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For Narrativity: How Creating Narratives Structures Experience And Self, Natallia Stelmak Schabner 2017 City University of New York (CUNY)

For Narrativity: How Creating Narratives Structures Experience And Self, Natallia Stelmak Schabner

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation responds to the challenge to narrativity posed by Galen Strawson in “Against Narrativity,” where he claims that not everyone is Narrative by nature and that there is no reason to be. I make my claim “For Narrativity” as a mental process of form finding and coherence seeking over time that is an inherent mental activity and essential for experience of one’s Self. I make my case through examinations of our experience of time, our use of language, how we plan, and our sense of Self. In the first chapter, I show that considering Narrativity as viewing life ...


Tuff Breeches, Arkadiy Ryabin 2017 CUNY Hunter College

Tuff Breeches, Arkadiy Ryabin

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

In consideration of language and it’s relationship to information and knowledge, the author explores personal set of events in relationship to that of the public, via forms of orality. 19th century American literature is posited as a hangover influencing contemporary events.


Musical Life In Russia From 1917-1953, Josiah Kenniv 2017 Cedarville University

Musical Life In Russia From 1917-1953, Josiah Kenniv

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

This research focuses on Russian musical life in the Soviet Era, beginning in the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, to the death of the Joseph Stalin in 1953. Much of the information is taken from books written by Russian authors who attempt to take this massive cultural and political change from the perspective of both the artist and the everyday citizen in Russia. The purpose of this project is to show how governmental reforms change musical life in Russia, and how composers and performers alike adapted to that change.


The Invisible Protagonist: A Reassessment Of Brecht's The Good Person Of Szechwan, Diana Moody, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor 2017 Illinois Wesleyan University

The Invisible Protagonist: A Reassessment Of Brecht's The Good Person Of Szechwan, Diana Moody, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Are You My Venus In Fur? Masochism In German Literature And Film Through A Deleuzian Lens, Kristen Anderson, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor 2017 Illinois Wesleyan University

Are You My Venus In Fur? Masochism In German Literature And Film Through A Deleuzian Lens, Kristen Anderson, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Zamyatin's Reception Of Wells's Fiction, Natalia Aksenova, Marina Khatyamova 2017 National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University

Zamyatin's Reception Of Wells's Fiction, Natalia Aksenova, Marina Khatyamova

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "Zamyatin's Reception of Well's Fiction," Natalia Aksenova and Marina Albertovna Khatyamova examine several essays written by Yevgeny Zamyatin on Herbert Wells's texts and analyse Zamyatin's reception of Wells's work. Wells's ironic mindset, plot-driven writings, and attraction to parody drew Zamyatin's attention. Zamyatin felt a rapport with the central role of plot dynamics, unorthodox socialist politics, and dystopian tendencies in Wells's fiction. Discussions of the artistic qualities of Wells's writings allow Zamyatin to expound upon his own aesthetic program, known as "synthetism." In these discussions Zamyatin interprets Wells's ...


Adapting Skazki: How American Authors Reinvent Russian Fairy Tales, Sarah Krasner 2017 Scripps College

Adapting Skazki: How American Authors Reinvent Russian Fairy Tales, Sarah Krasner

Scripps Senior Theses

Adaptations of works have the potential to bring their subject matter to a new audience. This thesis explores the adaptation of Russian fairy tales into novels by authors Orson Scott Card and Joy Preble by looking at how they present Russian fairy tales, folkloric figures, and fairy tale structure to an American audience.


Tolstoy And Spirituality (Library Resources), Holy Cross Libraries 2017 College of the Holy Cross

Tolstoy And Spirituality (Library Resources), Holy Cross Libraries

Library Resources for Campus Events

A bibliography of resources available through the Holy Cross Libraries which provide additional information related to “Tolstoy and Spirituality,” a conference held at the College of the Holy Cross April 21-22, 2017.

in this conference, an international slate of authors and scholars of Tolstoy's writings analyze his works of fiction and non-fiction to assess the viability and fruitfulness of his approach to Christianity.


The Eurasian Agenda: The International Relations Of Kyrgyzstan, Azamat Baiyzbekov 2016 University of San Francisco

The Eurasian Agenda: The International Relations Of Kyrgyzstan, Azamat Baiyzbekov

Master's Theses

The disintegration of the Soviet Union and the emergence of the newly independent states in Central Asia are among the most important historical events of the 20th century. As one of these newly independent and sovereign state, Kyrgyzstan found itself in the sphere of the geopolitical rivalry among the Great Powers, such as the U.S., Russia, and China. Even though a relatively small and militarily weak state, Kyrgyzstan came to play an important role in their Eurasian agenda. In this thesis, I examine in detail the international relations of Kyrgyzstan with all its neighboring states, but focus extensively ...


Readers In Pursuit Of Popular Justice: Unraveling Conflicting Frameworks In Lolita, Innesa Ranchpar 2016 Chapman University

Readers In Pursuit Of Popular Justice: Unraveling Conflicting Frameworks In Lolita, Innesa Ranchpar

English Theses

This thesis examines the competing frameworks in Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita—the fictional Foreword written by John Ray, Jr., Ph.D. and the manuscript written by Humbert Humbert—in order to understand to what extent the construction manipulates the rhetorical appeal. While previous scholarship isolates the two narrators or focuses on their unreliability, my examination concentrates on the interplay of the frameworks and how their conflicting objectives can be problematic for readers. By drawing upon various theories by Michel Foucault from Power/Knowledge and Louis Althusser’s “On Ideology,” I look into how John Ray, Jr., Ph.D. and Humbert ...


Risd Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective Poster, Agnieszka Taborska, Bill Newkirk 2016 Rhode Island School of Design

Risd Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective Poster, Agnieszka Taborska, Bill Newkirk

RISD Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective

No abstract provided.


Risd Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective Program, Agnieszka Taborska, Bill Newkirk 2016 Rhode Island School of Design

Risd Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective Program, Agnieszka Taborska, Bill Newkirk

RISD Cabaret 1987-2000 Retrospective

No abstract provided.


See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil: The Poetics Of Violence In Isaac Babel's Red Cavalry, Benjamin Julius Dranoff 2016 Bard College

See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil: The Poetics Of Violence In Isaac Babel's Red Cavalry, Benjamin Julius Dranoff

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College


"Between Sunset And River": Nabokov's Bridge To The Otherworld, Jesse R. Weiss 2016 Bard College

"Between Sunset And River": Nabokov's Bridge To The Otherworld, Jesse R. Weiss

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College.


Dostoevsky's "Bobok": A Translation To The Language Of The Stage, Daniel Julian Krakovski 2016 Bard College

Dostoevsky's "Bobok": A Translation To The Language Of The Stage, Daniel Julian Krakovski

Senior Projects Spring 2016

As a joint major in Russian & Eurasian Studies and Theater & Performance, my senior project is a translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s short story entitled “Бобок: записки одного человека” [Bobok: Notes of a Certain Individual] (1873) from Russian into English. This translation then served as the textual foundation for what eventually—after a six-month rehearsal process—became a solo performance featuring an actor named Fergus Baumann. I co-directed the performance in tandem with my collaborator Eileen Goodrich. Our production was featured in the Theater & Performance Senior Project Festival, which provided us with three performances in the Luma Theater of the Richard ...


"Living For The Soul": Dolly's Heroism In Anna Karenina, Mara Minion 2016 Butler University

"Living For The Soul": Dolly's Heroism In Anna Karenina, Mara Minion

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

Most literary critics have either viewed Dolly Oblonsky in Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1877) as a somewhat pitiable character who, unlike Anna, submits to the oppressive patriarchal system, or they have neglected her as an insignificant minor character. I feel that such views are reductive and ignore Dolly’s personal strength compared with Anna’s weak character. Dolly’s heroism goes beyond her social, marital, and maternal status. Dolly “lives for the soul,” demonstrating personal and spiritual virtue (Tolstoy [1877] 794).

Gary Saul Morson is the most important critical voice on the subject of Dolly in Anna Karenina and in ...


Embodied Word, Disembodied Woman: The Ethics And Aesthetics Of Elena Guro, Shelby Ruth Wardlaw 2016 University of Colorado Boulder

Embodied Word, Disembodied Woman: The Ethics And Aesthetics Of Elena Guro, Shelby Ruth Wardlaw

Comparative Literature Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Russian poet, painter, and playwright Elena Guro builds on the Futurist concept of the liberation of the word, extending it to the sphere of meaning construction. She points out that the current construction of meaning demands a humanitarian and moral price. Modernity affirms hierarchical constructions that privilege the strong over the weak, the visible over the invisible, the man-made over the natural. Guro locates the potential for subversion in the subjective gaze of the dreamer, the scatterbrain, the mentally ill, the feminine, and the natural. These categories are not equivalent, yet they share one important feature: they are overlooked by ...


A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers 2015 University of Strathclyde

A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "A Theory of Genre Formation in the Twentieth Century" Michael Rodgers explores the relationship between Vladimir Nabokov's Invitation to a Beheading and magical realism in order to theorize about genre formation in the twentieth century. Rodgers argues not only that specific twentieth-century narrative forms are bound intrinsically with literary realism and socio-political conditions, but also that these factors can produce formal commonalities.


The Crisis Of Self-Understanding In Dostoevsky, Joshua Miller 2015 Liberty University

The Crisis Of Self-Understanding In Dostoevsky, Joshua Miller

The Kabod

This paper seeks to explain the characterization of Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. It makes the argument that Raskolnikov exemplifies the inexhaustible depth of the human consciousness, the quest for self-understanding, and the radical schism of the psyche which Dostoevsky wrote about in other works such as Notes From Underground. Contrasting Crime and Punishment with Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, this paper concludes that Conrad's main character Marlow loses himself in the schism and that Raskolnikov finds peace through confession and repentance.


One Big Thing: Suffering As The Path To New Life In Crime And Punishment, Kelly M. Kramer 2015 Liberty University

One Big Thing: Suffering As The Path To New Life In Crime And Punishment, Kelly M. Kramer

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

After spending a whole semester reading and thinking about Dostoevsky, the main thing that has struck me about him is his treatment of the theme of suffering. Despite, and even through, his extremely complicated characters and events, he nevertheless focuses his novels, particularly Crime and Punishment, on presenting a nuanced yet unified picture of suffering. After a brief analysis of several of the relevant characters and plot points, his thoughts on what suffering does to and for the individual will be presented. In contrast to our culture’s almost idolization of suffering as an experience which gives one instant respect ...


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