Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Higher Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

77,237 Full-Text Articles 29,053 Authors 4,609,518 Downloads 347 Institutions

All Articles in Higher Education

Faceted Search

77,237 full-text articles. Page 1820 of 1842.

Hard Science And Soft Interpersonal Skills, L. Mills, James McDowelle, William Rouse Jr. 2010 Fort Hays State University

Hard Science And Soft Interpersonal Skills, L. Mills, James Mcdowelle, William Rouse Jr.

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Carl Carter is a professional photographer who once worked as a grip in movies filmed in New York City. The job of the grip is to install the tracks upon which cameras are mounted and also performs other manual labor as needed on a movie set. Carl was hired many times by both Woody Allen and Sidney Lumet, directors and movie makers who filmed most of their movies in New York City. Allen and Lumet made movies that were very different. Allen is famous for light, romantic comedies, such as Annie Hall, Bullets over Broadway and Everybody says I Love ...


Higher Education Consortium Leads To College Students Taking A Fresh Look At Continuing Challenges For Their Region, Joseph Fink III 2010 Fort Hays State University

Higher Education Consortium Leads To College Students Taking A Fresh Look At Continuing Challenges For Their Region, Joseph Fink Iii

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Institutions of higher education have long had teaching, research and service as their primary missions. Emphasis among those three areas of activity can vary substantially from one institution to another. For example, a land grant university may have a greater emphasis on service or outreach to the communities it serves than would, say, a traditional liberal arts college. Society appears to have an increased expectation that the research conducted at research universities will lead to economic development opportunities (Yusuf & Fink, 2007). Fortunately, each type of institution has much to offer society at large and the communities or regions where located ...


Home Learning Activities: A Feasible Practice For Increasing Parental Involvement, Heather Bower, Joelle Powers, Laurie Graham 2010 Fort Hays State University

Home Learning Activities: A Feasible Practice For Increasing Parental Involvement, Heather Bower, Joelle Powers, Laurie Graham

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Research has substantiated the importance of increased parental involvement in schools for improving student academic outcomes. Parental involvement in education has been found to be positively associated with child academic success across multiple populations and age groups (Gutman & McLoyd, 2000; Lareau, 2000; López, Scribner & Mahitivanichcha, 2001; Steinburg, Lamborn, Dornbusch, & Darling, 1992). Results suggest that when parents are actively involved in their child’s education, long lasting academic, social, and emotional benefits occur (Chavkin, 2006). For example, Hill and Craft (2003) found that increased parental involvement leads to early social competence, which predicts academic success. Similarly, parental involvement in school also increases opportunities for families to access additional support and resources that may be necessary to achieve school success for some students (Hill & Taylor, 2004; Lee & Bowen, 2006). Furthermore, increased parental involvement has been identified as an effective strategy for reducing the achievement gap (Zellman & Waterman, 1998). Chavkin (2006) sums up these findings well when she states, “When parents are involved in their children’s learning, children do better in school and in life” (p. 629).


Impact Of The Media On The Senior Secondary School Students Performance In Speech Work In English Language, G.O. Oyinloye, I.O. Adeleye 2010 Fort Hays State University

Impact Of The Media On The Senior Secondary School Students Performance In Speech Work In English Language, G.O. Oyinloye, I.O. Adeleye

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Most Nigerian students learn English Language as a second Language (L2).They have acquired their mother tongues (L1) and are very proficient in them before entering the school. In most cases, many secondary school students do not have the opportunity to use English language at home. For such students, English Language learning and use is restricted to the classroom. Therefore, these students use their mother tongue more in the school environment, at home and for interpersonal relationships. These practices are negatively affecting the production of some sounds in English Language, which is the language of education, government, commerce and international ...


Impact Of Total Quality Control Measures On Secondary School Students’ Academic Performance In Ogun State, A. Adenaike, O.S. Olaniyi 2010 Fort Hays State University

Impact Of Total Quality Control Measures On Secondary School Students’ Academic Performance In Ogun State, A. Adenaike, O.S. Olaniyi

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

The pride of educational system depends not just on the quantity but more importantly, on the quality of its products at all levels. The quality of the products in turn depends largely on the quality of the education diet that students receive in Secondary Schools and which is also dependent upon the standard of control that teachers and students enjoy. It has been observed that, the problem of adequate and effective quality control has been responsible for producing students who remain half-baked and could not assist the society in which they find themselves (Erinle & Abioye, 2003). The problem of quality ...


Impact Of Variations In Distributed Leadership Frameworks On Implementing A Professional Development Initiative, Jeffrey Pedersen, Stuart Yager, Robert Yager 2010 Fort Hays State University

Impact Of Variations In Distributed Leadership Frameworks On Implementing A Professional Development Initiative, Jeffrey Pedersen, Stuart Yager, Robert Yager

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Educators, principals, and teachers alike, are being challenged with higher demands and requirements in preparing our future generations for the 21st century. Professional development for teachers is a key focus in school transformation efforts. School transformation in today’s educational system is dependent, in part, by how well teachers work together with their principal and colleagues (Louis, Leithwood, Wahlstrom, & Anderson, 2010). Recent research has focused on the role of the school principal and other site-based leaders in the implementation of professional development initiatives (Pedersen, Yager, & Yager, 2010). Principals play a key role in supporting and encouraging teachers’ professional development needs ...


Implications Of Collaboration In Education, Stephanie Laymon Med 2010 Fort Hays State University

Implications Of Collaboration In Education, Stephanie Laymon Med

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

There are many examples of collaboration in education. Superintendents must collaborate with department heads, principals, teacher associations, and state agencies. Principals must collaborate with teachers, parents, student organizations, and local agencies. Teacher educators must collaborate within the University as well as with local education agencies and pre-service teachers. Special educators must collaborate with parents, agencies, regular education teachers, school psychologists, etc. While these examples in no way encompass the myriad forms of collaboration necessary in education, they bring clarity to the fact that no level of education is immune to collaboration.


Implicit Models Of School Improvement: A Mixed Method Analysis, Robert Griffore, Lillian Phenice, John Schweitzer, Robert Green 2010 Fort Hays State University

Implicit Models Of School Improvement: A Mixed Method Analysis, Robert Griffore, Lillian Phenice, John Schweitzer, Robert Green

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

There is a persistent belief that public schools are profoundly in need of improvement (Berliner & Biddle, 1995). Given substantial research on teaching literature (Borman, Hewes, Overman, & Brown, 2003; Hertling, 2000), it is not clear why more progress has not been made. Perhaps an answer may be found in the complexity of the educational literature, which provides a confused map toward accomplishing school improvement. Educational leaders are left in the position of relying on either imprecisely formulated or idiosyncratic and implicit models of school improvement without clear guidelines to follow for specific contexts. Models appear as ex post facto, reflecting an approach to educational reform on the part of administrators that may be best ...


Influence And Relationship Of Birth Order And Secondary School Students’ Academic Achievement, A. Ositoye, Muyiwa Adeyemi, Ade Onabarniro 2010 Fort Hays State University

Influence And Relationship Of Birth Order And Secondary School Students’ Academic Achievement, A. Ositoye, Muyiwa Adeyemi, Ade Onabarniro

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Academic achievement or the level of academic success is the main concern of all stakeholders of education. High achievement has, however, become a great task before the students but it is sad to observe that poor academic achievement were recorded both at the secondary and tertiary levels of education in Nigeria (Tenibiaje, 2009).


Influence Of Resources Allocation In Education On Secondary School Students’ Outcome In Nigeria., Olabanji Obadara, Abayomi Alaka 2010 Fort Hays State University

Influence Of Resources Allocation In Education On Secondary School Students’ Outcome In Nigeria., Olabanji Obadara, Abayomi Alaka

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

School finance is concerned with the mobilization and allocation of resources to schools. School finance issues are of paramount concern to all levels of educational system both at federal, state, and local government level. The child’s future as well as the future of a society in general, depends largely on the quality of the educational system. The high expectation of the society for students and teachers to perform at higher levels, and for schools to guarantee the success of all students, the question of how best to support the expectation through effective and efficient allocation resources becomes even more ...


Job Satisfaction And Motivation: Understanding Its Impact On Employee Commitment And Organisational Performance, Kwasi Dartey-Baah, Agatha Harlley 2010 Fort Hays State University

Job Satisfaction And Motivation: Understanding Its Impact On Employee Commitment And Organisational Performance, Kwasi Dartey-Baah, Agatha Harlley

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

Organisations have been described as a social arrangement for the controlled performance of collective goals (Stewart, 1973). They exist basically for two reasons: to maximise profit or share holder value, (Huczynski and Buchanan, 1991). Latest trends in management encourage the integration of the needs of employees with that of organisations. Maximising profit through growth/expansion and increased share value should not be the only motivation for organisations. Investment in people should be at the fore of business strategy and in developing human resources which invariably benefits the respective organisations. The role and effective use and management of human resources in ...


Leadership For Higher Education – Role Of A Dean, A. Singh, Bharathi Purohit 2010 Fort Hays State University

Leadership For Higher Education – Role Of A Dean, A. Singh, Bharathi Purohit

Academic Leadership: The Online Journal

The role of the academic dean is often a difficult one to describe. As a leader in higher education the dean has various responsibilities and many challenges to face that tend to evolve with the ever-changing face of higher education. The role of the academic dean is one that is multifaceted, challenging and often ambiguous. (Walker, 2000) The dean is a person the students could go to in times of trouble and in times of prosper, and to learn from the dean about life. It is essential that deans have the required knowledge base, skills and abilities to perform effectively ...


“21st Century Makeover”, Jonathan Jeffrey 2010 Western Kentucky University

“21st Century Makeover”, Jonathan Jeffrey

DLSC Faculty and Staff Publications

Van Meter Hall was the first building constructed atop College Hill for the fledgling Western Kentucky University. Designed by Louisville architect Brinton B. Davis, the imposing structure was dedicated on May 5, 1911 after numerous delays. The building contained the university’s administrative offices as well as a large auditorium suitable for chapel services and a public space for speakers and other performance events. One hundred years later, the building was renovated, providing the campus with an outstanding public events venue.


Alyssa Cheadle, Sara Friedl-Putnam 2010 Augustana College

Alyssa Cheadle, Sara Friedl-Putnam

Intersections

No abstract provided.


From The Publisher, Mark Wilhelm 2010 Augustana College

From The Publisher, Mark Wilhelm

Intersections

No abstract provided.


Rollins Magazine, Spring 2010, Rollins College Office of Marketing and Communications 2010 Rollins College

Rollins Magazine, Spring 2010, Rollins College Office Of Marketing And Communications

Rollins Magazine

Issue Title: "Generation Next"


Traumatic Brain Injury: Transition And Intervention, Susan C. Davies 2010 University of Dayton

Traumatic Brain Injury: Transition And Intervention, Susan C. Davies

Counselor Education and Human Services Faculty Publications

The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act defines traumatic brain injury as an acquired in· jury to the brain caused by an external physical force. The injury results in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment, or both, that adversely affects a child's educational performance. The term applies to open or closed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas, such as cognition; langnage; memory; attention; reasoning; abstract thinking; judgment; problem-solving; sensory, perceptual, and motor abilities; psychosocial behavior; physical functions; information processing; and speech. The term does not apply to brain injuries that are congenital or ...


What Motivates Students To Study Abroad?, Jennifer Massey, Jeff Burrow, John Dixon 2010 Queen's University - Kingston, Ontario

What Motivates Students To Study Abroad?, Jennifer Massey, Jeff Burrow, John Dixon

Jennifer Massey

No abstract provided.


Full Issue, Number 31, Winter 2010, 2010 Augustana College

Full Issue, Number 31, Winter 2010

Intersections

No abstract provided.


Defining And Achieving Success: Perspectives From Students At Catholic Women’S Colleges, Kathryn A. E. Enke, Rebecca Ropers-Huilman 2010 College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University

Defining And Achieving Success: Perspectives From Students At Catholic Women’S Colleges, Kathryn A. E. Enke, Rebecca Ropers-Huilman

Administration Publications

This paper explores the concept of success, as defined through interviews with 26 senior students at two Catholic women’s colleges in the Midwestern United States. Participants described success in expansive ways, grouped into five themes: (a) success is subjective and internally defined, (b) success involves finding a balance between work and family, (c) success involves contributing to a community, (d) successful women are goal-oriented, and (e) successful women do not impede their own success. The findings suggest that if college leaders are to help develop "successful" women graduates, they must listen to how their students define success.


Digital Commons powered by bepress