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Duties And Rights, Martha McClellan Brown 2020 Wright State University

Duties And Rights, Martha Mcclellan Brown

Martha McClellan Brown Speeches

Martha McClellan Brown outlines her thoughts on the nature of rights and duties, the notion of moral development and the progress of democracy.


Constitution And By-Laws Of The Twentieth Century Club, Twentieth Century Club 2020 Wright State University

Constitution And By-Laws Of The Twentieth Century Club, Twentieth Century Club

Martha McClellan Brown Ephemera

The Constitution and By-Laws of the Twentieth Century Club of Cincinnati, Ohio.


An Incident With Its Sequel (2), William Kennedy Brown 2020 Wright State University

An Incident With Its Sequel (2), William Kennedy Brown

William Kennedy Brown Papers

William Kennedy Brown describes an 1869 meeting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton wanted to convince Martha McClellan Brown, who was in New York at the time, to join her in advocating for women’s suffrage. William Kennedy Brown argued that by aligning herself with Cady Stanton she would damage her reputation among evangelical women. He felt that his wife would more effectively advance the cause of suffrage by continuing her efforts to organize the Women’s Christian Temperance Union.


Powers Of Frances Willard, William Kennedy Brown 2020 Wright State University

Powers Of Frances Willard, William Kennedy Brown

William Kennedy Brown Papers

William Kennedy Brown discusses a review of the work of Frances Willard, an educator and member of the temperance and women’s suffrage movements, that appeared in the Philadelphia Press. Brown compares the leadership styles of three women in the suffrage movement to those of three contemporary men, saying that the followers of Willard and General George McClellan were inspired by loyalty, the followers of Mary Livermore and Ulysses Grant by an intellectual decision, and the followers of Susan B. Anthony and Abraham Lincoln by the heroic nature of their lives.


The Temperance Movement And Women’S Suffrage, William Kennedy Brown 2020 Wright State University

The Temperance Movement And Women’S Suffrage, William Kennedy Brown

William Kennedy Brown Papers

William Kennedy Brown describes Martha McClellan Brown’s initial attempts to organize the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the subsequent founding and growth of that organization. He argues that the history of women’s suffrage is defined more by the Christian women of the temperance movement and their demand for the vote than by the work of religious skeptics such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton.


Benevolent Women And An Orphan Asylum: The Case Of Rochester, New York, Joseph Resch 2020 CUNY Hunter College

Benevolent Women And An Orphan Asylum: The Case Of Rochester, New York, Joseph Resch

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

Rochester, New York typified the rapid growth towns were experiencing in the early 19th century. Benevolent women established charitable societies and institutions like the Orphan Asylum to combat the social ills brought on by that growth. Their humanitarian endeavors laid the foundation for today’s child welfare agencies.


Ua1c11/105 Phi Mu Photo Collection, WKU Archives 2020 Western Kentucky University

Ua1c11/105 Phi Mu Photo Collection, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Collection Inventories

Photographs created by and about Phi Mu sorority.


A Girl's Song: Recounting Women And The Nantucket Whaling Industry, 1750-1890, Natalie Mitchell 2020 The University of Akron

A Girl's Song: Recounting Women And The Nantucket Whaling Industry, 1750-1890, Natalie Mitchell

Williams Honors College, Honors Research Projects

In this honors research project, I intend to explore the effect of the whaling industry on women who lived in the community on the island of Nantucket, as well as how they affected the industry. The period I will focus on is the end of the 18th century through the middle of the 19th century, because this was the height of the whaling industry in the United States and during the majority of this time span Nantucket was home to the most active American whaling port, making it advantageous to examine the island’s community for my research ...


Progress And Patriarchy: Female Students At The University Of Montana, 1918-1922, Natalie D. Mongeau 2020 University of Montana, Missoula

Progress And Patriarchy: Female Students At The University Of Montana, 1918-1922, Natalie D. Mongeau

Undergraduate Theses, Professional Papers, and Capstone Artifacts

Physical Education student Lillian Christensen embodied the reality female students faced while pursuing higher education at the University of Montana in the 1920s. Known as “co-eds,” women were expected to be more than just successful in academics. Coeds were expected to pursue women-acceptable majors, attend clubs, organize events, and participate in the campus traditions that all reinforced gender standards. Essentially, the ideal coed was expected to succeed at everything while their academic achievements were seen only as a path to their ultimate role of wife and mother. Even while women were achieving significant victories for women's rights in the ...


Equitable Hiring Policy In Higher Education At The University Of Montana, Victoria McKinley Bigelow, Kinsey Anderson 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Equitable Hiring Policy In Higher Education At The University Of Montana, Victoria Mckinley Bigelow, Kinsey Anderson

Graduate Student Portfolios, Papers, and Capstone Projects

Higher Education; University of Montana; Equity; Hiring; University; College; Montana; Missoula; Public Administration; Organization; Missoula; Diversity; Women; Policy


Nothing Comes To Her Who Sits And Waits: The League Of Women Voters And Citizenship After Woman Suffrage, 1920-1940, Emily Lefeber 2020 University of Iowa

Nothing Comes To Her Who Sits And Waits: The League Of Women Voters And Citizenship After Woman Suffrage, 1920-1940, Emily Lefeber

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

Rather than viewing the Nineteenth Amendment as an endpoint of the woman suffrage movement, this amendment should instead be viewed as a stop along the way. No one piece of legislation guaranteed all women the right to vote, nor did the Nineteenth Amendment grant women equal citizenship status with men. Founded in 1919, the League of Women Voters of Iowa became the successor of the Iowa Equal Suffrage Association, carrying on a legacy of activism and resistance to gender-based discrimination. While the right to vote made up a large part of what most suffragists thought of as citizenship, many women ...


Building From Within: How Two Female Prisoners Survived Incarceration, Laura M. Cuevas Meléndez 2020 University of Kentucky

Building From Within: How Two Female Prisoners Survived Incarceration, Laura M. Cuevas Meléndez

Special Collections Research Center Learning Lab Student Research

According to the US Commission of Civil Rights, from 1980 to 2016, the percentage of imprisoned women surpassed 730% (4). Severe isolation, lack of sunlight, and sensory deprivation tactics were employed during the 1980s, when Silvia Baraldini and Laura Whitehorn were incarcerated at the federal women’s prison in Lexington, Kentucky. Both women maintained their basic humanity and spirit by creating educational opportunities for fellow inmates, advocating for improved conditions, and sharing their experiences through letter writing. They each wrote hundreds of letters to friends, family, and other social activists concerned with their plight. Using a collection of letters written ...


Renaissance Woman: Gwendolyn Bennett, Eva Cunningham-Firkey, Kennesha Kelly-Davis, Janelle Soash, Faith Swarner 2020 Messiah University

Renaissance Woman: Gwendolyn Bennett, Eva Cunningham-Firkey, Kennesha Kelly-Davis, Janelle Soash, Faith Swarner

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

While she was still an undergraduate, Bennett established her reputation as a poet when her poem “Nocturne” was published in The Crisis (the journal of the NAACP), and her poem “Heritage” was published in Opportunity (a magazine published by National Urban League). Just a year later, Bennett read “To Usward, ” her tribute to novelist Jesse Fauset, at ...


Disrupting An(Other): Sexuality As Political Resistance, Emma C. Downey 2020 Bucknell University

Disrupting An(Other): Sexuality As Political Resistance, Emma C. Downey

Master’s Theses

If sexual knowledge can threaten social and political institutions and their control, how do the contents and subjects of literature and publications in the interwar period make that legible? Moreover, if female sexuality–represented or real–was seen as something disruptive to the normal functioning of society, did sexuality offer a useful entry point for social, political, or ideological critiques of the interwar period? My project responds to these questions by analyzing the lives and writings of two female authors of the interwar period: Djuna Barnes (1892-1982) and Katharine Burdekin (1896-1963). In my analysis, I focus on two major points ...


Conductor Of The Old Eighth: Harriet M. Marshall, Ian McIlrath, David Ford, Josh Acevedo 2020 Messiah University

Conductor Of The Old Eighth: Harriet M. Marshall, Ian Mcilrath, David Ford, Josh Acevedo

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

Harriet McClintock Marshall was born in 1840. Her mother, Catherine, was one of the founding members of Wesley Union African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, and Harriet worked with her mother to continue establishing the church's reputation. Wesley Union, located on Tanner's Alley, was a haven for those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad. Harriet's ...


Musician And Church Leader: Hannah Braxton Jones, Isis Ortiz-Scarlett, Max Weaver, Jarod Fry 2020 Messiah University

Musician And Church Leader: Hannah Braxton Jones, Isis Ortiz-Scarlett, Max Weaver, Jarod Fry

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

Hannah's leadership and administrative skills extended beyond the church to civic organizations such as the House of Ruth, Good Samaritans, and Daughters of Samaritans. In addition, she was a dedicated music teacher. She did all of this while providing for her family by working as a domestic, one of the few jobs available to African-American women ...


Rhythms Of Resilience In The Eighth: From Abolition To Suffrage, Jean Corey, Katie Wingert 2020 Messiah University

Rhythms Of Resilience In The Eighth: From Abolition To Suffrage, Jean Corey, Katie Wingert

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

This exhibit seeks to honor the spirit of perseverance and resilience demonstrated by many individuals who fought for their rights and contributed positively to the community of the Old Eighth, Dauphin County, and beyond. In this year, we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the 15th Amendment and the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. 2020 is also ...


Ardent Activist: Anne E. Amos, Anna Strange, Michaela Magners 2020 Messiah University

Ardent Activist: Anne E. Amos, Anna Strange, Michaela Magners

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

Amos was involved in the temperance movement in Harrisburg. As a founding member of the Independent Order of Daughters of Temperance, she served as the Grand Recording Scribe and District Grand Deputy of the Good Samaritan Council, no. 1. The Council listed under her address on South Avenue functioned as a political hub in the Eighth Ward ...


The Political Pen: Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Kate Kuc, Melissa Boyer, Chloe Dickson 2020 Messiah University

The Political Pen: Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Kate Kuc, Melissa Boyer, Chloe Dickson

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

In 1895, Alice Dunbar-Nelson published her first collection of short stories and poems, Violets and Other Tales. She also published a few plays, such as Mine Eyes Have Seen (1918) in The Crisis, the official magazine of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People. Dunbar-Nelson often used her creative works to address racism and limitations ...


Abolitionist Aunty: Jane Chester, Christopher Mundis, Katie Heiser 2020 Messiah University

Abolitionist Aunty: Jane Chester, Christopher Mundis, Katie Heiser

Women of the Eighth Ward

Presented on Friday, February 21 as part of Messiah College’s 2020 Humanities Symposium. This exhibit, “Vulnerabilities & Securities in Historic Harrisburg: From Abolition to Suffrage,” was produced by the Center for Public Humanities Student Fellows and Dr. Sarah Myers’s Public History Class.

Jane Morris Chester was born enslaved in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 5, 1801. Around 1828, she escaped enslavement and made a treacherous journey north to Harrisburg, where she married George Chester. After George’s death in 1859, Jane, fondly called “Aunty” by Harrisburg citizens, continued to operate the restaurant and opened a premier catering business for Harrisburg ...


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