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"Living For The Soul": Dolly's Heroism In Anna Karenina, Mara Minion 2016 Butler University

"Living For The Soul": Dolly's Heroism In Anna Karenina, Mara Minion

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

Most literary critics have either viewed Dolly Oblonsky in Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1877) as a somewhat pitiable character who, unlike Anna, submits to the oppressive patriarchal system, or they have neglected her as an insignificant minor character. I feel that such views are reductive and ignore Dolly’s personal strength compared with Anna’s weak character. Dolly’s heroism goes beyond her social, marital, and maternal status. Dolly “lives for the soul,” demonstrating personal and spiritual virtue (Tolstoy [1877] 794).

Gary Saul Morson is the most important critical voice on the subject of Dolly in Anna Karenina and in ...


Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet 2016 Marshall University

Serebrianaia Rybka Nabokova [Nabokov’S Silverfish], Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

No abstract provided.


The Agent Across The Border: "Russia" And "Ukraine" As Actors In The News, 2013-2015, Abbey L. Thomas 2016 University of Kentucky

The Agent Across The Border: "Russia" And "Ukraine" As Actors In The News, 2013-2015, Abbey L. Thomas

Theses and Dissertations--Linguistics

This study examines how two media sources—one Russian and one Ukrainian—portray Russia and Ukraine before, during, and after the EuroMaidan crisis in Ukraine. Russian-language texts posted between January 2013 and December 2015 on the sites Ukranews.com (a Ukrainian news outlet) and TASS.ru (Russian) were organized in a corpus of over 20,000,000 words. This study analyzes the nouns “Россия” (“Russia”) and “Украина” (“Ukraine”) according to the verbal predicates that attach to either noun. The results demonstrate predictable variation in the agency of the two entities in response to cultural events and contexts.

The analysis of ...


Writers And Rebels: The Literature Of Insurgency In The Caucasus (Yale University Press, Table Of Contents), Rebecca Gould 2015 University of Bristol

Writers And Rebels: The Literature Of Insurgency In The Caucasus (Yale University Press, Table Of Contents), Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

Writers and Rebels: The Literature of Insurgency in the Caucasus (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Spring 2016; http://yalebooks.co.uk/display.asp?k=9780300200645). ISBN: 978-0300200645. 336pp


Hesse's Steppenwolf As Modern Ethical Fiction, Michał Koza 2015 Jagiellonian University

Hesse's Steppenwolf As Modern Ethical Fiction, Michał Koza

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Hesse's Steppenwolf as Modern Ethical Fiction" Michał Koza discusses the significance of "ethical fiction" in modern literature. Such fiction, according to Kant, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, are not only milestones of ethical thinking, but more importantly offer a narrative for self-creation as an ethical subject. Harry Haller, the protagonist of Hermann Hesse's Steppenwolf, is a man living on the border of modern subjectivity embodying a cultural and existential crisis. Koza argues that "ethical reading" enables one to see the relation between philosophy and literature that not only enter in a dialogue with each other, but also ...


Russian Anti-Americanism, Public Opinion And The Impact Of The State-Controlled Mass Media, Natalie Manaeva Rice 2015 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Russian Anti-Americanism, Public Opinion And The Impact Of The State-Controlled Mass Media, Natalie Manaeva Rice

Doctoral Dissertations

From 2011 to 2015, a rise in anti-Americanism was strongly reflected in Russian public opinion during President Vladimir Putin’s third term. The study examined the phenomenon of anti-Americanism in Russia and the role of state-controlled mass media in promoting anti-American attitudes. Statistical analysis of polls conducted in Russia by the Pew Research Center in 2012 demonstrated that anti-Americanism in Russian society should not be treated as a monolithic phenomenon. A segment of the Russian populace held a strong and deep-seated anti-American ideological bias that affected its perception of everything related to the United States. Other sentiments, however, fit a ...


Time Distortion In Bierce's "One Of The Missing" And Uroshevic's "Ракописот Од Китаб-Ан" ("The Manuscript From Kitab-An"), Kalina Maleska 2015 Ss. Cyril and Methodius University Skopje

Time Distortion In Bierce's "One Of The Missing" And Uroshevic's "Ракописот Од Китаб-Ан" ("The Manuscript From Kitab-An"), Kalina Maleska

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Time Distortion in Bierce's 'One of the Missing' and Uroshevic's 'Ракописот од Китаб-Ан' ('The Manuscript from Kitab-An')" Kalina Maleska examines the relationship between literature and astronomy in the context of time. The two stories share several common elements: they explore the possible manipulations of time in unexpected and extraordinary ways and come close to certain scientific explorations of time. For "One of the Missing," Albert Einstein's theory of relativity provides an interesting foundation for understanding Bierce's treatment of time. For The Manuscript of Kitab-An, the speculations of time travel starting from the Einstein-Rosen ...


A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers 2015 University of Strathclyde

A Theory Of Genre Formation In The Twentieth Century, Michael Rodgers

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "A Theory of Genre Formation in the Twentieth Century" Michael Rodgers explores the relationship between Vladimir Nabokov's Invitation to a Beheading and magical realism in order to theorize about genre formation in the twentieth century. Rodgers argues not only that specific twentieth-century narrative forms are bound intrinsically with literary realism and socio-political conditions, but also that these factors can produce formal commonalities.


Review Of "The Modernist Masquerade: Stylizing Life, Literature And Costumes In Russia" By C. Mcquillen, Sibelan E.S. Forrester 2015 Swarthmore College

Review Of "The Modernist Masquerade: Stylizing Life, Literature And Costumes In Russia" By C. Mcquillen, Sibelan E.S. Forrester

Russian Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


The Crisis Of Self-Understanding In Dostoevsky, Joshua Miller 2015 Liberty University

The Crisis Of Self-Understanding In Dostoevsky, Joshua Miller

The Kabod

This paper seeks to explain the characterization of Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. It makes the argument that Raskolnikov exemplifies the inexhaustible depth of the human consciousness, the quest for self-understanding, and the radical schism of the psyche which Dostoevsky wrote about in other works such as Notes From Underground. Contrasting Crime and Punishment with Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, this paper concludes that Conrad's main character Marlow loses himself in the schism and that Raskolnikov finds peace through confession and repentance.


One Big Thing: Suffering As The Path To New Life In Crime And Punishment, Kelly M. Kramer 2015 Liberty University

One Big Thing: Suffering As The Path To New Life In Crime And Punishment, Kelly M. Kramer

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

After spending a whole semester reading and thinking about Dostoevsky, the main thing that has struck me about him is his treatment of the theme of suffering. Despite, and even through, his extremely complicated characters and events, he nevertheless focuses his novels, particularly Crime and Punishment, on presenting a nuanced yet unified picture of suffering. After a brief analysis of several of the relevant characters and plot points, his thoughts on what suffering does to and for the individual will be presented. In contrast to our culture’s almost idolization of suffering as an experience which gives one instant respect ...


Power And Pride: The Mythologization Of The Cossack Figure In Russian History And Its Impact On Modern Russian National Identity, Rachael Ulrich 2015 University of Kentucky

Power And Pride: The Mythologization Of The Cossack Figure In Russian History And Its Impact On Modern Russian National Identity, Rachael Ulrich

Kaleidoscope

Our expedition traveled to the Don Cossack Ust- Khopiorskaia Stanitsa to record mythologized cultural practices in the form of rituals and performances. Located on the banks of the Don and Khopior River junction, about 1,500 people reside in a village consisting of several streets of wooden and stone houses, a cultural center, a school, and a few small markets. Most remaining residents in the village are pensioners, who support their meager incomes with backyard gardens. The young who have finished primary school leave for the nearest city, Volgograd, to find work or pursue further studies, because opportunities for neither ...


Resilient Russian Women In The 1920s & 1930s, Marcelline Hutton 2015 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Resilient Russian Women In The 1920s & 1930s, Marcelline Hutton

Zea E-Books

The stories of Russian educated women, peasants, prisoners, workers, wives, and mothers of the 1920s and 1930s show how work, marriage, family, religion, and even patriotism helped sustain them during harsh times.

The Russian Revolution launched an economic and social upheaval that released peasant women from the control of traditional extended families. It promised urban women equality and created opportunities for employment and higher education. Yet, the revolution did little to eliminate Russian patriarchal culture, which continued to undermine women’s social, sexual, economic, and political conditions. Divorce and abortion became more widespread, but birth control remained limited, and sexual ...


The Literary Unconscious: Ideology And Utopia In The Nineteenth-Century Realist Novel In England And Russia, Isra Ahmed Daraiseh 2015 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

The Literary Unconscious: Ideology And Utopia In The Nineteenth-Century Realist Novel In England And Russia, Isra Ahmed Daraiseh

Theses and Dissertations

In this volume, I have examined a number of works of nineteenth-century realist fiction from England and Russia, using the double interpretive method recommended by Fredric Jameson in The Political Unconscious. In particular, I have employed the dialectical double hermeneutic suggested by Jameson, who argues that the most productive approach to literary texts is to consider them from the double perspective of ideology and utopia. That is, critics should approach literary texts by seeking out the ideological roots that lie beneath the textual surface and from which the texts grow, while at the same time keeping a careful eye out ...


De-Coding Intertextuality In Classic And Postmodern Russian Narratives, Natalia Olshanskaya 2015 Kenyon College

De-Coding Intertextuality In Classic And Postmodern Russian Narratives, Natalia Olshanskaya

Natalia Olshanskaya

Based on the comparison of intertextual references in several English translations of Fedor Dostoevskii’s Notes From the Underground and Victor Pelevin’s “The Ninth Dream of Vera Pavlovna,” the article addresses general issues of translating intertextual references in narratives. Special attention is devoted to the problems of reception of postmodern texts and the question of the translator’s ‘invisibility.’


Anti-Utopian Carnival: Vladimir Voinovich Rewriting George Orwell, Natalia Olshanskaya 2015 Kenyon College

Anti-Utopian Carnival: Vladimir Voinovich Rewriting George Orwell, Natalia Olshanskaya

Natalia Olshanskaya

No abstract provided.


Opposition Or Identification: Chekhov's Plays On Screen, Natalia Olshanskaya 2015 Kenyon College

Opposition Or Identification: Chekhov's Plays On Screen, Natalia Olshanskaya

Natalia Olshanskaya

No abstract provided.


Linguistic Landscape Of Main Streets In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Rachel E. Lay 2015 East Tennessee State University

Linguistic Landscape Of Main Streets In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Rachel E. Lay

Undergraduate Honors Theses

After the breakup of Yugoslavia in 1991, Bosnia and Herzegovina erupted into ethnic conflict and ultimately genocide. Nearly 100,000 people, mainly Bosniaks, died in the Bosnian War. Two decades later, the violence has ended but the conflict is still present in Bosnia; the societal segregation of the 1995 Dayton Accords, intended only as an immediate solution to the violence, still stands. Population and language distribution are evidence of this segregation. Bosnia’s two entities are home to two different ethnic majorities: Serbs in the Republika Srpska and Bosniaks in the Federation of BiH. In an environment so sensitive that ...


Linguistic Landscape Of Main Streets In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Rachel E. Lay 2015 East Tennessee State University

Linguistic Landscape Of Main Streets In Bosnia And Herzegovina, Rachel E. Lay

Undergraduate Honors Theses

After the breakup of Yugoslavia in 1991, Bosnia and Herzegovina erupted into ethnic conflict and ultimately genocide. Nearly 100,000 people, mainly Bosniaks, died in the Bosnian War. Two decades later, the violence has ended but the conflict is still present in Bosnia; the societal segregation of the 1995 Dayton Accords, intended only as an immediate solution to the violence, still stands. Population and language distribution are evidence of this segregation. Bosnia’s two entities are home to two different ethnic majorities: Serbs in the Republika Srpska and Bosniaks in the Federation of BiH. In an environment so sensitive that ...


Themes Of Self-Laceration Towards A Modicum Of Control In Nineteenth Century Russia As Expressed By Dostoevsky In The Brothers Karamazov, Jonathan Ball 2015 East Tennessee State University

Themes Of Self-Laceration Towards A Modicum Of Control In Nineteenth Century Russia As Expressed By Dostoevsky In The Brothers Karamazov, Jonathan Ball

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The majority of the academic discourse surrounding Dostoevsky and his epic, The Brothers Karamazov, has been directed toward the philosophic and religious implications of his characters. Largely overlooked, however, is the theme of laceration. In the greater scope of laceration stands the topic of self-laceration. Self-laceration refers to the practice of causing harm to the self in a premeditated and specifically emotionally destructive fashion. The cause of this experience is varied and expressed in as many ways as there are individuals. The struggle in the Russian psyche between viewing the world as fatalistic or as more of an existential experience ...


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