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Helm Family Papers (Mss 633), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Helm Family Papers (Mss 633), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscript Collection 633. Correspondence, business papers, deeds, and miscellaneous records of the Helm family of Butler County, Kentucky, and related families.


Texas In The Southwestern Fur Trade, 1718-1840., J. Ryan Badger 2018 Utah State University

Texas In The Southwestern Fur Trade, 1718-1840., J. Ryan Badger

All Graduate Plan B and other Reports

Much has been written about the North American trade dealing in beaver and otter pelts. The drive to acquire valuable hides drove the early colonial economy and served as one of the industries which pushed Americans to expand their national reach beyond the Rocky Mountains, the British, Scots, and Russians to move southward from Canada and Alaska, and the Spanish to assert their claim to the North. Admittedly, the Spanish were latecomers to the fur trade and often lacked the population and practical experience to pursue trapping as a nationalized industry, however, the portion of North America they laid claim ...


Chapin, Margaret (Terwillinger) (Sc 3239), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Chapin, Margaret (Terwillinger) (Sc 3239), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection SC 3239. Letter, dated November 16, 1862, by Margaret T. Chapin, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, to her husband, David S. Chapin, at Camp Despair in Kentucky. Margaret copies a section of a song from a hymnbook. David S. Chapin writes back to Margaret, on the other side of the paper, dated December 22, 1862, from Camp Despair. He writes that Margaret would receive his pension if he dies. He tells her that she would earn $96 a year, or $11 a month. He reminds her to send stamps in her next letter, he ...


Trouble's Clarion Call For Leaders: Jo Ann Robinson And The Montgomery Bus Boycott, Rita White Carver 2018 University of Phoenix, School of Advanced Studies

Trouble's Clarion Call For Leaders: Jo Ann Robinson And The Montgomery Bus Boycott, Rita White Carver

The Journal of Values-Based Leadership

Turbulent times are part of the human experience. They provide what Useem calls the "leadership moment" when one is given the opportunity to define who one is (1998). For Jo Ann Robinson, that leadership moment came personally in 1949, and publicly in 1955 when she transformed her trauma into a pro-social action of change (Williams and Allen, 2015). This article is a historical narrative inquiry into the life of Robinson who launched the Montgomery boycott and helped start the civil rights movement. The article tells the rest of the story beyond Parks and King, and explores the question: How did ...


The Rise Of Political Factions In The United States: 1789–1795, William Wehrs 2018 Ursinus College

The Rise Of Political Factions In The United States: 1789–1795, William Wehrs

History Summer Fellows

Organized factions were something that did not arise with the creation of the United States. Rather, they slowly emerged during George Washington’s presidency. Initially, the Founding Fathers were highly resistant to the idea. There was resistance to political parties partly because of their association with the perceived dysfunctionality of England, and also because major influential thinkers like John Trenchard or David Hume were strongly against them. Soon, however, conflicts began to emerge. These stemmed from the conflicting views the Founding Fathers had on human nature. While Hamilton and Adams were both highly dubious about the trustworthiness of the common ...


Moderate Resistance In "A Call For Unity": A Historical Perspective On Martin Luther King Jr.’S Prison Epistle, Noah D. Moore 2018 Minnesota State University, Mankato

Moderate Resistance In "A Call For Unity": A Historical Perspective On Martin Luther King Jr.’S Prison Epistle, Noah D. Moore

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

In April of 1963, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote a defense of non-violent direct action that students across the country read today. His "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" stands as the pinnacle of civil rights literature, but most people do not realize that it was more than a rhetorical device used to support his cause. Dr. King's letter was in fact a response to different letter, published in the Birmingham News by eight prominent, white clergymen on April 13, 1963. Their letter, "A Call for Unity," urged blacks to end the civil rights demonstrations in Birmingham ...


Morgan, William Montrose, 1842-1926 (Sc 3231), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Morgan, William Montrose, 1842-1926 (Sc 3231), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3231. Letter, February 2, 1862, of William Montrose Morgan to his parents and sisters, of Wisconsin. From Camp Wood, Kentucky, he writes of the rainy and snowy weather; the number of soldiers sick in company regiments; he describes his regiment and his brigade commander as being the best in the division. He comments about the regiment being on guard duty and held in reserve to protect a bridge and ferry on Green River. The letter describes that there are 20,000 men in his regiment under General Negley; Union materials were being transported ...


Kibbee, Amos Watson, 1828-1915 (Sc 3230), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Kibbee, Amos Watson, 1828-1915 (Sc 3230), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3230. Letter, 26 January 1862, of Amos Watson Kibbee to his cousin, Hattie Tuttle, of Painesville, Ohio. From Camp Barker in Cairo, Illinois, he writes about camp life and rumors of possible cavalry soldiers being discharged and his experiences of late-night scouting duties. He also describes being in an advance guard with other soldiers, taking the town of Blandville, Kentucky, and arresting suspicious civilians. He writes about guarding a prisoner of war, and his change of religious views. Includes an Illinois Union envelope.


A Select List Of Books In Mexican-American History (2018 Update), John R. Chavez 2018 Southern Methodist University

A Select List Of Books In Mexican-American History (2018 Update), John R. Chavez

History Faculty Publications

This list of secondary sources includes surveys and monographs, but few collections or biographies; while some works may overlap disciplines, their content is historical on the whole and focused significantly on ethnic Mexicans in the United States.


Mcleod, Ann Sara (Prosser), 1910-2003 (Mss 642), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Mcleod, Ann Sara (Prosser), 1910-2003 (Mss 642), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 642. Two diaries and a chronology kept by Ann Sara (Prosser) McLeod, of Jackson, Mississippi. McLeod discusses daily happening, social events, club news, and comments about emotional and physical health issues. Occasionally she mentions things happening at a national level, such as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the funeral of John F. Kennedy.


Albion Native Illustrated Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, Matthew R. Ballard 2018 Orleans County Department of History

Albion Native Illustrated Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, Matthew R. Ballard

Pioneer Record

Henry Lyon Porter, a native of Albion, studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts before starting his own commercial art business in Buffalo. He later attended the New York School for Walt Disney Animators, graduating in 1936 and eventually participating in the illustration of Disney's first full-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.


Built Ford Tough: Masculinity, Gerald Ford's Presidential Museum, And The Macho Presidential Style, Dustin Jones 2018 University of Windsor

Built Ford Tough: Masculinity, Gerald Ford's Presidential Museum, And The Macho Presidential Style, Dustin Jones

Major Papers

In Cold War America, spanning roughly from 1945-1991, masculinity was in crisis. The rise of Communism and the Soviet Union had led to a fear of spies, infiltrators, and defectors known most commonly as the Red Scare. Americans were encouraged to be hyper vigilant in sussing out deviant behaviour. Alongside this scare came the Lavender Scare. It was suggested that homosexuals were deviant peoples and were therefore more susceptible to being turned Communist than their heterosexual counterparts. This led to a crisis of masculinity where even the smallest suggestion of femininity could lead to accusations of potential compromise, an effect ...


Tolerance As A Way To Remember, Natalie Figueroa 2018 Chapman University

Tolerance As A Way To Remember, Natalie Figueroa

Voces Novae

This project examines the topic of Holocaust memorialization with a specific focus on the Simon Wiesenthal Center and their Los Angeles Museum of Tolerance. It posits that the mission and design of the museum were shaped by two major factors, first, the values of Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal for whom the Center was named, and second, racial and ethnic tensions within the City of Los Angeles during the late 1980s and early 1990s, which culminated in the Los Angeles riots in 1992 following the acquittal of four white police officers in the 1991 beating of Rodney King. The museum opened ...


Threads Of The Zoot Suit Riots: How The Initial Explanations For The Riots Hold Up Today, Antonio Franco 2018 Chapman University

Threads Of The Zoot Suit Riots: How The Initial Explanations For The Riots Hold Up Today, Antonio Franco

Voces Novae

This paper is about the 1943 Los Angeles Zoot suit Riots. These riots lasted for five days and were fought between the city’s young Mexican-American population and U.S. servicemen who were in the city. The name comes from a popular style that many young Mexican-Americans in L.A. wore at the time called the zoot suit. The Zoot Suit Riots was one of the most important moments in Chicano history. Throughout the riots as well as sometime afterward, many who were in the city at the time tried to discern its origins. The local newspapers, the Los Angeles ...


Fighting A War Without Rifles: Deconstructing The Image Of The Unflappable Medic, Robert Del Toro 2018 Chapman University

Fighting A War Without Rifles: Deconstructing The Image Of The Unflappable Medic, Robert Del Toro

Voces Novae

“Fighting a War Without Rifles: Deconstructing the Image of the Unflappable Medic” focuses on comparing the official romanticized image of the medic in World War II and the soldiers’ reality. During the Second World War, the US Army in Europe faced high casualty rates, and the soldiers of the Medical Department were tasked with treating the wounded. The medic was the first echelon of care that the wounded would receive, as well as the most important. After the War, the medics were portrayed in a romanticized light. Official literature presented them as highly competent soldiers; infantry men saw them as ...


The Warner Brothers Prove Their Patriotism, Lara Jacobson 2018 Chapman University

The Warner Brothers Prove Their Patriotism, Lara Jacobson

Voces Novae

Warner Bros. Pictures did not become the widely successful company they are today by sitting back and letting “the world go to pot.” The Brothers patriotic beginnings in America earned them a reputation as trailblazers in the motion picture industry. Their Polish and Jewish family heritage initially motivated the four brothers to take a stand when they released Confessions of a Nazi Spy (1939) as a direct result of Hitler’s growing reign in Europe. Many of the Brothers’ early movies focused on injustice, prejudice, and violation of basic human rights; the era of World War II would be no ...


"I See Genocide" - The Struggles Of The Ponca Nation To Reclaim Their City From Polluters, Douglas Fournet 2018 University of Puget Sound

"I See Genocide" - The Struggles Of The Ponca Nation To Reclaim Their City From Polluters, Douglas Fournet

History Theses

This thesis examines two court cases undertaken by the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma and residents of Ponca City and the surrounding areas against two polluting corporations on their land: Conoco and Continental Carbon. By analyzing the history of history of the Ponca alongside the history of Native American relations to the petroleum industry and the history of EPA enforcement problems, the paper sets out to demonstrate that the unique position of Native American tribes in the United States allows them to employ what Klyza and Sousa term "alternative pathways" in fighting environmental injustice.


Teaching Apportionment, Charles M. Biles 2018 Humboldt State University

Teaching Apportionment, Charles M. Biles

IdeaFest: Interdisciplinary Journal of Creative Works and Research from Humboldt State University

No abstract provided.


Bicentennial Provides Opportunity To Celebrate The Extraordinary And The Ordinary, Matthew R. Ballard 2018 Orleans County Department of History

Bicentennial Provides Opportunity To Celebrate The Extraordinary And The Ordinary, Matthew R. Ballard

Pioneer Record

Bicentennial celebrations are an opportunity to draw communities together, at a time when we are perhaps not as close-knit as past generations may have recalled. It is also a time to reflect on the contributions of the "common folk," scattered throughout the countryside, those who plowed their fields, raised their families, and made a modest living without recognition.


Strickler, Sally Ann (Mcleod) Koenig, 1933-2016 (Mss 643), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Strickler, Sally Ann (Mcleod) Koenig, 1933-2016 (Mss 643), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 643. Research materials collected by Sally Ann Strickler related to the Shaker community at South Union, Kentucky. This material deals chiefly with women’s roles in the society. Also includes information about the U.S. flag and Strickler’s dissertation on library services in Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredited institutions.


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