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The Empty Square Of The Occupation, Marcelo G. Svirsky 2010 University of Wollongong

The Empty Square Of The Occupation, Marcelo G. Svirsky

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This paper is an attempt to implement Gilles Deleuze's theory of the series and the event, and the related function of the empty square (as formulated primarily in The Logic of Sense), in relation to the geopolitical regime comprising 'Israel proper' and the system of occupation in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The purpose of this exercise is to help establish a practical access to Deleuze's philosophies, and to offer a clinical account of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories.


The International Development Institutions And Regionalism: The Case Of South-East Asia, Susan N. Engel 2010 University of Wollongong

The International Development Institutions And Regionalism: The Case Of South-East Asia, Susan N. Engel

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Why is it that the World Bank has failed to effectively incorporate theimpact of regionalisation within its economic development strategies andpolicy advice for borrowing countries? This is an interesting puzzle given theincreasing importance that scholarly observers, policy practitioners anddevelopment agencies have attached to regionalism and regionalisation inrecent years. In the fiscal years 19952005, the World Bank provided onlyUS$1.7 billion in support for regional (or multi-country) operations acrossthe globe*/this is less than 1 percent of its project and other funding overall.In South-East Asia, while the Asian Development Bank has had aparticularly strong engagement with regionalism, the World ...


Ohs In China - Work In Progress, Diana J. Kelly, Rowan Cahill 2010 University of Wollongong

Ohs In China - Work In Progress, Diana J. Kelly, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This paper explores the barriers and challenges to effective implementation of occupational health and safety regulation (OHS), and occupational exposure limits (OELs) in China in order to identify the lessons for social science scholars and activists. It finds that formal labour legislation, including occupational health and safety legislation is relatively extensive, but rarely effectively realised. This has partly been because of the pace of political and economic transformation in China. As a result, the soft infrastructure of skills and knowledge necessary for an active, effective and genuinely protective OHS system are inchoate, and often, as OHS awareness has grown, firms ...


Policing And The Responsibility To Protect In Oceania: A Preliminary Survey Of Policing Aid Programs In The 'Arc Of Responsibility', Charles M. Hawksley 2010 University of Wollongong

Policing And The Responsibility To Protect In Oceania: A Preliminary Survey Of Policing Aid Programs In The 'Arc Of Responsibility', Charles M. Hawksley

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This paper presents preliminary research about the donor aid programs that contribute to police-building in the `Arc of Responsibility' in the Pacific and Australia's `near-abroad'. It focuses on the capacity building projects that exist in Timor Leste and Solomon Islands with respect to police training. The two cases represent examples of exogenous state-building, situations in which the form and function of the state is to a great extent being dictated by outside actors. The international community provides different forms of assistance toward strengthening state capacity in the policing sector and this paper explores how police training programs and the ...


The Honbako Is Bare: What's Become Of Japan/Australia Fiction?, Alison E. Broinowski 2010 University of Wollongong

The Honbako Is Bare: What's Become Of Japan/Australia Fiction?, Alison E. Broinowski

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Complementary opportunities seemed to favour Australia and Japan at the outset. A shared modern history of 150 years might be expected to be long enough for the two antipodal countries to have seeded and cultivated their relationship, and watched it flourish, bear fruit, and multiply. Opposites could be expected to attract, empathy would be stimulated by difference, and cultural interchange should thrive spontaneously without the need for frequent applications of official fertiliser. The harvest should be plentiful, not only for government, business, education, and tourism, but for the two cultures.


E-Mail And Portfolio Assessment As Ways For Language And Culture Learning - Exchange Between Australia And Taiwan, Yu-Ju Chang, Su-Lien Chen 2010 University of Wollongong

E-Mail And Portfolio Assessment As Ways For Language And Culture Learning - Exchange Between Australia And Taiwan, Yu-Ju Chang, Su-Lien Chen

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

In Taiwan, elementary school students have started taking their formal English classes in the third grade. Besides, many students in large cities like Taipei start their formal or informal English classes at an even younger age. English learning has become a popular movement in Taiwan.


Journeys And Pilgrimages: Marion Halligan's Fictions, Dorothy L. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Journeys And Pilgrimages: Marion Halligan's Fictions, Dorothy L. Jones

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

JOURNEYS PROVIDE THE PRINCIPAL NARRATIVE STRUCTURE for literary works as diverse as the Odyssey, Gulliver's Travels and brief lyrics like Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken," whilst also symbolizing aspiration, a quest for truth, or an individual's progress from cradle to grave. Some literary journeys take the form of pilgrimages, with characters seeking enlightenment or redemption, as in John Bunyan's great allegory The Pilgrim's Progress. Journeys also feature largely in much colonial and postcolonial writing. Early colonists usually traveled great distances from their country of origin to what some hoped might prove a Promised Land ...


Reconfiguring "Asian Australian" Writing: Australia, India And Inez Baranay, Paul Sharrad 2010 University of Wollongong

Reconfiguring "Asian Australian" Writing: Australia, India And Inez Baranay, Paul Sharrad

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

In the fifty or so years of building recognition for first "migrant" and then "multicultural" writing in Australia, it is a fair generalisation to say that visible emphasis shifted from European to East and Southeast Asian voices without much mention of South Asians. Some might attribute this to an exclusionary domination of the label "Asian Australian" by one ethnic group under the influence perhaps of critical debates in the US, or they might regard such a label, whatever it means, as a neo-colonial homogenising of ethnicities and cultural differences by ongoing white hegemony (Rizvi). Without playing a blame game, one ...


Development Economics: From Classical To Critical Analysis, Susan N. Engel 2010 University of Wollongong

Development Economics: From Classical To Critical Analysis, Susan N. Engel

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

When development economics emerged as a sub-discipline of economics in the 1950s its main concern, like that of most economic theory, was (and largely remains) under-standing how the economies of nation-states have grown and expanded. This means it has been concerned with looking at the sources and kinds of economic expansion measured via increases in Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the role of different inputs into production (capital, labor, and land), the impact of growth in the various sectors of the economy (agriculture, manufacturing, and service sectors), and, to a lesser extent, the role of the state. These concerns are at ...


Sharing Music Files: Tactics Of A Challenge To The Industry, Brian Martin, Christopher L. Moore, Colin Salter 2010 University of Wollongong

Sharing Music Files: Tactics Of A Challenge To The Industry, Brian Martin, Christopher L. Moore, Colin Salter

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The sharing of music files has been the focus of a massive struggle between representatives of major record companies and artists in the music industry, on one side, and peer-to-peer (p2p) file-sharing services and their users, on the other. This struggle can be analysed in terms of tactics used by the two sides, which can be classified into five categories: cover-up versus exposure, devaluation versus validation, interpretation versus alternative interpretation, official channels versus mobilisation, and intimidation versus resistance. It is valuable to understand these tactics because similar ones are likely to be used in ongoing struggles between users of p2p ...


Cyber-Indigeneity: Urban Indigenous Identity On Facebook, Bronwyn L. Lumby 2010 University of Wollongong

Cyber-Indigeneity: Urban Indigenous Identity On Facebook, Bronwyn L. Lumby

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The indigenous use of Facebook reflects to some degree the instruments of Indigenous identity confirmation and surveillance, which operate in the "real" world of Indigenous community networks. Of interest to this article is what Michel de Certeau calls "ways of operating", that is, the uses made by consumers of various mechanisms for purposes removed from, or different to those intended by producers and the effects of these uses in maintaining vigilance or discipline on subjects who identify as Indigenous. The aim is to open up for discussion the production of these effects in cyberspace to inform a broader interest in ...


Introduction: Beyond The Royal Science Of Politics, Marcelo G. Svirsky 2010 University of Wollongong

Introduction: Beyond The Royal Science Of Politics, Marcelo G. Svirsky

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Anxieties over democracy in the post-war era, reinvigorated by philosophical nostalgia for the modern icons of civic engagement - including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill and James Madison - resulted in a flourishing industry of academic writing on political participation, especially in the English-speaking world and particularly in the field of political science. Almond and Verba's legendary The Civic Culture (1963) and Carole Pateman's Participation and Democratic Theory (1970), together with Robert Dahl's and Seymor Martin Lipset's works on democratic theory, are just a few of the most prominent names and different works that have become the pillars ...


Defining Activism, Marcelo G. Svirsky 2010 University of Wollongong

Defining Activism, Marcelo G. Svirsky

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Activism is defined in this paper as involving local instigations of new series of elements intersecting the actual, generating new collective enunciations, experimentations and investigations, which erode good and common sense and cause structures to swing away from their sedimented identities. By appealing to Spinozism, the paper describes the microphysics of the activist encounter with stable structures and the ways in which activism imposes new regimes of succession of ideas and affective variations in the power of action. Rather than understanding activism as supporting or leading social struggles, the definition of activism pursued here conceives it as an open-ended process ...


Managing Borders And Managing Bodies In Contemporary Japan, Vera Mackie 2010 University of Wollongong

Managing Borders And Managing Bodies In Contemporary Japan, Vera Mackie

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Matters of border control in twenty-first-century Japan interact with current social issues involving demography, the labour market and economic relationships with other countries in the region. Japan faces a rapidly ageing population, the highest life expectancy in the world, a birth rate well below replacement level and a shrinking population. Smaller families find it difficult to provide primary care for the sick, the elderly and those with disabilities, and the welfare system is stretched to the limit. At the same time, Japanese people are increasingly unwilling to undertake work regarded as ‘manual labour’ or ‘unskilled labour’. Thus, the management of ...


Youth Unemployment In The Illawarra Region, Scott Burrows 2010 University of Wollongong

Youth Unemployment In The Illawarra Region, Scott Burrows

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The Illawarra region of New South Wales, centred on Wollongong, Shellharbour and Kiama is characterised by coal, steel and port facilities all of which have undergone extensive ‘restructuring’ in the last two decades. As a region, the Illawarra’s economic structure has traditionally focused on the manufacturing sector but in recent years has diversified with education, information technology and tourism forming an integral part of its composition.


Are We Having A Good Time, Boys And Girls? The Need For Time And Affect Methodologies In Understanding Gendered Wellbeing, Roger Patulny 2010 University of Wollongong

Are We Having A Good Time, Boys And Girls? The Need For Time And Affect Methodologies In Understanding Gendered Wellbeing, Roger Patulny

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Calling Our Spirits Home: Indigenous Cultural Festivals And The Making Of A Good Life, Lisa Slater 2010 University of Wollongong

Calling Our Spirits Home: Indigenous Cultural Festivals And The Making Of A Good Life, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Speaking about the problems affecting Wik youth of Aurukun, Cape York, a local community health worker, Derek Walpo, lamented that ‘their spirits have wandered too far. We need to call them back’. The poignant reflection was made at a debriefing session following a social and wellbeing festival in Aurukun.1 The five‐day event culminated in a Mary G concert, in which almost all the township gathered to laugh and cheer the indomitable Broome ‘lady’. It was not just Mary G’s ribald humour that vitalised and galvanised the crowd, but also her performance that playfully reflected back and validated ...


The Raat Project: Alternatives To Using Animals In Research, Melissa J. Boyde, Denise Russell 2010 University of Wollongong

The Raat Project: Alternatives To Using Animals In Research, Melissa J. Boyde, Denise Russell

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

One of the hidden pockets of animal cruelty in Western culture is in the scientific laboratories that use animals in experiments. Currently there are about 6 million animals used in experiments each year in Australia (Singer 2009). The vision of the Replace Animals in Australian Testing (RAAT) project is to reduce the number of animals used in scientific experiments and medical research in Australia. We are developing a network of researchers and other individuals or groups interested in advocating non-animal based research and in strengthening the Australian Government/NHMRC guidelines for animal testing. In 2008 we launched the RAAT website ...


The L Word Fan Fiction Reimagining Intimate Partner Violence, Rebecca Walker 2010 University of Wollongong

The L Word Fan Fiction Reimagining Intimate Partner Violence, Rebecca Walker

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The fan fiction posted to the official and unofficial fan sites of The L Word series (Showtime 2004-2009) reimagined and repositioned the lesbian couple from the series. The couple, Bette and Tina, had been ambiguously represented as being involved in intimate partner violence in the series. The fans generally re-imagined this couple as non-violent. How intimate partner violence in lesbian relations was represented in the fan fiction in general has implications for how intimate partner violence is conceived and represented in a pluralist lesbian imaginary. The fan fiction forums, as spaces which provided collective representations of lesbians that were not ...


Narratives Of Technological Revolution In The Middle Ages, Adam Robert Lucas 2010 University of Wollongong

Narratives Of Technological Revolution In The Middle Ages, Adam Robert Lucas

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Narratives of technological revolution in the Middle Ages are a distinctively 20th-century phenomenon. First articulated by a handful of influential French, British and American historians between the 1930s and 1950s, they can be genealogically linked to narratives of progress across a number of arts and social science disciplines which have invoked the language of revolutionary rupture to characterize a number of notable transformations in human cultures and societies between the Neolithic and modern periods.

Two kinds of technological revolution have been claimed for the European Middle Ages by 20th-century scholars: an ‘agricultural revolution’ of the 6th to 9th centuries, and ...


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