Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

343,385 Full-Text Articles 177,920 Authors 71,922,677 Downloads 439 Institutions

All Articles in Arts and Humanities

Faceted Search

343,385 full-text articles. Page 7045 of 7729.

Comics And Conflict: War And Patriotically Themed Comics In American Cultural History From World War Ii Through The Iraq War, Cord A. Scott 2011 Loyola University Chicago

Comics And Conflict: War And Patriotically Themed Comics In American Cultural History From World War Ii Through The Iraq War, Cord A. Scott

Dissertations

Illustration has been an integral part of human history. Particularly before the advent of media such as photography, film, television, and now the Internet, illustrations in all their variety have been the primary visual way to convey history. The comic book, which emerged in its modern form in the 1930s, was another form of visual entertainment that gave readers, especially children, a form of escape.

As World War II began, however, comic books became an integral part of war propaganda as well providing information and education for both children and adults. This dissertation looks at how specific comic books of ...


Abstention To Consumption: The Development Of American Vegetarianism, 1817-1917, Adam Daniel Shprintzen 2011 Loyola University Chicago

Abstention To Consumption: The Development Of American Vegetarianism, 1817-1917, Adam Daniel Shprintzen

Dissertations

The history of vegetarianism in the United States has long been shrouded in myth, assumption and obfuscation. Vegetarianism as a vital ideological and political movement has often been presented--even by its proponents--as a product of twentieth century modernism, reflecting a rise in ethical consumer awareness. The historical record of the nineteenth century, however, tells a very different story. The notion that dietary choices could be connected with larger social and political goals was formulated during, and changed dramatically in the nineteenth century. This dissertation charts the rise and evolution of vegetarianism in the United States from 1817 until 1917.

This ...


Doing History In The Adirondacks: Interpreting The Park, The People, And The Landscape, Maria F. Reynolds 2011 Loyola University Chicago

Doing History In The Adirondacks: Interpreting The Park, The People, And The Landscape, Maria F. Reynolds

Dissertations

Occupying a large portion of Northern New York State, the Adirondack Park includes six million acres of public and private land that compromise over 85 % of all wilderness lands east of the Mississippi. Unique in many ways, the Adirondack Park remains a model for sustainable living and wilderness land management. This dissertation explores the way history is used to both complicate and enrich the relationship between humans and nature in the Adirondack Park. By analyzing historic preservation, cultural landscape management, material culture, and museums this project examines the way that Park history has been told through exhibits, public programs, tours ...


A Diachronic Analysis Of The Use Of Scripture In The Variant Versions Of The Apocryphon Of John, David Creech 2011 Loyola University Chicago

A Diachronic Analysis Of The Use Of Scripture In The Variant Versions Of The Apocryphon Of John, David Creech

Dissertations

This dissertation explores at length the Apocryphon of John's ambivalent treatment of the Jewish and Christian scriptures. Although Moses is explicitly corrected at five points in the text--four times mentioned by name (NHC II 13,18-21; 22,22-25; 23,3-4; and 29,6-10) and one time by inference (NHC II 21,9-14)--the Genesis account of creation is nonetheless the basis for the Apocryphon's cosmogony and anthropogony. It is argued that the Apocryphon's uneven treatment of the Bible is the result of a development of the text in the midst of a dispute with other early catholics.


Kant Crisis, William H. Carter 2011 Iowa State University

Kant Crisis, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

This study approaches the last days of Immanuel Kant through the lens of his contemporary biographers and other correspondents. Among the latter, Kant’s brother and, subsequently, his brother’s family provide a symptomatic reflection upon Kant’s management of his genealogy and his legacy. Yet behind this body of work is another corpus, one which embodies maternal and paternal legacies that are not readily subsumed by Oedipus or Kant’s philosophy. This work (of art) is Kant’s own body or corpus, which he painstakingly maintained and which provided a case study for his refelctions on preventive medicine in ...


The Seduction Of Feminist Theory, Erin Amann Holliday-Karre 2011 Loyola University Chicago

The Seduction Of Feminist Theory, Erin Amann Holliday-Karre

Dissertations

My dissertation, "The Seduction of Feminist Theory," comes out of my research on South African fiction and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and focuses broadly on feminist theory and the question of female power. Traditionally feminist theory has sought to empower women by insisting on their equality to men and by allowing their voices to be heard. But in trying to understand why women did not speak about their personal victimization at the TRC hearings, and why so many women characters in South African fiction are unable or unwilling to speak, I have come to see that women do not ...


Tools Of Horror: Servants In Gothic Novel, Jacob Herrmann 2011 South Dakota State University

Tools Of Horror: Servants In Gothic Novel, Jacob Herrmann

The Journal of Undergraduate Research

The servants within 18th- and 19th-century English literature play an undoubtedly vital role within everyday life. Elizabeth Langland highlights this point in her discussion of the middle class: “Running the middle-class household, which by definition included at least one servant, was an exercise in class management, a process both inscribed and revealed in the Victorian novel” (291). In Victorian England, especially, class and rank were everything. While during the Romantic period servants were common, rising concerns for their role in the household becomes more apparent during the Victorian Era. Gothic novelists take their concerns for these domestic issues and use ...


Stratified Boston: The Brahmins, The Irish And The Boston Police Strike Of 1919, Sarah Block 2011 Bucknell University

Stratified Boston: The Brahmins, The Irish And The Boston Police Strike Of 1919, Sarah Block

Honors Theses

This thesis explores the Boston Police Strike of 1919 through the lens of class struggle and ethnic tension. Through an examination of the development of Boston’s class structure, particularly focused on the upper class Brahmins and the Irish working class, it concludes that the Brahmins’ success in suppressing the police strikeallowed for their maintenance of socioeconomic power within the city despite their relatively small population. Based on their extreme class cohesion resulting from the growing prominence of Harvard University as well as the Brahmins’ unabashed discrimination against their ethnic neighbors in almost every sphere of society, theBrahmins were able ...


Mcmac, Cheryl, Debbie Frost, Cheryl McMac 2011 Kenyon College

Mcmac, Cheryl, Debbie Frost, Cheryl Mcmac

Video Collection

No abstract provided.


Amnesia, Lover, Christine Stewart-Nunez 2011 South Dakota State University

Amnesia, Lover, Christine Stewart-Nunez

English Faculty Publications

This poem appeared in Paddlefish No.5 (2011).


My Language Of Love Is Not Polish, Christine Stewart-Nunez 2011 South Dakota State University

My Language Of Love Is Not Polish, Christine Stewart-Nunez

English Faculty Publications

This poem appeared in Paddlefish No.5 (2011).


Introduction, Dale Kinney 2011 Bryn Mawr College

Introduction, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney 2011 Bryn Mawr College

The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Universal Jurisdiction And The Enforcement Of Human Rights, Ralph Gustav Steinhardt 2011 University of Redlands

Universal Jurisdiction And The Enforcement Of Human Rights, Ralph Gustav Steinhardt

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper will first examine the question of national sovereignty and the protections of states against international intervention. After arguing for the use of act-based over systemic criteria, I will move to the next step in the discussion and ask what sort of act-based criteria are best to use. What sort of acts should we identify as those that compromise the sovereignty of states in which they are committed? Or, to put it differently, what universal rights are to be protected coercively (by military intervention or something similar)? Third, by examining some current policies, I will show that there are ...


Death's Laughter (Novel) And Crafting A Novel (Exegesis), Fémi A. Adédínà 2011 Edith Cowan University

Death's Laughter (Novel) And Crafting A Novel (Exegesis), Fémi A. Adédínà

Theses: Doctorates and Masters

This thesis consists of a creative component, a novel, Death’s laughter and an exegetical essay, Crafting a novel. The novel centres on a true Nigerian story: a Pentecostal pastor, who died in a plane crash, was a government official found out to have amassed large sums of money and assets that were far greater than could be accrued from his modest salary. In addition, he was accused of bigamy because he had two wives who did not know each other in two different cities within the country. This basic story serves as the nucleus of the novel. The novel ...


Nature, Domestic Labor, And Moral Community In Susan Fenimore Cooper's Rural Hours And Elinor Wyllys, Richard M. Magee 2011 Sacred Heart University

Nature, Domestic Labor, And Moral Community In Susan Fenimore Cooper's Rural Hours And Elinor Wyllys, Richard M. Magee

English Faculty Publications

Cooper's argument for a domestic ideal situated within a rural setting reinforces the importance of community connections through a shared sense of morality, as well as understanding of the natural world. Community alone—the human connections—never seems to be enough in Cooper's formulation, but must always exist with an awareness of the world outside the narrow confines of one's own domestic sphere. Concern for one's fellow-beings necessitates a concern for the world in which these beings live, and Cooper understands that when any bonds are broken—such as the bonds that connect us to the ...


"I Had Never Before ... Heard Of Him At All": William Gilmore Simms, The Elusive William North, And A Lost Simms Novel About American Authorship, Patrick G. Scott 2011 University of South Carolina - Columbia

"I Had Never Before ... Heard Of Him At All": William Gilmore Simms, The Elusive William North, And A Lost Simms Novel About American Authorship, Patrick G. Scott

Faculty Publications

Examines a review by the antebellum Southern novelist William Gilmore Simms of a new book by the English writer William North (1825-1854), North's posthumous novel The Slave of the Lamp (1855), discusses possible reasons for Simms's hostility to North such as North's links to the New York Bohemians and his anti-professionalism, and explores what the review reveals about a now-lost Simms novel, with the same title, that gave a different perspective on mid-19th century changes in the conditions and profession of authorship in America.


Generic Issues In Teaching Anthologies: Simms And The Example Of Walter Scott, Patrick G. Scott 2011 University of South Carolina - Columbia

Generic Issues In Teaching Anthologies: Simms And The Example Of Walter Scott, Patrick G. Scott

Faculty Publications

Part of a symposium discussing the neglect of William Gilmore Simms in college-level English courses. Charts the relative neglect, and recent return, of Walter Scott's work in successive editions of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. Proposes that the inclusion of an author in the teaching canon for college literature courses depends not only on literary or ideological criteria, but also on the author writing characteristic material in a classroom-friendly genre such as the short story, essay, or short poem.


The Highest Good And The Best Activity: Aristotle On The Well-Lived Life, Philip William Bauchan 2011 Loyola University Chicago

The Highest Good And The Best Activity: Aristotle On The Well-Lived Life, Philip William Bauchan

Master's Theses

The question of how Aristotle characterizes eudaimonia, or living-well, in the Nicomachean Ethics has long been a contentious issue amongst Aristotelian scholars. The secondary literature has been roughly divided between inclusivist readers, who argue that Aristotle designates both theoria, or contemplation, and the practical virtues, and exclusivist readers, who argue that Aristotle singles out theoria alone. This thesis seeks to forge a middle ground between these two perspectives by focusing on the central claim of Book I that the eudaimonia is virtuous activity. Reading Book X in light of Book I's claim then allows one to show that both ...


Being In The Know: Punk, Confrontation, And The Process Of Validating Truth Claims, Christopher Richard Penna 2011 Loyola University Chicago

Being In The Know: Punk, Confrontation, And The Process Of Validating Truth Claims, Christopher Richard Penna

Master's Theses

Since the birth of punk, it has been a harbinger of trends within both youth culture and what cultural theorist Theodor Adorno calls the "culture industry" (Adorno & Horkheimer, 1947; Adorno, 1971). However, punk has never been fully embraced by the culture industry, largely, by design. Punk arose as a response, borne out of the frustration of a stagnant world that values profit over people (Sabin, 1999, p. 3). Present within opposition is confrontation--which is the very nature of punk. This thesis seeks to exemplify how punk uses confrontation as the instrument through which punk comes to know truths. The matrix by which ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress