Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Slavic Languages and Societies Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

719 Full-Text Articles 658 Authors 491,753 Downloads 87 Institutions

All Articles in Slavic Languages and Societies

Faceted Search

719 full-text articles. Page 5 of 21.

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph McMullen, Kristen Carella 2017 Harvard University/Centenary University

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Religious Identities In Southeastern Europe: Pomaks In Greece And Bulgaria: Behind The State Valance, Stefan Ubiparipović 2017 University of Belgrade, Serbia and Karl Franzens University in Graz, Austria

Religious Identities In Southeastern Europe: Pomaks In Greece And Bulgaria: Behind The State Valance, Stefan Ubiparipović

Occasional Papers on Religion in Eastern Europe

First, I will briefly explain the important events that have coincided or strongly influenced Pomak identity during the twentieth century. Several Greek and Bulgarian state policies will be mentioned for they served as fierce attempts to essentially change Pomaks. This segment here will focus on the events that occurred between the end of World War I and shortly before the fall of the Soviet Union. Next, this paper will focus on the period after the fall of communism in Europe and attempt to address the current state policies towards Pomaks. Bulgaria and Greece, as major Orthodox Christian countries, have distinct ...


Rasputin And The Fragmentation Of Imperial Russia, Jessie Radcliffe 2017 St. Mary's Academy

Rasputin And The Fragmentation Of Imperial Russia, Jessie Radcliffe

Young Historians Conference

In 1917 the Romanov Dynasty ended as did Imperial Russia. Faced with years of political, social and economic instability tracing back to the Revolution of 1905, it was only a matter of time before everything fell apart. This paper analyzes the role in which Gregory Rasputin played in further polarizing the many facets of Russian society and priming the country for the Revolution of 1917.


Musical Life In Russia From 1917-1953, Josiah Kenniv 2017 Cedarville University

Musical Life In Russia From 1917-1953, Josiah Kenniv

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

This research focuses on Russian musical life in the Soviet Era, beginning in the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, to the death of the Joseph Stalin in 1953. Much of the information is taken from books written by Russian authors who attempt to take this massive cultural and political change from the perspective of both the artist and the everyday citizen in Russia. The purpose of this project is to show how governmental reforms change musical life in Russia, and how composers and performers alike adapted to that change.


Stalinist Cosmopolitanism, Steven S. Lee 2017 University of California, Berkeley

Stalinist Cosmopolitanism, Steven S. Lee

Criticism

Review of Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941 by Katerina Clark. Cambridge, MA: harvard University Press, 2011. Pp. 432. $38.50 cloth.


The Invisible Protagonist: A Reassessment Of Brecht's The Good Person Of Szechwan, Diana Moody, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor 2017 Illinois Wesleyan University

The Invisible Protagonist: A Reassessment Of Brecht's The Good Person Of Szechwan, Diana Moody, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Are You My Venus In Fur? Masochism In German Literature And Film Through A Deleuzian Lens, Kristen Anderson, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor 2017 Illinois Wesleyan University

Are You My Venus In Fur? Masochism In German Literature And Film Through A Deleuzian Lens, Kristen Anderson, Adam Woodis, Faculty Advisor

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Identifying Impressions Of Baba Yaga: Navigating The Uses Of Attachment And Wonder On Soviet And American Television, M. Armknecht, J. T. Rudy, Sibelan E.S. Forrester 2017 Swarthmore College

Identifying Impressions Of Baba Yaga: Navigating The Uses Of Attachment And Wonder On Soviet And American Television, M. Armknecht, J. T. Rudy, Sibelan E.S. Forrester

Russian Faculty Works

The rise of Baba Yaga on international television provides an excellent case study for analyzing viewing practices associated with identification and allegiance. In analyzing Baba Yaga’s presence on Soviet and American television, we argue that viewing wonder tales leads to deep and lasting identification, attachment, and allegiance. Baba Yaga’s presence and popularity on Russian and American television allows us to explore how forming such deep impressions of a traditional character on television can provide trans-cultural viewers with tools to navigate between imagination and reality, thus helping them to better understand the ambiguities of life, including transnational cultural politics.


Alternative Notions Of Dissent: Punk Rock’S Significance In The Soviet Union And East Germany, Gabrielle E. Hibbert 2017 College of William and Mary

Alternative Notions Of Dissent: Punk Rock’S Significance In The Soviet Union And East Germany, Gabrielle E. Hibbert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The punk movement arrived in the late 1970s in the United States and United Kingdom, creating non-traditional and experimental ways in which to produce music. As the movement grew it developed a foundational ideology geared towards a more inclusive civil society. With globalization, some scholars viewed the international movements as derivative from the founding American and British movements. However, its arrival in the Soviet Union and East Germany, two regions that faced mass social and political repression, serve as two counter models to the idea of the derivational international punk movement.

Taking on the foundational ideology of the American and ...


Depictions Of Fear In Lev Tolstoy's Sevastopol Sketches And Stephen Crane's The Red Badge Of Courage, Ralph Willard Schusler Jr 2017 Florida International University

Depictions Of Fear In Lev Tolstoy's Sevastopol Sketches And Stephen Crane's The Red Badge Of Courage, Ralph Willard Schusler Jr

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this thesis was to examine and compare two iconoclastic works dealing with war as experienced by combatants. So much of modern war fiction takes this perspective that one is hard pressed to imagine a time when such was not the case; the watershed was marked in the above named works by the aforementioned writers, which, and who, were first in putting readers inside the heads of common soldiers facing mortal danger. These pioneering authors opened the door to modernist writing about boundary situations involving existential threat, as well as the psychological reactions they evoke – especially fear. Depicting ...


Zamyatin's Reception Of Wells's Fiction, Natalia Aksenova, Marina Khatyamova 2017 National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University

Zamyatin's Reception Of Wells's Fiction, Natalia Aksenova, Marina Khatyamova

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "Zamyatin's Reception of Well's Fiction," Natalia Aksenova and Marina Albertovna Khatyamova examine several essays written by Yevgeny Zamyatin on Herbert Wells's texts and analyse Zamyatin's reception of Wells's work. Wells's ironic mindset, plot-driven writings, and attraction to parody drew Zamyatin's attention. Zamyatin felt a rapport with the central role of plot dynamics, unorthodox socialist politics, and dystopian tendencies in Wells's fiction. Discussions of the artistic qualities of Wells's writings allow Zamyatin to expound upon his own aesthetic program, known as "synthetism." In these discussions Zamyatin interprets Wells's ...


Ellis H. Minns And Nikodim Kondakov’S The Russian Icon (1927), Wendy Salmond 2017 Chapman University

Ellis H. Minns And Nikodim Kondakov’S The Russian Icon (1927), Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Books and Book Chapters

"Kondakov’s magnum opus [The Russian Icon] failed to win an audience. Though it appeared just in time for a surge of popular interest in Russian icons abroad, it never became the book of choice for the English-speaking public seeking a guide through the ‘dark forest’ of the icon’s history... My chapter offers some suggestions for why this crude caricature of Kondakov’s work took hold in the 1920s and became axiomatic throughout the Soviet period. In particular, it considers the role that Minns’s translation may have played, however inadvertently, in cementing this impression. Minns’s interventions in ...


Criticism And Complaint In Soldiers’ Narratives Of The Chechen Wars, Courtney Silver 2017 University of Colorado at Boulder

Criticism And Complaint In Soldiers’ Narratives Of The Chechen Wars, Courtney Silver

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The ideological vacuum left by the absence of a strong state in the post-Soviet structure as well as pre-existing poor conditions in the Russian Army led to significant losses in men, morale, and public trust during the first and second Chechen Wars. The Russian soldiers who fought in these wars were faced with the lack of a framework with which to interpret their service and participation in military action that often perpetuated human rights abuses. The meaninglessness of the conflicts was compounded by the absence of public support for veterans as they returned home. This led to a need to ...


An Unusual State Of Matter (Russian Translation), Victor Fet 2017 Marshall University

An Unusual State Of Matter (Russian Translation), Victor Fet

Biological Sciences Faculty Research

A selection of science poems by Roald Hoffmann (Cornell University). Translated into Russian by Victor Fet. Dedicated to the 80th birthday of this famous chemist.


Does Russia Love The Whip?, Maeve Emma McQueeny 2017 Bard College

Does Russia Love The Whip?, Maeve Emma Mcqueeny

Senior Projects Spring 2017

State-sponsored violence has permeated the lives of the Russian people for over a millennium. But it has been and is accepted as the price to be paid for national security to combat enemies from without and within, and to keep the country moving forward.

I will show the persuasive methods that allow totalitarian conditions to prevail in a society: from distortion of national memory to romanticize violence; coping mechanisms which breed a mentality of unawareness and denial that allow for the perpetuation of violence; and the effect of transgenerational trauma which allows violence to infect family tradition. I will show ...


Adapting Skazki: How American Authors Reinvent Russian Fairy Tales, Sarah Krasner 2017 Scripps College

Adapting Skazki: How American Authors Reinvent Russian Fairy Tales, Sarah Krasner

Scripps Senior Theses

Adaptations of works have the potential to bring their subject matter to a new audience. This thesis explores the adaptation of Russian fairy tales into novels by authors Orson Scott Card and Joy Preble by looking at how they present Russian fairy tales, folkloric figures, and fairy tale structure to an American audience.


Ideological Infection In Dostoevsky's "Demons", Sam Joshua Reed 2017 Bard College

Ideological Infection In Dostoevsky's "Demons", Sam Joshua Reed

Senior Projects Spring 2017

This project is an exploration of ideology in Dostoevsky's 1871 novel "Demons." In this work, Dostoevsky portrays the connection between utopianism and extremism. This project explores how romantic and political idealism becomes the foundation for violence and terrorism, through the relationship of the 1840's liberal Stepan Trofimovich Verhovensky and his nihilistic sons.


The Genetics Of Morality: Policing Science In Dudintsev’S White Robes, Yvonne Howell 2017 University of Richmond

The Genetics Of Morality: Policing Science In Dudintsev’S White Robes, Yvonne Howell

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Faculty Publications

The Men and women in White Robes (Belye odezhdv), Vladimir Dudinstev's fictional account of the banning of genetics in the Soviet Union, are acutely aware that in the 20th century, the study of the fruit fly is the study of man. The key to unraveling the mystery of human nature lies in the easily observed chromosomes of the forbidden fly (drosophila melanogaster). Under Stalin, the banned geneticists were branded “Morganists” after their hero Thomas Hunt Morgan, the Columbia University researcher who pioneered the technique of mapping locations on drosophila chromosomes to specific traits in the flies. To find the ...


Exodus, Henry Lowell Cabot 2017 Bard College

Exodus, Henry Lowell Cabot

Senior Projects Spring 2017

Senior Project submitted to the Division of Social Studies of Bard College


Ofengenden, Ari Curriculum Vitae, Ari Ofengenden 2017 Brandeis University

Ofengenden, Ari Curriculum Vitae, Ari Ofengenden

CLCWeb Library

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress