating additional funding and increasing class sizes (Foster & Carnevale, 2007). Unfortunately many times, faculty simply transform a face‐to‐face course into a distance education (DE) course without truly understanding the need to change the pedagogy necessary for a successful DE course (Carnevale, 2000; Xenos, Avouris, Stavrinoudis, & Margaritis, 2009). The purpose of our presentation is to explore the value of distance education and to present the challenges involved with transforming face‐to‐face courses and activities for DE courses. Transforming a face‐to‐face class into a distance learning class is relatively simple for course content; however, making the distance learning class as interactive as the face‐to‐face class is more challenging. There are obstacles inherent to distance learning as it pertains to group activities, student input, class activities, and sense of community among students; however these obstacles can be eliminated with the use of creative solutions and through the use of technological innovations ...


Cooperative Learning In Natural Resources Education, Rich Etchberger 2010 Utah State University

Cooperative Learning In Natural Resources Education, Rich Etchberger

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

I will present my use of cooperative learning techniques in a general education course at Utah State University (USU). I developed an undergraduate, junior‐level course called BIOL 3000 ‐ Biodiversity of Utah that is part of the general education requirements at Utah State University. From the beginning, a major challenge surfaced for this course in that the enrollment includes students who are science and also students who are non‐science majors. Science majors are biology and wildlife science majors. Non‐science majors are typically from outside the agricultural and natural resource fields. Non‐science students were underprepared for the course ...


Challenges To Professional Accreditation Of Forestry Degree Programs With Low Enrollments: The Utah State University Experience, Terry L. Sharik, Dustin H. Ranglack 2010 Utah State University

Challenges To Professional Accreditation Of Forestry Degree Programs With Low Enrollments: The Utah State University Experience, Terry L. Sharik, Dustin H. Ranglack

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

As a result of its setting in the semi‐arid Intermountain West where forests are confined largely to montane environments, Utah State University (USU) has historically had relatively low undergraduate enrollments in forestry compared to other natural resource disciplines and compared to other institutions in the U.S. also offering a broad range of natural resource degrees. As a result of this history, coupled to the national trend over the past two decades of proportionally lower enrollments in forestry compared to other natural resource disciplines, undergraduate enrollment in forestry at USU currently constitutes less than 4% of total enrollments in ...


Distance Education In Natural Resources: A National Study Of Inhibitors And Motivators For Participation In Distance Education Programs, Jodi B. Roberts, Steven Grado, Andrew Londo 2010 Mississippi State University

Distance Education In Natural Resources: A National Study Of Inhibitors And Motivators For Participation In Distance Education Programs, Jodi B. Roberts, Steven Grado, Andrew Londo

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Distance education is an aphorism that is gaining a great deal of attention on university campuses across the United States as well as worldwide. Despite this attention, the earliest record of distance education traces back to Biblical times, and was later referred to as correspondence. Land‐grant institutions were among the first to offer correspondence courses to students who may otherwise not be able to attend traditional university classes. While distance education programs and courses across the United States have grown, from 1.6 million students enrolled to 3.94 million students in two years, with only 4.5% of ...


Standing Our Ground: The Meaning Of Saf Accreditation, Laura E. DeWald, Terrance W. Clark 2010 Western Carolina University

Standing Our Ground: The Meaning Of Saf Accreditation, Laura E. Dewald, Terrance W. Clark

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

Since its inception in 1935, the SAF accreditation program for forestry education has changed significantly. Initially, accreditation was a rating system of one’s alma mater to determine which graduates had the knowledge to be eligible for SAF membership versus those who needed more on‐ the‐job experience to qualify. Thus from the beginning, the focus of accreditation has been on quality of education. However, what constitutes “forestry education” has always been difficult for SAF to define for accreditation purposes. For example, a July 1935 Journal of Forestry article described “recreational forestry” as a branch of forestry or a separate ...


What Should An Introduction To Natural Resources Course Do?, Gary B. Blank 2010 North Carolina State University

What Should An Introduction To Natural Resources Course Do?, Gary B. Blank

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

I would like to conduct a facilitated forum, with participation from various NR programs to address the question of the title. The premise is that first year and transfer students entering natural resources curricula do so because they are hands‐on learners, are attracted to activities occurring in the outdoors, and have limited patience with typical lecture formats for learning. The issue is how we engage and retain NR students so they prosper in our programs. In this forum, I would like to pose a variety of scenarios and elicit responses from participants concerning their experiences about varied formats for ...


Phi Alpha Theta (History Honorary) Welcome, John M. Dunn 2010 Western Michigan University

Phi Alpha Theta (History Honorary) Welcome, John M. Dunn

WMU President John Dunn

No abstract provided.


Attracting Students To Forestry: The Lugar ­Purdue Future Of Forestry Programs And Awards, Ralph R. Johnson, Robert K. Swihart 2010 Purdue University

Attracting Students To Forestry: The Lugar ­Purdue Future Of Forestry Programs And Awards, Ralph R. Johnson, Robert K. Swihart

Conference on University Education in Natural Resources

In an effort to attract more students to the forest sciences, Purdue University and U.S. Senator Richard Lugar have initiated a program designed to introduce students to the forest sciences. Although the primary audience of the program is high school students, the curriculum is being designed for delivery as an optional for‐credit class targeting non‐forestry majors and as a course to enhance two‐year community college agriculture curricula. The program consists of two parts. The first part of the program is an online academic core that consists of 7 modules. Faculty in the Department of Forestry and ...


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