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Native American Studies Commons

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Review Of Nicholas Black Elk: Medicine Man, Catechist, Saint, Ryan C. Hendrickson Dr. 2021 Eastern Illinois University

Review Of Nicholas Black Elk: Medicine Man, Catechist, Saint, Ryan C. Hendrickson Dr.

Jesuit Higher Education: A Journal

No abstract provided.


Wabanaki Youth In Science (Ways) Wskitkamikw "Earth" Camp Application, Wabanaki Center, University of Maine 2021 The University of Maine

Wabanaki Youth In Science (Ways) Wskitkamikw "Earth" Camp Application, Wabanaki Center, University Of Maine

General University of Maine Publications

WaYS is a long-term program to engage Wabanaki students (grades 6-12) through their cultural heritage and environmental legacy to encourage and promote persistence in sciences through college and into a career. Innovative and unique, WaYS engages students in a year-long multi pronged program through a one-week summer Earth Camp, year-long internships/mentorships for high school students; and year-long Traditional Ecological Knowledge programs through Teen Centers or tribal Boys/Girls Clubs. Critical for success, it provides each student with mentoring from both cultural knowledge-keepers and natural resource professionals.


Object: Tbd A Reflective Essay On The Nature Of The Yet-To-Be-Decided Object In Exhibition Design, Anirudh Shaktawat 2021 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Object: Tbd A Reflective Essay On The Nature Of The Yet-To-Be-Decided Object In Exhibition Design, Anirudh Shaktawat

Field Notes: A Journal of Collegiate Anthropology

In the year 2018 the Field Museum in Chicago, in response to the contemporary demands of inclusivity and decolonization, declared that it will redesign its Native American Hall. The developers and curators, in collaboration with Native American communities and curators from Chicago and elsewhere, came up with a list of 6 ‘truths’ about the community. By basing the show on these truths, the aim was to create a plan for an exhibition that can re-educate the public and dispel stereotypes associated with Native Americans. Within the abstract space of the exhibition plan many spots were labeled OBJECT: TBD (to-be-decided), which ...


A New Way To Research: The Benefits And Future Of Indigenous Archaeologies, Isabella Pipp 2021 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

A New Way To Research: The Benefits And Future Of Indigenous Archaeologies, Isabella Pipp

Field Notes: A Journal of Collegiate Anthropology

Indigenous archaeologies allow for new methodologies and theoretical approaches into archaeological studies by promoting collaborative research. This paper explores specific approaches, including member-orientated interpretations, language and lifeway advocacy, collaborative workshops, and insertion of intellectual property rights into research. This paper demonstrates that Indigenous and archaeological ontologies do not have to oppose one another and the integration of both reflect a relevant and holistic type of study. It is argued that archaeologists need to rethink their approaches as scientists when working with Indigenous communities and to readily integrate participatory methodologies to create an inclusive, pluralistic, and critical archaeology.


Bibliography For "Native American Art: A Display In Celebration Of Native American Heritage", Margaret Puentes 2021 Chapman University

Bibliography For "Native American Art: A Display In Celebration Of Native American Heritage", Margaret Puentes

Library Displays and Bibliographies

A bibliography created to accompany a display about Native American art from November 1-30, 2021, at the Leatherby Libraries at Chapman University.


Roots Of Justice: Historical Truth And Reconciliation In Lincoln And Nebraska, Veronica Nohemi Duran, Crystal Dunning, Kathleen A. Johnson, Paul Olson 2021 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Roots Of Justice: Historical Truth And Reconciliation In Lincoln And Nebraska, Veronica Nohemi Duran, Crystal Dunning, Kathleen A. Johnson, Paul Olson

Truth & Reconciliation History Project

A bibliography of resources about the history in Nebraska of Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans and Recent Refugees

We hope that these five bibliographies will prove fruitful in helping us to understand what our history has been, where we have gone astray, and what we can do to help bring about reconciliation in our community and in our state.

The discovery of what has happened in Nebraska in the last hundred and seventy years is not an easy task, but it is our goal in putting together this bibliography to begin that task. By putting together a picture ...


An Uncomfortable Truth: Indigenous Communities And Law In New England: Roger Williams University Law Review Symposium 10/22/2021, Roger Williams University School of Law 2021 Roger Williams University

An Uncomfortable Truth: Indigenous Communities And Law In New England: Roger Williams University Law Review Symposium 10/22/2021, Roger Williams University School Of Law

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Diversity In Native American Literature, Sarah E. Guistwite 2021 Gettysburg College

Diversity In Native American Literature, Sarah E. Guistwite

Student Publications

Native American literature, and Native American culture as a whole, has often been portrayed through the lens of a single story. It is assumed that Native American authors are all the same, and that their works are all the same as well. During the Native American Renaissance period, Native American authors wrote works that fought back against this idea. Their writings are diverse, and show a depth of culture that is often presumed to be nonexistent. Two authors, N. Scott Momaday and Elizabeth Cook- Lynn, demonstrate this diversity through their goals in writing, reasons for writing, and forms of writing ...


Migration And Identity In Host-Communities: Global North And South Influence On Ecuadorian Identity, Jefferson F. Cruz Ruales 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Migration And Identity In Host-Communities: Global North And South Influence On Ecuadorian Identity, Jefferson F. Cruz Ruales

Graduate Masters Theses

In the South American region that encompasses Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela, patterns of human mobility have been predominantly influenced by various forms of internal conflict and limited economic prospects. The relative political, social, and economic stability which Ecuador has experienced in the region since the beginning of the 21st century, however, has made it a desired destination for many of its neighbor’s displaced populations and opportunity seekers. Similar factors have also enticed certain populations proceeding from areas of higher global development to settle into the nation’s tranquil environment. These Ecuadorian circumstances allow two very distinct groups of individuals ...


An Aesthetic Of Authenticity: The Use Of Turquoise In American (Counter)Culture, Madison Staples 2021 Bridgewater State University

An Aesthetic Of Authenticity: The Use Of Turquoise In American (Counter)Culture, Madison Staples

Honors Program Theses and Projects

Turquoise is a distinctive part of the material culture of the Indigenous tribes of the American Southwest, including the Navajo, Hopi, Zuni, and Pueblo peoples. The stone, particularly its color, is situated within complex systems of culture and meaning for each tribe, but the physical nature of material culture makes such pieces accessible for outsiders to borrow, buy, or steal. The aesthetic of the southwestern Indigenous tribe, traced in this paper through the use of turquoise, has been drawn upon by non-Native Westerners pursuing authenticity in their American lives. My findings suggest that true authenticity is marked by authentic engagement ...


Uncommon Ground: Pawtucket-Pennacook Strategic Land Exchange In Native Spaces And Colonized Places Of Essex County And Massachusetts Bay In The Seventeenth Century, Kristine Malpica 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Uncommon Ground: Pawtucket-Pennacook Strategic Land Exchange In Native Spaces And Colonized Places Of Essex County And Massachusetts Bay In The Seventeenth Century, Kristine Malpica

Graduate Masters Theses

This thesis analyzes the historical, legal, and cultural dimensions and processes of land exchange between the Pawtucket-Pennacook and English colonists of Massachusetts Bay Company/Colony, in the seventeenth century. A close reading of colonial archives, reveals political and socio-economic factors, which initially motivated the Pawtucket-Pennacook to trade, share their homelands and ally with the English, forging a brief middle ground period. Through re-interpretation of legal documents and colonial sources, this study illustrates how the Pawtucket-Pennacook attempted to maintain sovereignty and territorial autonomy over Native spaces, which became some of the earliest colonized places in Massachusetts Bay. This research updates and ...


Como Lobos, David Andrew Place 2021 University of Texas at El Paso

Como Lobos, David Andrew Place

Open Access Theses & Dissertations

In a world of conflict, Storm Crow, a Comanche warrior, leads a war party making its way through Mexico and Texas, stealing horses, abducting children, and wreaking chaos as he seeks spiritual and magical power, increasing his notoriety and prowess as a warrior. During one raid, Storm Crow abducts a white child, six-year-old Wade Vance. When Wade tries to escape, Storm Crow attempts to shoot him. When Storm Crow's gun fails twice, he realizes that the boy is not meant to die and adopts him, renaming Wade, "Broken Gun," in praise of the perceived magical intervention, the gun misfiring ...


A Métis Wife's Tale: Race, Womanhood, And Adaptation To Settler Colonialism In The Diaries Of Mary Hobart Williams, Rachael Schnurr 2021 Eastern Michigan University

A Métis Wife's Tale: Race, Womanhood, And Adaptation To Settler Colonialism In The Diaries Of Mary Hobart Williams, Rachael Schnurr

Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

As the War of 1812 drew to a stalemate, the American government began the process of state formation in the "Old Northwest," which put political, economic, and cultural pressures on the indigenous population. Among the Anishinaabeg, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, and other Native inhabitants, however, were fifty-three communities of mixed ancestry produced by the fur trade: the Great Lakes Metis. This project looks at the ways the Metis of Green Bay adapted to the pressures of settler colonialism through the nineteenth century. In particular, it uses the diaries of a French-Menominee woman named Mary Hobart Williams to identify examples of "survivance, "or ...


Website Capture: Native American Programs, University of Maine, Native American Studies Program 2020 The University of Maine

Website Capture: Native American Programs, University Of Maine, Native American Studies Program

General University of Maine Publications

Through the Native American programs website, you can access information about Native American Studies, the Wabanaki Center, the Native American Tuition Waiver and Scholarship Program, and information about University of Maine programs that promote, support and provide educational opportunities for and about Wabanaki peoples across the State of Maine and beyond.


Nolan Alvater Receives Honorable Mention For The Udall Scholarship In Native American Policy, Margaret Nagle 2020 University of Maine Division of Marketing and Communication

Nolan Alvater Receives Honorable Mention For The Udall Scholarship In Native American Policy, Margaret Nagle

General University of Maine Publications

Nolan Altvater of Milford, a University of Maine rising senior majoring in secondary education and minoring in English, was selected as one of 55 students nationwide to receive Honorable Mention for the Udall Scholarship in the Native American policy category.


Wabanaki Youth Science (Ways) Newsletter, Spring 2020, Wabanaki Center, University of Maine 2020 The University of Maine

Wabanaki Youth Science (Ways) Newsletter, Spring 2020, Wabanaki Center, University Of Maine

General University of Maine Publications

WaYS is a long-term program to engage Wabanaki students (grades 6-12) through their cultural heritage and environmental legacy to encourage and promote persistence in sciences through college and into a career. Innovative and unique, WaYS engages students in a year-long multi pronged program through a one-week summer Earth Camp, year-long internships/mentorships for high school students; and year-long Traditional Ecological Knowledge programs through Teen Centers or tribal Boys/Girls Clubs. Critical for success, it provides each student with mentoring from both cultural knowledge-keepers and natural resource professionals.


Worksheet For Native American Studies Guidelines For Independent Course Work, University of Maine, Native American Studies Program 2018 The University of Maine

Worksheet For Native American Studies Guidelines For Independent Course Work, University Of Maine, Native American Studies Program

General University of Maine Publications

The Native American Studies (NAS) minor is open to all undergraduate, degree-seeking University of Maine students. To declare a minor, obtain a Change of Program/Plan/Sub-Plan form from The Native American Programs office located at Corbett Hall, room 208, or online at https://studentrecords.umaine.edu/forms/. For more information, please contact Darren Ranco, Chair of Native American Programs at darren.ranco at maine.edu or 207-581-1417.


College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences Native American Studies Program, University of Maine, Native American Studies Program 2018 The University of Maine

College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences Native American Studies Program, University Of Maine, Native American Studies Program

General University of Maine Publications

Native American Studies is an interdisciplinary minor committed to the study of the cultures, values, history and contemporary life of the American Indian nations and people of North America with a focus on the Wabanaki Nations of Maine and the Maritimes. The importance and significance of the indigenous people are critical in understanding the settler nation-states in which we live. The Native American Studies minor creates an understanding of the unique legacy of American Indians and their continuing relationship to the development of the United States and Canada. Specific emphasis is placed on the Wabanaki peoples of Maine and Canada ...


Undergraduate Minor In Native American Studies, University of Maine, Native American Studies Program 2018 The University of Maine

Undergraduate Minor In Native American Studies, University Of Maine, Native American Studies Program

General University of Maine Publications

The Native American Studies (NAS) minor is open to all undergraduate, degree-seeking University of Maine students. To declare a minor, obtain a Change of Program/Plan/Sub-Plan form from The Native American Programs office located at Corbett Hall, room 208, or online at https://studentrecords.umaine.edu/forms/. For more information, please contact Darren Ranco, Chair of Native American Programs at darren.ranco at maine.edu or 207-581-1417.


Wabanaki Youth Science (Ways) Newsletter, Spring 2018, Wabanaki Center, University of Maine 2018 The University of Maine

Wabanaki Youth Science (Ways) Newsletter, Spring 2018, Wabanaki Center, University Of Maine

General University of Maine Publications

WaYS is a long-term program to engage Wabanaki students (grades 6-12) through their cultural heritage and environmental legacy to encourage and promote persistence in sciences through college and into a career. Innovative and unique, WaYS engages students in a year-long multi pronged program through a one-week summer Earth Camp, year-long internships/mentorships for high school students; and year-long Traditional Ecological Knowledge programs through Teen Centers or tribal Boys/Girls Clubs. Critical for success, it provides each student with mentoring from both cultural knowledge-keepers and natural resource professionals.


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