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The Forest, The Trees, The Bark, The Pith: An Intensive Look At The Circulation Rates Of Primary Texts In Ten Major Literature Areas At The University Of Oregon Libraries, Jeff D. Staiger 2020 University of Oregon

The Forest, The Trees, The Bark, The Pith: An Intensive Look At The Circulation Rates Of Primary Texts In Ten Major Literature Areas At The University Of Oregon Libraries, Jeff D. Staiger

Charleston Library Conference

This poster looks at the circulation rate for literary primary texts, which constitute a unique area of collecting in academic libraries: while they do not in most cases meet immediate research needs, it is assumed that libraries ought to acquire them, for reasons including future research needs, preservation of the cultural record, and the ability of members of the intellectual community to stay current, those these remain primarily tacit. The circulation trends of contemporary literary works in ten areas of literature (English, American, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Latin American, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian) over the past twenty years at the ...


The Censors In The Years Of The Calm, Jackson Taylor Jr. 2020 University of Mississipi

The Censors In The Years Of The Calm, Jackson Taylor Jr.

Studies in English

No abstract provided.


Intertextuality, Aesthetics, And The Digital: Rediscovering Chekhov In Early British Modernism, Sam Jacob 2020 Brigham Young University

Intertextuality, Aesthetics, And The Digital: Rediscovering Chekhov In Early British Modernism, Sam Jacob

The Macksey Journal

Intertextuality between Anton Chekhov and early modernist writers such as Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Raymond Carver, and DH Lawrence is a recurrent topic in comparativist scholarship. However, due to the breadth of methodological approaches, conclusions regarding Chekhov’s influence continue to elude scholars. This article shifts the exploration of Chekhovian intertextuality in the early modernist period (circa 1900-1925) away from the rigid concept of influence alone. By applying current theory regarding postcritical hermeneutics, aesthetics, and digital textual analysis, I introduce new intertextual connections between Chekhov and modernist short stories, showing that transnational exchange within the short story genre need not ...


Review Of La Bella España: El Teatro De Lope De Vega En La Rusia Soviética Y Postsoviética By Veronika Ryjik, Slav N. Gratchev 2020 Marshall University

Review Of La Bella España: El Teatro De Lope De Vega En La Rusia Soviética Y Postsoviética By Veronika Ryjik, Slav N. Gratchev

Modern Languages Faculty Research

There are certain writers whose importance only grows with time, and the longer the distance that separates us from them, the more facets of their genius they demonstrate to us, the readers of the twenty-first century. One of these authors is Lope de Vega. The new book of Veronika Ryjik now makes another major contribution to the scholarship of a great master who was well known and admired in Soviet Russia. It is indeed a serious study and one that fermented in the mind of the scholar for more than ten years – the true symbol of a truly remarkable book ...


Through A Glass, Enviously: Yuri Olesha's Photographic Distortion Of Reality, Julia Curl 2020 The New School

Through A Glass, Enviously: Yuri Olesha's Photographic Distortion Of Reality, Julia Curl

2020 JHU Richard Macksey National Undergraduate Humanities Research Symposium

Yuri Olesha's 1927 novel Envy, the author's magnum opus and an often-overlooked tour de force of modern Russian Literature depicts the world through the eyes of an isolated loner named Nikolai Kavalerov. Kavalerov's vision of the world is distorted, surreal; he asserts that he is afflicted by thinking in images, a phrase which this paper traces back to the Russian Formalists debate as to whether or not art is thinking in images. This paper goes on to argue that Kavalerov's mode of seeing is not only avant-garde in its defamiliarization, it is inherently photographic: Through the ...


On Angels’ Wings: Idolatry In Viktoria Tokareva’S “Five Figures On A Pedestal” And Lyudmila Ulitskaya’S “Angel”, Courtney E. Bentz 2020 University of Montana, Missoula

On Angels’ Wings: Idolatry In Viktoria Tokareva’S “Five Figures On A Pedestal” And Lyudmila Ulitskaya’S “Angel”, Courtney E. Bentz

Undergraduate Theses, Professional Papers, and Capstone Artifacts

In his essays on Greek deities, Ralph Waldo Emerson declared: “Every man is a divinity in disguise, a god playing the fool.” While the idea of gods taking a corporeal form or angels walking among humans is a common literary trope, seldom do mortal characters find themselves compared to the divine without negative repercussions. Select post-Soviet women writers, however, flip this trope to explore the opposite. They instead embrace the human as holy, restrained by little consequence, as a means to highlight its destructive qualities in the context of an intimate relationship. These contemporary authors, Viktoria Tokareva and Lyudmila Ulitskaya ...


Russian Literature, Horace Peters Biddle 2020 Livre de Lyon

Russian Literature, Horace Peters Biddle

Philology

Literature is as enduring as human nature, and had its beginning almost coeval with the origin of mankind. The traditions, observations, and tales of love and battle, form the bases of the first rude essays of the historian, the philosopher, and the poet. Poetry precedes civilization—not, indeed, in the shape of regular poems, but in bold expression and striking metaphor; tradition is ever the precursor of authentic history, and observation is the only true basis of philosophy. The arts began early in the history of man.


Voice Of Silence: Women Inmates' Perspective On Sexual Violence In The Soviet Gulag, 1936-1956, Louisa Jane Fulkerson 2020 Bard College

Voice Of Silence: Women Inmates' Perspective On Sexual Violence In The Soviet Gulag, 1936-1956, Louisa Jane Fulkerson

Senior Projects Spring 2020

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College.


Shalamov's Testament: Pushkinian Precepts In Kolyma Tales, Andres I. Meraz 2020 Bard College

Shalamov's Testament: Pushkinian Precepts In Kolyma Tales, Andres I. Meraz

Senior Projects Spring 2020

In a letter from 1972, the author of Kolyma Tales and survivor of the gulag Varlam Shalamov, declared “In my prose, I consider myself the inheritor of the Pushkinian tradition <…>.” Indeed, in Kolyma Tales, Shalamov exhibited a studied understanding of Pushkin’s artistic technique. Through his implementation of Pushkinian artistic principles, Shalamov was seeking to restore the poet’s image to what it had been prior to the Soviet Union’s politicized interpretation while simultaneously revealing the truth about life in the labor camps to a readership that could not otherwise fathom what the inmates endured on day-to-day basis. In ...


Understanding The Cultural And Nationalistic Impacts Of The Moguchaya Kuchka, Austin M. Doub 2019 Cedarville University

Understanding The Cultural And Nationalistic Impacts Of The Moguchaya Kuchka, Austin M. Doub

Musical Offerings

This paper explores Russian culture beginning in the mid nineteenth-century as the leading group of composers and musicians known as the moguchaya kuchka, or The Mighty Five, sought to influence Russian culture and develop a "pure" school of Russian music amid rampant westernization. Comprised of César Cui, Alexander Borodin, Mily Balakirev, Modest Mussorgsky, and Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov, this group of inspired musicians opposed westernization and supported Official Nationalism by the incorporation of folklore, local village traditions, and promotion of their Tsar as a supreme political leader. In particular, the works of Balakirev, Cui, and Mussorgsky established cultural pride and contributed to ...


The Construction Of Morality In Crime And Punishment, Ethan Collins 2019 University of North Georgia

The Construction Of Morality In Crime And Punishment, Ethan Collins

Department of English Capstone Abstracts

Doestoevsky’s Crime and Punishment is a contemplation on Nihilism. The protagonist Raskolnikov gives five reasons for why he commits his famous double murder, but he later admits that all of these reasons are insincere. This paper is a reevaluation of Raskolnikov’s motive (or lack thereof) for killing Alyona and her sister. Many different readings of Raskolnikov use the entire book as evidence to decide which one of his excuses was his actual motivation. These readings of Raskolnikov have a category problem. With all of the false reasons that Raskolnikov gives, why should a reader believe that any of ...


Ivan And His Doubles: The Failure Of Intellect In The Brothers Karamazov, Alex Donley 2019 Liberty University

Ivan And His Doubles: The Failure Of Intellect In The Brothers Karamazov, Alex Donley

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

The purpose of this research is to explore Dostoevsky’s theodicy in The Brothers Karamazov, including key critical commentary that enhances an understanding of the text. One of the novel’s title characters, Ivan, embodies the emerging spirit of intellectualism and freethinking in nineteenth-century Europe. He confronts the Christian concept of God in two famous speeches. First, Ivan’s “Rebellion” epitomizes the problem of evil by asking why an omnipotent, omnibenevolent God allows earthy atrocities. Second, Ivan’s “Grand Inquisitor” rejects the moral freedom given to men, reasoning that it is too great a burden for mankind to bear. These ...


Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko And The Conclusion Of Dostoevsky’S Idiot, Saera Yoon, Robert O. Efird 2019 UNIST

Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko And The Conclusion Of Dostoevsky’S Idiot, Saera Yoon, Robert O. Efird

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko, and the Conclusion of Dostoevsky’s Idiot" Robert O. Efird and Saera Yoon discuss film adaptations of Dostoevsky’s novel. Both in his homeland and abroad, the major works of Fyodor Dostoevsky have largely made for disappointing film adaptations. This article examines the cultural diversity and aesthetic motivations underlying two very different adaptations of his novel Idiot, with particular attention to the concluding scenes. Both Akira Kurosawa and Vladimir Bortko follow the novelist's lead by hinting at some form of hope and future redemption amidst the tragedy but, for different ...


Retro-Future In Post-Soviet Dystopia, Sergey Toymentsev 2019 Moscow State Pedagogical University

Retro-Future In Post-Soviet Dystopia, Sergey Toymentsev

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article “Retro-Future in Post-Soviet Dystopia” Sergey Toymentsev explores the vision of retrospective future in such Russian novels as Tatiana Tolstaya’s The Slynx, Vladimir Sorokin’s Day of the Oprichnik, Olga Slavnikova’s 2017, and Dmitry Bykov’s Zhd. Unlike Zamyatin’s and Platonov’s anti-Soviet satires, post-Soviet dystopias do not respond to any utopian narrative, but project the historical and ideological reality of Russia’s violent (predominantly Soviet) past into the future. Such a traumatic reenactment of the Soviet past in the dystopian future testifies to the rise of authoritarianism in contemporary Russia as well as its ...


Intertextuality, Aesthetics, And The Digital: Rediscovering Chekhov In Early British Modernism, Sam Jacob 2019 Brigham Young University

Intertextuality, Aesthetics, And The Digital: Rediscovering Chekhov In Early British Modernism, Sam Jacob

Modernist Short Story Project

Mark Halliday’s poem, “Chekhov,” published in 1992, raises a simple yet profound question regarding the Russian playwright and author, Anton Chekhov: What do we get from Chekhov? Considering the present article’s particular focus, Halliday’s query may be used to ask how Chekhov influenced early modernist writers (circa 1900-1930) from the British literary context. However, when considering the amount of scholarly work devoted to this question, the initial simplicity of Halliday’s inquiry evaporates, giving way to a breadth of complexity, nuance, and ambiguity. Such ambiguity has led scholars attempting to trace the intertextual convergence between Chekhov and ...


Coming To Terms With Gonzo Journalism : An Analysis In Russian Formalism., Beau Kilpatrick 2019 University of Louisville

Coming To Terms With Gonzo Journalism : An Analysis In Russian Formalism., Beau Kilpatrick

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Gonzo journalism is notoriously difficult to define because of its ambiguous nature. To date, scholarly definitions focus on historical interpretations of Gonzo’s content, its connection to social and political contexts, or the biography of Hunter S. Thompson. These definitional attempts neglect the formal devices of the composition. This thesis aims to redefine Gonzo as its own genre by using the nearly forgotten methods of Russian formalism—specifically the works of Victor Shklovsky, Vladimir Propp, and Boris Tomashevsky—to analyze the formal devices and components of its form. The results are twofold; first, it acts to rejuvenate an unpopular literary ...


Introduction. Dialogues With Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967-1968., Slav N. Gratchev, Irina Evdokimova 2019 Marshall University

Introduction. Dialogues With Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967-1968., Slav N. Gratchev, Irina Evdokimova

Dr. Slav N. Gratchev

Dialogues with Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967–1968 reflects the spirit of times—when the most dramatic events of the twentieth century were happening in Russia and the USSR. The first English translation of the 1967–1968 interviews with the founder of the Formalist School of literary theory, Viktor Shklovsky, this volume offers a slice of Russian micro-history that relies on the living voice of that history. Through the transcription of a six-hour phono-document, the readers will hear the voice of a real participant in events that for the longest time in the USSR were forbidden to be discussed or ...


Visually Mapping The Narrative System Of Dostoevsky's The Idiot, AJ Culpepper 2019 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Visually Mapping The Narrative System Of Dostoevsky's The Idiot, Aj Culpepper

EURēCA: Exhibition of Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement

This research creates a visual system for analyzing Dostoevsky’s The Idiot. I define five factors—space, time, character (individual actor), network (unique aggregate of certain actors), and narrative voice—and visually explore their dyadic and triadic relationships. Taking the dyad of character and network, I identify all named entities within the novel and describe each person to whom they are connected. I then define factors for determining the degree of closeness in each of these relationships, and represent the degree via line value; those more closely related will be connected by thicker, darker lines. Other dyads and triads rely ...


Introduction. Dialogues With Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967-1968., Slav N. Gratchev, Irina Evdokimova 2019 Marshall University

Introduction. Dialogues With Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967-1968., Slav N. Gratchev, Irina Evdokimova

Modern Languages Faculty Research

Dialogues with Shklovsky: The Duvakin Interviews 1967–1968 reflects the spirit of times—when the most dramatic events of the twentieth century were happening in Russia and the USSR. The first English translation of the 1967–1968 interviews with the founder of the Formalist School of literary theory, Viktor Shklovsky, this volume offers a slice of Russian micro-history that relies on the living voice of that history. Through the transcription of a six-hour phono-document, the readers will hear the voice of a real participant in events that for the longest time in the USSR were forbidden to be discussed or ...


Don Quixote In Russia In The 1920s-1930s: The Problem Of Perception And Interpretation, Slav N. Gratchev 2019 Marshall University

Don Quixote In Russia In The 1920s-1930s: The Problem Of Perception And Interpretation, Slav N. Gratchev

Modern Languages Faculty Research

This study logically continues my previous examination of the perception of Don Quixote in Russia throughout the early twentieth century and how this perception changed over time. In this new article, which will be the third in a sequence of five, I will again use a number of materials inaccessible to English-speaking scholars to demonstrate how the perception of Don Quixote by Russian intelligentsia shifted from being skeptical to complete admiration and even glorification of the hero. Don Quixote was increasingly compared with Prometheus, the most powerful and most romanticized personage of Greek methodology. Indeed, “. . . начав юмористический роман, осмеивающий увлечение ...


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