Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Indigenous Studies Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1,494 Full-Text Articles 1,402 Authors 577,255 Downloads 162 Institutions

All Articles in Indigenous Studies

Faceted Search

1,494 full-text articles. Page 1 of 45.

Apology Dice - Collaborative Conversation About Reconciliation, Clement Yeh 2020 Thompson Rivers University

Apology Dice - Collaborative Conversation About Reconciliation, Clement Yeh

Teaching Practices Colloquium

The Apology Dice is an interactive art performance that engages small groups in conversation—about Indian Residential Schools, colonialization, and possibilities of reconciliation— through the rolling of large, custom-made cedar dice. Each die is cast one at a time to form a sentence. The words on the first die read: “I am” / “We are” / “They are”. The second reads: “so” / “fairly” / “really” / “not” / “somewhat” / “deeply”. The third die displays “sorry” on five sides and “tired of this” on the remaining side. The participant reads the sentence aloud and interprets its meaning, in the context of First Nations reconciliation in Canada ...


Now Is The Time, Jodi McDavid 2020 Cape Breton University

Now Is The Time, Jodi Mcdavid

Journal of Religion & Film

This is a film review of Now is the Time (2019) directed by Christopher Auchter.


“We Don't Care About These Kids”: Chicago, Ethnic Studies, And The Politics Of Caring, Cinthya Rodriguez 2020 Northwestern University

“We Don't Care About These Kids”: Chicago, Ethnic Studies, And The Politics Of Caring, Cinthya Rodriguez

#CritEdPol: Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies at Swarthmore College

This article juxtaposes two recent Chicago Public Schools (CPS) policies and expands upon Angela Valenzuela’s (1999) “politics of caring.” Given the unique space of Chicago for modeling neoliberal school reform policies, I analyze both the 2013 massive CPS closings that targeted predominantly Black communities and the subsequent institutionalization of African American and Latina/o Studies through CPS committees and curriculum. These CPS school closings and ethnic studies policies, I argue, mark a foundational relationship of racial and colonial power between students and communities of color and the settler city-state. Drawing upon community testimonies, news and popular media, and critical ...


The Precolumbian Textiles In The Roemer- And Pelizaeus-Museum Hildesheim, Germany, Lena Bjerregaard 2020 University of Copenhagen

The Precolumbian Textiles In The Roemer- And Pelizaeus-Museum Hildesheim, Germany, Lena Bjerregaard

Zea E-Books

Along the coast of Peru is one of the driest deserts in the world. Here, under the sand, the ancient Peruvians buried their dead wrapped in gorgeous textiles. As organic material keeps almost forever when stored without humidity, light and oxygen, many of the mummies excavated in the last hundred years are in excellent conditions. And so are the textiles wrapped around them. Their clear colors are still dazzling and the textile fibers in good condition. Textiles were highly valued objects in ancient Peru – used for expressing status and diverse messages in these non-literate but highly organized and very developed ...


Prehistoric Chaco Canyon, New Mexico: Empty Pilgrimage Center Of The Anasazi Hegemony, Larry Benson, John R. Stein, Richard W. Loose 2020 University of Colorado at Boulder

Prehistoric Chaco Canyon, New Mexico: Empty Pilgrimage Center Of The Anasazi Hegemony, Larry Benson, John R. Stein, Richard W. Loose

USGS Staff -- Published Research

Chaco has long been considered a semi-urban environment where elites residing in great houses oversaw the labors of approximately 2,000 individuals occupying small 2 houses on Chaco’s valley floor. Recent studies cast doubt on the Canyon’s ability to provide sufficient meat and maize to sustain a population this large and indicate that archaeological maize and archaeofauna found in the Canyon came from the periphery of the San Juan Basin. An alternative model for Chaco is hereby proposed wherein it was a largely vacant monumental complex to which people from outlying areas made pilgrimage along ceremonial roads. The ...


American Indian Social Work Students: Factors That Influence Success In Graduate School, Kellie A. Thompson, Arianne L. Posey, Lindsey K. Manshack 2020 Washington University in St. Louis

American Indian Social Work Students: Factors That Influence Success In Graduate School, Kellie A. Thompson, Arianne L. Posey, Lindsey K. Manshack

Buder Center for American Indian Studies Research

Introduction:

Many barriers exist for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students pursuing advanced degrees. The Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis has a higher than average graduation rate for AI/AN students. The purpose of this article is to understand the lived experiences of AI/AN students at the Brown School and how the experiences influence graduation rates.

Methods:

This study collected data from Brown School alumni who were associated with the Buder Center between 1991 and 2013; nine interviews were analyzed.

Results:

Six themes were identified: 1) AI/AN student cohort, 2) social work skill development ...


Training American Indian And Alaska Native Social Workers For Indian Country, Molly Tovar, Kellie Thompson, Shanondora Billiot 2020 Washington University in St. Louis

Training American Indian And Alaska Native Social Workers For Indian Country, Molly Tovar, Kellie Thompson, Shanondora Billiot

Buder Center for American Indian Studies Research

This study reviews student's perspectives of an American Indian and Alaska Native Indian Studies center in a Master of Social Work degree (MSW) program from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. The article describes the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies many contributions over the years and how it continues to grow in innovative ways. This article begins by considering the social, economic, and historical circumstances that make Native-focused training in social work critical to the future of Indian Country. The article then discusses the founding of the center, the curriculum, program offerings and ...


Beyond A Mapping Exercise: Inclusion Of Aboriginal Traditional Ecological Knowledge In Parks And Protected Areas Management, David Cook 2020 Wilfrid Laurier University

Beyond A Mapping Exercise: Inclusion Of Aboriginal Traditional Ecological Knowledge In Parks And Protected Areas Management, David Cook

Theses and Dissertations (Comprehensive)

This paper examines current approaches for Parks and Protected Areas (PPA) managers in incorporating Aboriginal Traditional and Ecological Knowledge (ATEK) into their management plans. This paper focuses on two case-studies. They are Nahanni National Park and Reserve in the Dehcho region of the Northwest Territories, and the Whitefeather Forest Protected Area in the Pikangikum First Nations Traditional Territory in Ontario. They were chosen because of their unique approaches to include Aboriginal communities in the planning process and their designation as UNESCO World Heritage sites. The broader indigenous involvement policies of both Parks Canada and Ontario Parks are examined using academic ...


Unangan Orthodox Christianity: Conversion Through Similarity, Robert Daley 2019 Dominican University of California

Unangan Orthodox Christianity: Conversion Through Similarity, Robert Daley

Master of Arts in Humanities | Master's Theses

Between 1741, when Russians first entered the Aleutian archipelago, to 1867, when Russia sold Alaska to the United States, virtually the entire Aleutian indigenous population, the Unangan peoples, having been minimally missionized and influenced only by traders, had subsumed their ancient religious beliefs and practices into a new framework and converted to Russian Orthodox Christianity. This, despite the fact that by 1800, murder, disease and forced labor at the hands of the Russian traders were major causes of a near-extinction-level Unangan population decline of eighty percent.

This thesis will argue that, despite the injustices suffered by the Unangax at Russian ...


Indigenous People And The New England Town Meeting: Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1730-1775, Daniel R. Mandell 2019 Truman State University

Indigenous People And The New England Town Meeting: Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1730-1775, Daniel R. Mandell

Journal of Public Deliberation

In the 1730s, Mahicans along the Housatonic River settled the mission town of Stockbridge, Massachusetts. They participated in town meetings and elected "traditional" leaders to typical New England offices. Even after a growing population of English settlers began dominating town offices, the Indians remained a strong presence in meetings, which was conducted in the Mahican as well as English language, and all voting done viva voce. In 1763, a major battle when an English faction tried to take control by introducing secret balloting; the Indians complained and mostly won their case. Stockbridge thus provides a case study comparing Indian and ...


Inlp Newsletter, December 2019, Indigenous Nations Library Program 2019 University of New Mexico

Inlp Newsletter, December 2019, Indigenous Nations Library Program

Monthly Newsletters

- Academic Services Hours

  • University Libraries Spring 2019 Finals Prep and Finals

- INLP Typewriter Challenge: Poetry

  • First Place Poem - Youthful Accessibility
  • Runner-Up Poem - Consistency

- MIchael and Enokena Olson Memorial Scholarship Awardees

  • Alicia Dixon
  • Monique Kai Iron Shell

- Appreciative Farewell to Hope Johnson

- INLP End of the Year/Decade Reflection


Ciencia De Las Mujeres: Experiencias En La Cadena Textil Desde Los Ayllus De Challapata, Denise Y. Arnold, Elvira Espejo 2019 Instituto de Lengua y Cultura Aymara, La Paz, Bolivia

Ciencia De Las Mujeres: Experiencias En La Cadena Textil Desde Los Ayllus De Challapata, Denise Y. Arnold, Elvira Espejo

Textile Research Works

En el contexto de la crisis económica que atravesó Bolivia en los años ochenta, una comunidad de puna de pastores andinos, Livichuco, que forma parte integral del ayllu mayor de Qaqachaka, emprendió por iniciativa propia un proceso de mejoramiento de su producción textil, con un programa de rescate de los tintes naturales de la región. Con recursos mínimos, los comunarios compraron ollas y bateas metálicas, y comenzaron a preguntar a las personas mayores sobre sus conocimientos prácticos tradicionales en el ámbito de la tinción de textiles. Durante un período de diez años, y en coordinación con varias instituciones —incluida la ...


Decolonizing Urban Indian Institutions: Indigenous Authority In Boise, Idaho, Melanie Lee Fillmore 2019 Boise State University

Decolonizing Urban Indian Institutions: Indigenous Authority In Boise, Idaho, Melanie Lee Fillmore

Boise State University Theses and Dissertations

American Indigenous populations are underrepresented in American political science discourse. There is a lack of knowledge on public perception of political trust within Indigenous communities. I argue that contemporary discourses on data and political participation of American Indigenous people are incomplete without framing that data within the context of ongoing settler colonialism. National data shows that nearly 71% of all American Indigenous people live in urban settings. Framing American Indigenous political participation requires an in depth examination of the role of American Settler colonialism. Studies need to account for the impact of Federal government use of authority has had on ...


Guides And Guidance: Subverting Tourist Narratives In Trans-Indigenous Time And Space, Shanae Aurora Martinez 2019 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Guides And Guidance: Subverting Tourist Narratives In Trans-Indigenous Time And Space, Shanae Aurora Martinez

Theses and Dissertations

My dissertation is a study of the ways in which Indigenous writers and theorists suggest we decolonize the sites of knowledge production through our pedagogical and methodological practices. Ultimately, my dissertation is about the power of story and finding the necessary strategies to change the narratives that do harm in our daily lives. I focus on the sites of knowledge production because these are the institutions and practices with which I am the most familiar. The purpose of this work is beyond metaphorical as I strive to forefront the narratives that change the ways in which settler-Indigenous relationships are formed ...


Let's Change The Subject: Grounding Social Change In Indigenous History And Philosophy, Robert Michael Ruehl 2019 St. John Fisher College

Let's Change The Subject: Grounding Social Change In Indigenous History And Philosophy, Robert Michael Ruehl

The Seneca Falls Dialogues Journal

This article urges altering the discourse around social change. Too often it is antagonistic and negative; it also overlooks continuing colonizing practices and how injustices to Indigenous peoples have helped to shape past and current injustices toward other groups. First, the article foregrounds the religio-political ideology of the Doctrine of Christian Discovery and the boarding-school experience to remind readers about the broader criminal history of the United States toward Indigenous nations and peoples and how colonization is not a thing of the past. Any call for social change should remember this. Second, the article looks at three dimensions of Indigenous ...


Language, Indigenous Peoples, And The Right To Self-Determination, Noelle Higgins, Gerard Maguire 2019 Maynooth University, Ireland

Language, Indigenous Peoples, And The Right To Self-Determination, Noelle Higgins, Gerard Maguire

New England Journal of Public Policy

Language has always played a significant role in the colonization of peoples as an instrument of subjugation and homogenization. It has been used to control nondominant groups, including Indigenous peoples, often leading to their exclusion or assimilation. Many Indigenous groups, however, use language as a tool to connect the members of their community, to assert their group identity, and to preserve their culture. Thus, language has been used both as a means of oppression and as a mobilizer of Indigenous groups in their struggles for national recognition. Recognizing the significance of language in the identity and culture of Indigenous peoples ...


Raising Indigenous Women’S Voices For Equal Rights And Self-Determination, Grazia Redolfi, Nikoletta Pikramenou, Rosario Grimà Algora 2019 International Communities Organisation

Raising Indigenous Women’S Voices For Equal Rights And Self-Determination, Grazia Redolfi, Nikoletta Pikramenou, Rosario Grimà Algora

New England Journal of Public Policy

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples states that the right to self-determination for Indigenous peoples involves their having the right to freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social, and cultural development. The implementation of this right is linked to the ability and freedom to participate in any decision making that relates to their development. Current laws and practices are considered “unfair to women,” because they sustain traditional and customary patriarchal attitudes that marginalize Indigenous women and exclude them from decision-making tables and leadership roles. Despite the many challenges Indigenous women face in ...


Communicative Justice And Reconciliation In Canada, Alice Neeson 2019 International Communities Organisation

Communicative Justice And Reconciliation In Canada, Alice Neeson

New England Journal of Public Policy

Communicative justice co-exists with other dimensions of justice and emphasizes the importance of fair communicative practices, particularly after periods of direct or structural violence. While intercultural dialogue is often assumed to be a positive, or even necessary, part of reconciliation processes, there are questions to be asked about the ethicality of dialogue when one voice has been silenced, misrepresented, and ignored for decades. This article draws on twelve months of ethnographic research with reconciliation activists and organizations in Canada and considers the potential for communicative flows to help compensate for structural inequalities during processes of reconciliation.


Risky Times And Spaces: Settler Colonialism And Multiplying Genocide Prevention Through A Virtual Indian Residential School, Andrew Woolford, Adam Muller, Struan Sinclair 2019 University of Manitoba

Risky Times And Spaces: Settler Colonialism And Multiplying Genocide Prevention Through A Virtual Indian Residential School, Andrew Woolford, Adam Muller, Struan Sinclair

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

In this article, we examine how the logic of genocide prevention aligns with a settler colonial logic of elimination. We examine how the exclusion of cultural techniques of destruction from consideration contributes to the logic of elimination, and we suggest this is, in part, a structural problem built into the logic of genocide prevention. Along these lines, we interrogate linear and molar approaches to genocide prevention and propose, in addition to existing macro-level strategies, a molecular, everyday ethos of genocide prevention that is attuned to genocidal intimacies and seeks to foster anti-genocide habits and practices. In so doing, we argue ...


Comanche Resistance Against Colonialism, Tyler Amoy 2019 CSUSB

Comanche Resistance Against Colonialism, Tyler Amoy

History in the Making

Of all the indigenous tribes in North America, none stood stronger than the Comanche. This Great Plains tribe is considered to be one of the strongest and most warlike of the indigenous tribes and can even be compared to the Greek Spartans of old. This empire ruled for hundreds of years, overtaking and enveloping other tribes and nations in this area, however, this success would not last forever. In three steady waves, the invasions by Spain, Mexico, and the United States would crash upon this nation like a wave on the shoreline. Unlike many other native nations, the Comanche initially ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress