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Instructor Humor As A Tool To Increase Student Engagement, Carl Christman 2018 California State University – San Bernardino

Instructor Humor As A Tool To Increase Student Engagement, Carl Christman

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

As various stakeholders examine the value and quality of higher education, a greater emphasis is being put on educational outcomes. There is constant focus on improving the quality of undergraduate education and one of the keys to this is understanding what makes a good instructor. Effective instructors rely on a variety of tools and techniques to engage their students and help them learn. One common tool that instructors in higher education rely on in the classroom is humor.

The primary research question this study is attempting to answer is: In what ways, if any, does humor infused instruction promote high ...


Study Of Physical Layer Security And Teaching Methods In Wireless Communications, Zhijian Xie, Christopher Horne 2018 NC A&T State Unversity

Study Of Physical Layer Security And Teaching Methods In Wireless Communications, Zhijian Xie, Christopher Horne

KSU Proceedings on Cybersecurity Education, Research and Practice

In most wireless channels, the signals propagate in all directions. For the communication between Alice and Bob, an Eavesdropper can receive the signals from both Alice and Bob as far as the Eavesdropper is in the range determined by the transmitting power. Through phased array antenna with beam tracking circuits or cooperative iteration, the signals are confined near the straight line connecting the positions of Alice and Bob, so it will largely reduce the valid placement of an Eavesdropper. Sometimes, this reduction can be prohibitive for Eavesdropper to wiretap the channel since the reduced space can be readily protected. Two ...


The Pedagogical Practices Of Clinical Nurse Educators - Les Pratiques Pédagogiques Des Infirmières Formatrices Cliniques, Anita Jennings, Clare Brett 2018 George Brown College of Applied Arts and Technology

The Pedagogical Practices Of Clinical Nurse Educators - Les Pratiques Pédagogiques Des Infirmières Formatrices Cliniques, Anita Jennings, Clare Brett

Quality Advancement in Nursing Education - Avancées en formation infirmière

Clinical practice are an important component of undergraduate nursing education and involve clinical nurse educators who are primarily responsible for teaching student nurses in that context. Twelve nurse educators who taught in the clinical arena participated in this grounded theory study. These participants taught in a number of undergraduate nursing programs in a large metropolitan city in Ontario, Canada. The results revealed several insights and in this article the authors focus on one in particular: the various intersecting forms of knowledge that nurse educator participants brought to their teaching practice. The results from this study provide a more detailed understanding ...


On The Nature Of The University And What It Means For Nursing Education - La Nature De L’Université Et Ses Implications Pour La Formation En Sciences Infirmières, Jacinthe I. Pepin, Florence Myrick 2018 Université de Montréal

On The Nature Of The University And What It Means For Nursing Education - La Nature De L’Université Et Ses Implications Pour La Formation En Sciences Infirmières, Jacinthe I. Pepin, Florence Myrick

Quality Advancement in Nursing Education - Avancées en formation infirmière

No abstract provided.


Student And Faculty Perceptions Of Live Synchronous Distance Education For Allied Health Students Following Program Expansion To A Rural Campus, Betsy J. Becker, Kelsey Rutt, Allyson Huntley, Harlan Sayles, Kim Michael 2018 University of Nebraska Medical Center

Student And Faculty Perceptions Of Live Synchronous Distance Education For Allied Health Students Following Program Expansion To A Rural Campus, Betsy J. Becker, Kelsey Rutt, Allyson Huntley, Harlan Sayles, Kim Michael

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Background & Purpose: Distance education (DE) is a means to meet allied health workforce needs in rural locations where healthcare worker shortages are apparent. Five allied health programs were expanded to a rural campus teaching synchronously using distance education technology. The purpose of this convergent parallel mixed methods study was to explore perceptions of allied health students and faculty at two campus locations.

Methods: Quantitative and qualitative information were collected through a survey of students and faculty (physical therapy, physician assistant, and medical imaging [diagnostic medical sonography, radiography, magnetic resonance imaging] programs). Both campuses served as live and distance sites depending on instructor location and area of content expertise. For example, morning courses may be taught live from one campus, and afternoon classes taught live from the other campus. Only one program, physical therapy, offered labs by distance education. Response distributions were compared for questions by campus using Cochran-Armitage trend tests and analyzed de-identified qualitative comments using constant comparisons to establish themes.

Results: Student (n=121) and faculty (n=19) mostly agreed distance education technology was effective for teaching and learning. Significant differences were found in student opinions about receiving a similar educational experience between the two campuses. More students at the Main campus somewhat or strongly disagreed (n=34, 37%) it was similar compared to the Rural campus (n= 5, 17%, p=0.024). There were no comments specifically related to the physical therapy lab experience. Open-ended comment themes included training, purposeful engagement of both campus locations, and setting clear expectations.

Conclusions: Although differences in learning experiences exist between the main and rural campus locations; the results indicated using distance education technology is an effective means to deliver the curriculum. Both students and faculty commented about the lack of experience with the educational technology before implementation. Synchronous, distance education offers the opportunity for program expansion and effective delivery of curriculum content. Using the results of this study can enhance future education in allied health professions using synchronous distance education technology.


Utilization Of Information Technology As Instructional Support In Higher Education – A Case Study, Linda C. Gordon, Erin Gratz, David Kung, Leeshawn Moore, Shelley G. Urbizagastegui 2018 University of La Verne

Utilization Of Information Technology As Instructional Support In Higher Education – A Case Study, Linda C. Gordon, Erin Gratz, David Kung, Leeshawn Moore, Shelley G. Urbizagastegui

Communications of the IIMA

Despite significant increases in the growth of online education, a review of research reveals few studies of faculty perceptions of the use of technology in classrooms in higher education. Research can explore and illuminate how to bridge the gap between faculty perceptions and institutional goals and objectives for online programs. The study at hand presents the views of full-time and adjunct faculty across the colleges, both on- and off-campus, and the online community, at the University of La Verne, a private Tier II doctoral degree-granting institution located in Southern California.


Assessment Of Modeling Skills, Robert L. Mayes Dr. 2018 Georgia Southern University

Assessment Of Modeling Skills, Robert L. Mayes Dr.

Annual Symposium on Biomathematics and Ecology: Education and Research

No abstract provided.


Non-Traditional Students At Public Regional Universities: A Case Study, Lizabeth Zack 2018 University of South Carolina Upstate

Non-Traditional Students At Public Regional Universities: A Case Study, Lizabeth Zack

Teacher-Scholar: The Journal of the State Comprehensive University

This paper investigates the topic of non-traditional students enrolled at four-year public regional universities and addresses questions about who they are, what makes them non-traditional and how they experience college life. The analysis is based on survey data collected from 187 undergraduates at one regional public college in the southeastern United States. The study found a higher portion of non-traditional students than expected and that the non-traditional students tended to break down into two types, a younger worker-student and an older adult student, rather than conforming to a single profile. While the findings highlight other similarities with the broader population ...


The Role Of Support Systems For Success Of Underrepresented Students In Communication Sciences And Disorders, Akiko Fuse, Michael Bergen 2018 Brooklyn College/The City University of New York

The Role Of Support Systems For Success Of Underrepresented Students In Communication Sciences And Disorders, Akiko Fuse, Michael Bergen

Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders

There is limited representation in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) professions of individuals from diverse populations. This study examined the relationship among CSD students' degree of financial, emotional/moral, and academic support. The relationship between role models and admissions outcomes was also assessed. It explored how support received by CSD students differs by racial/ethnic backgrounds. A survey was completed by 57 alumni of an undergraduate CSD program, revealing information about participants’ backgrounds, support characteristics, and other factors. The study 1) highlighted the importance of emotional/moral and financial support, 2) revealed reduced access to financial and academic role models ...


Unprepared: A Qualitative Exploration Of The Preparation Practices Of Slps Practicing In Urban Schools, Audrey M. Farrugia-Bernard 2018 Eastern Michigan University

Unprepared: A Qualitative Exploration Of The Preparation Practices Of Slps Practicing In Urban Schools, Audrey M. Farrugia-Bernard

Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders

The field of speech-language pathology severely lacks diversity, yet speech language pathologists serve an increasingly diverse population in schools. This qualitative study explored the academic preparation practices of speech-language pathologists working in urban schools. The findings revealed that the participants felt they were not adequately prepared to work in urban schools with children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds independent of the model of multicultural education that they received in their graduate education. Results suggest that we need to connect multicultural coursework to local, urban communities in order to better prepare speech-language pathologists to work in urban schools.


An Exploratory Study Of Speech-Language Pathologists' Perceptions Of Multicultural Counseling In Communication Sciences And Disorders, Crystal C. Randolph, Janet L. Bradshaw 2018 Valdosta State University

An Exploratory Study Of Speech-Language Pathologists' Perceptions Of Multicultural Counseling In Communication Sciences And Disorders, Crystal C. Randolph, Janet L. Bradshaw

Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders

Speech-language pathologists’ (SLPs) perceptions of multicultural counseling vary according to their academic (teaching and learning), educational, supervisory, supervisee, and clinical experiences. With the increase of culturally and linguistically diverse populations, the implementation of multicultural counseling in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) is essential to providing efficacious assessments and interventions. The current research reports data from a recent survey that queried SLPs’ perceptions of multicultural counseling in CSD. Results from the survey reveal that SLPs' perceptions of MC vary according to their experiences (e.g., educational, supervisory, clinical).


Sacred Heart University Scholar, Volume 2, Number 1, 2018 Sacred Heart University

Sacred Heart University Scholar, Volume 2, Number 1

Sacred Heart University Scholar

No abstract provided.


A Word From The Writing Team (October 2018), Jennifer Wilson, MS, ELS, Pam Walter, MFA 2018 Thomas Jefferson University

A Word From The Writing Team (October 2018), Jennifer Wilson, Ms, Els, Pam Walter, Mfa

A Word From the Writing Team (Newsletter)

This issue includes:

  • Writing Lessons from Ted-Ed
  • WHYY's Maiken Scott on Communicating Science
  • Paywall: The Business of Scholarship


Practical, Epistemological, And Ethical Challenges Of Participatory Action Research: A Cross-Disciplinary Review Of The Literature, Danielle L. Lake, Joel Wendland 2018 Grand Valley State University

Practical, Epistemological, And Ethical Challenges Of Participatory Action Research: A Cross-Disciplinary Review Of The Literature, Danielle L. Lake, Joel Wendland

Danielle L Lake

This article extends recent discussions on the practical, epistemological, and ethical challenges of participatory action research (PAR) for community engaged scholars through a cross-disciplinary literature review. It focuses on how practitioners across fields define power, engage with conventional research approval processes, and manage risk. The review demonstrates that PAR can be a valuable research approach for community engaged scholars, but that problematic practices and disparities must be addressed. For instance, while PAR practitioners consistently articulate a commitment to empowering the community and shifting structures of oppression, contradictions around how to define and respond to power, engage with standard IRB practices ...


Book Review: Overcoming Student Learning Bottlenecks: Decode The Critical Thinking Of Your Discipline, Emily Ballantyne 2018 Mount Saint Vincent University

Book Review: Overcoming Student Learning Bottlenecks: Decode The Critical Thinking Of Your Discipline, Emily Ballantyne

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

No abstract provided.


Performance, Preference, And Perception In Experiential Learning Assessment, Jay R. Wilson, Thomas T. Yates, Kendra Purton 2018 University of Saskatchewan

Performance, Preference, And Perception In Experiential Learning Assessment, Jay R. Wilson, Thomas T. Yates, Kendra Purton

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

A pilot study was conducted to explore student preferences, performance, and perceptions of experiential learning assessment following experiential learning instruction. A learning experience, using semi-directed instruction and experiential learning methods, was given to 13 student volunteers who were then assessed using a case study, presentation, journal, and essay, representing both group and individual assessment. Student performance in terms of their understanding and their engagement was compared to student perceptions and preferences. Student performance indicated that although the journal (individual assessment) appeared to be the best venue for students to express their understanding, they were the least engaged in it. The ...


A Common Book: A Novel Approach To Teaching And Learning, Kristen A. Ferguson, Natalya Brown, Linda Piper 2018 Nipissing University

A Common Book: A Novel Approach To Teaching And Learning, Kristen A. Ferguson, Natalya Brown, Linda Piper

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Most research on common book programs focuses on student outcomes. This paper presents a study about the impact of a common book program on teaching and learning practices at a small mainly undergraduate university. This study consists of two phases. In Phase 1, we surveyed faculty members (N= 32, a response rate of 21.3%), about the influence of the program on teaching practices and dialogue with colleagues as well as their perceptions of the program’s impact on student learning. In Phase 2, we conducted interviews with business faculty, who were early program adopters (N=8). Most respondents believed ...


Sharing Narratives To Foster Mental Health Literacy In Teacher Candidates, Vera Woloshyn, Michael J. Savage 2018 Brock University

Sharing Narratives To Foster Mental Health Literacy In Teacher Candidates, Vera Woloshyn, Michael J. Savage

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

This study explored the nature of teacher candidates’ mental health narratives in the context of completing an elective course in mental health and wellness. How students deconstructed their narratives and the narratives of their peers over time was also explored. Participants included 67 fourth-year students completing a five-year concurrent teacher education program. Data was collected over two academic years and consisted of students’ beginning-of-course and end-of-course narratives. The narratives were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. The findings are discussed in the context of using shared narratives as case study to promote self-reflection, discussion, problem-solving and mental health literacy within ...


Investigating The Relationship Between Residence Learning Community Participation And Student Academic Outcomes In A Canadian Institution, Justine O. Hobbins, Mildred Eisenbach, Kerry L. Ritchie, Shoshanah Jacobs 2018 University of Guelph

Investigating The Relationship Between Residence Learning Community Participation And Student Academic Outcomes In A Canadian Institution, Justine O. Hobbins, Mildred Eisenbach, Kerry L. Ritchie, Shoshanah Jacobs

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

This study investigated the relationship between residential living scenario and first year grades, second year retention, and 5-year graduation rates of students at a Canadian comprehensive university. We compared the academic outcomes of students living in residence learning communities (RLCs) to those in other living scenarios (traditional residences and off-campus). RLCs have been shown to be positively associated with student academic outcomes in the United States; however, the data to support RLCs in Canada is non-existent. A longitudinal observational study was conducted to analyse the academic outcomes of a complete cohort of students (n=4805) who lived in RLCs (18 ...


Audio Feedback: Student And Teaching Assistant Perspectives On An Alternative Mode Of Feedback For Written Assignments, Fiona Rawle, Mindy Thuna, Ting Zhao, Michael Kaler 2018 University of Toronto Mississauga

Audio Feedback: Student And Teaching Assistant Perspectives On An Alternative Mode Of Feedback For Written Assignments, Fiona Rawle, Mindy Thuna, Ting Zhao, Michael Kaler

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Competence in written scientific communication is an important learning outcome of undergraduate science degrees. Writing helps students learn, encourages them to think creatively and critically about their learning, and trains them in communicating their insights as disciplinary experts. However, challenges exist in incorporating writing assignments into large undergraduate science classes, including lack of student engagement and difficulty in providing effective and personalized formative feedback to large numbers of students. Engagement and feedback are especially important for developing writing skills, which require active, reflective, critical attention on the learner’s part: it would be very useful if one mechanism could enhance ...


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