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Review Of Indian Tribes Of Oklahoma: A Guide By Blue Clark, Ron McCoy 2010 Oklahoma State University

Review Of Indian Tribes Of Oklahoma: A Guide By Blue Clark, Ron Mccoy

Great Plains Quarterly

Oklahoma's license plates, which formerly displayed an Osage shield, now depict a representation of Native son Allan Houser's evocative sculpture of a fellow Apache preparing to fire an arrow at the sky. The legend running across the bottom of the plate reads: "Native America." This is an apt statement about Oklahoma, site of pre-Columbian Indian settlements, westernmost extension of Mississippian mound building cultures, home for Kiowa and Comanche buffalo hunters, and adopted land of Cherokees and others forced to abandon familiar stomping grounds east of the Mississippi River. On a per capita basis, Oklahoma boasts the nation's ...


Review Of The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story By Elliott West, Dennis Baird 2010 University of Idaho Library

Review Of The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story By Elliott West, Dennis Baird

Great Plains Quarterly

The Nez Perce people (who call themselves Nimiipuu) are ancient inhabitants of Idaho's Clearwater Valley and of the Wallowa Mountains of eastern Oregon. Driven by both curiosity and economics, they have a rich history of travels to distant places, including California, the Rio Grande Valley, and across the Plains to Missouri. Buffalo drew large segments of the tribe to the Great Plains, where many leaders where born. They have an equally rich history of generosity to visitors, a category that included Lewis and Clark, fur traders and missionaries, and eventually the miners and settlers who helped various federal officials ...


Review Of Reopening The Frontier: Homesteading In The Modern West By Brian Q. Cannon, Benjamin T. Arrington 2010 National Park Service

Review Of Reopening The Frontier: Homesteading In The Modern West By Brian Q. Cannon, Benjamin T. Arrington

Great Plains Quarterly

Brian Q. Cannon has established himself as one of America's preeminent historians of agriculture and the modern West. Reopening the Frontier will only add to this well-deserved reputation. In it, he examines the rejuvenation of western homesteading- the idea of the federal government providing cost-free land to settlers willing to live on and cultivate it-after World War II. As Cannon demonstrates, the challenges of homesteading in 1950s Washington or Oregon were often just as severe as those of trying to "prove up" a claim in 1870s Nebraska or Kansas.


On The Road Again Consumptives Traveling For Health In The American West, 1840-1925, Jeanne Abrams 2010 University of Denver

On The Road Again Consumptives Traveling For Health In The American West, 1840-1925, Jeanne Abrams

Great Plains Quarterly

From the mid-nineteenth century through the first decades of the twentieth century, hundreds of thousands of health seekers, on the advice of their physicians, family members, or popular advertisements, took to the road to "chase the cure" for tuberculosis, the most dreaded disease of the era. Indeed, tuberculosis, also commonly known as consumption or "the White Plague," held the dubious distinction of being the leading cause of death in nineteenth century America. In the first years of the twentieth century 150,000 Americans died of it yearly, and more than ten times that number were afflicted with the disease.1 ...


Following The Light, Keri Suarez 2010 Andrews University

Following The Light, Keri Suarez

Lake Union Herald

No abstract provided.


A Full Experience, Vi kram Panchal 2010 Andrews University

A Full Experience, Vi Kram Panchal

Lake Union Herald

No abstract provided.


Did You Make That? : Wood Carving, Apprenticeships, And Collective Art In Senegal, Christina Schueler 2010 SIT Study Abroad

Did You Make That? : Wood Carving, Apprenticeships, And Collective Art In Senegal, Christina Schueler

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Defining the term “artist” in one’s own culture is challenging and can be even more difficult in a foreign culture. In Senegal, the practice of wood sculpture can be both artistic and practical. Because of this, Senegalese artists who work with wood sculpture end up asserting their identity as artists through their collective actions. In this study, I follow the life and craft of a Senegalese wood sculptor, Serigne Mor Gueye, by making my own sculptures and listening to his anecdotes about life as an artist in hopes of discovering how the Senegalese define such ambiguous terms, “art” and ...


Profiles Of Youth, Amy Michelle Hahn 2010 Andrews University

Profiles Of Youth, Amy Michelle Hahn

Lake Union Herald

No abstract provided.


Ellen Tupper, Tammy Horn 2010 Eastern Kentucky University

Ellen Tupper, Tammy Horn

Tammy Horn

No abstract provided.


Mercy, Allison Schuette 2010 Valparaiso University

Mercy, Allison Schuette

Allison Schuette

No abstract provided.


Response 1 To 'Jesse James: From Hero To Villain In The Eyes Of One' By Amanda Sheridan, Thomas Burkdall 2010 Occidental College

Response 1 To 'Jesse James: From Hero To Villain In The Eyes Of One' By Amanda Sheridan, Thomas Burkdall

Thomas Burkdall

No abstract provided.


Monster Mash, Meredith Doench 2010 University of Dayton

Monster Mash, Meredith Doench

Meredith Doench

No abstract provided.


The Beauvais Sacramentary In The Getty Museum As A "Coronation Sacramentary", Elizabeth Teviotdale 2010 Western Michigan University

The Beauvais Sacramentary In The Getty Museum As A "Coronation Sacramentary", Elizabeth Teviotdale

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

Reexamines the evidence--paleographical, art historical, and circumstantial--that Carl Nordenfalk (1907-92) adduced for his hypothesis that Los Angeles, J. Paul Getty Museum, MS Ludwig V 1 (the ten surviving leaves of a sacramentary written and illuminated around the year 1000) was created for the occasion of the consecration in 1017 of Robert the Pious’s ten-year-old son Hugh as his co-ruler. In putting forward this hypothesis, Nordenfalk was building on a suggestion he made first in 1950 that the manuscript was written and illuminated at the behest of Robert the Pious by a Lombard artist named Nivardus, who was working at ...


And Will He Perish: Melville's Whale, H. Rice 2010 Kennesaw State University

And Will He Perish: Melville's Whale, H. Rice

H. William Rice

No abstract provided.


Online Searching And Collecting Resources In Music Research, Mahn-Hee Kang 2010 University of South Florida

Online Searching And Collecting Resources In Music Research, Mahn-Hee Kang

Mahn-Hee Kang

No abstract provided.


The Phenomenal Present, Charlene Elsby 2010 Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne

The Phenomenal Present, Charlene Elsby

Charlene Elsby

No abstract provided.


Banquet Brutality And Medical Malice In La Condamnation De Banquet, Timothy Tomasik 2010 Valparaiso University

Banquet Brutality And Medical Malice In La Condamnation De Banquet, Timothy Tomasik

Timothy J. Tomasik

No abstract provided.


Fallen, Allison Schuette 2010 Valparaiso University

Fallen, Allison Schuette

Allison Schuette

No abstract provided.


Acafandom And Beyond (Part Ii) On Confessions Of An Aca-Fan: The Official Weblog Of Henry Jenkins, Suzanne Scott 2010 Occidental College

Acafandom And Beyond (Part Ii) On Confessions Of An Aca-Fan: The Official Weblog Of Henry Jenkins, Suzanne Scott

Suzanne Scott

The Official Weblog of Henry Jenkins, Guest Blogger with Will Brooker, Melissa A. Click, and Sangita Shresthova


American Urban History: A Living Canon. Or Is Anyone Listening?, Steven Corey 2010 Columbia College Chicago

American Urban History: A Living Canon. Or Is Anyone Listening?, Steven Corey

Steven H. Corey

No abstract provided.


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