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Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph 2021 UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture

Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph

Digital Initiatives Symposium

Funded by a National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations Grant, the UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture’s “Mapping Renewal” pilot project focused on creating access to and providing spatial context to archival materials related to racial segregation and urban renewal in the city of Little Rock, Arkansas, from 1954-1989. An unplanned interdisciplinary collaboration with the UA Little Rock Arkansas Economic Development Institute (AEDI) has proven to be an invaluable partnership. One team member from each department will demonstrate the Mapping Renewal website and discuss how the collaborative process has changed and ...


Riots, Public Perception And Government Response In The Civil War South, Erik Lorenz 2021 Southern Adventist University

Riots, Public Perception And Government Response In The Civil War South, Erik Lorenz

Campus Research Day

This presentation examines bread riots in the Confederacy and political riots in Union-occupied territory. Southern newspapers reveal the Confederacy’s need to maintain order. Northern newspaper accounts used Southern riots to depict the Confederacy as weak, and suggest that the desire to avoid appearing weak shaped the Confederacy’s response. I will demonstrate how the desire to maintain order and avoid appearing weak tempered the Confederate use of military force and ensured riots were always met with welfare measures. In contrast, the conquering government of Union-occupied cities could and did maintain order by force, ignoring rioters’ demands.


Contributors, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Contributors, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

No abstract provided.


News And Notes, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

News And Notes, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Forts and fort sites in Florida, activities of local and regional historical societies


Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Reviews of When the World Ended: The Dairy of Emma LeConte. Edited by Earl Schenck Miers. (New York, Oxford University Press, 1957. xviii, 124, pp. Illustrations. $4.00.); Florida’s Last Frontier; The History of Collier County. By Charlton W. Tebeau. Copeland Studies in Florida History. (Coral Gables, University of Miami Press, 1957. 260 pp. Illustrations, maps, index. $3.50.); Negro Militia and Reconstruction. By Otis A. Singletary. (Austin, University of Texas Press, 1957. xi, 181 pp. Illustrations, bibliography, and index. $3.75.); Our Journey Through Florida. By Cleo Rainwater and Kathryn Abbey Hanna. (New York, American Book Company, 1957 ...


The Florida Secession Convention, Ralph A. Wooster 2021 University of Central Florida

The Florida Secession Convention, Ralph A. Wooster

Florida Historical Quarterly

The secession movement of 1851-52 received little support in Florida. Although the Compromise of 1850 was never very popular in the state, a majority of the citizenry accepted it as a solution to the sectional controversy. An indication of this sentiment was the re-election of Representative Edward C. Cabell in November, 1850, over Major John Beard. Cabell, who had voted against the Compromise proposals in the House, favored acquiescence to them once they had passed; Beard, the Democratic candidate, had stated he would resist the Compromise to the end. Cabell’s re-election was a victory for Florida unionists.


Some Letters To His Parents By A Floridian In The Confederate Army, Gilbert Wright 2021 University of Central Florida

Some Letters To His Parents By A Floridian In The Confederate Army, Gilbert Wright

Florida Historical Quarterly

The nineteen to twenty-two-year-old author of the letters that follow was destined, after the Civil War, to become a distinguished citizen of his native state. His death in 1908 was mourned by many hundreds “in all walks of life.” He had been active for more than forty years in the railroad enterprise, so important to the development of Florida. His rise in a few decades from clerk to first vice president in the Florida railroad world gave evidence that he possessed qualities for leadership. One may perceive, without reading between the lines, that the young soldier had these qualities.


Letters From The Second Seminole War, John K. Mahon 2021 University of Central Florida

Letters From The Second Seminole War, John K. Mahon

Florida Historical Quarterly

These pages are built around fragments drawn from the letters and diary entries written by Joseph R. Smith. They contain nothing important enough to require a reinterpretation of the Second Seminole War, 1835-1842; indeed they have little significance except that they enlarge the printed record left by the people who lived at that time. This record helps us, in spite of the one hundred and thirty years lying between, to bring to life their interesting era.


Life At Fort Brooke, 1824-1836, James W. Covington 2021 University of Central Florida

Life At Fort Brooke, 1824-1836, James W. Covington

Florida Historical Quarterly

In January, 1824 the military post known as Cantonment Brooke and later as Fort Brooke * was established at the juncture of Hillsborough River and the bay bearing the same name. There were many sites more suitable or a fort which could be found along the shores and islands of Tampa Bay; but the land at the chosen location had already been cleared and a house and wharf erected by Robert Hackley, a gentleman from New York who believed that his father held title to the land. Incidently, Hackley had left the property in charge of an overseer so that he ...


Florida Reconstruction Impeachments, Cortez A. M. Ewing 2021 University of Central Florida

Florida Reconstruction Impeachments, Cortez A. M. Ewing

Florida Historical Quarterly

The impeachment of Governor Harrison Reed not only contributes an interesting chapter to the history of Reconstruction but it also offers a number of novel precedents to the history of American impeachments. Throughout his gubernatorial term (1868-1872), Reed fought a consistent and courageous struggle against carpetbag politicians in Florida. I know of no other state or national civil officer against whom the impeachment remedy was so frequently attempted. On four occasions, he was threatened with legislative removal. Twice the lower house passed impeachment resolutions. Finally, in the last year of his term, his enemies voted a bona fide and legal ...


Title Page, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Title Page, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Title page for Volume 36, Number 4. Includes the Table of Contents


News And Notes, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

News And Notes, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Notice of the annual meeting, gifts, notes from local and regional historical societies, and contributors


Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Reviews of Seminole Music. By Frances Densmore. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 161. (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1956. xxviii, 218 pp. Plates, index. $1.00); The Negro and Southern Politics; A Chapter of Florida History. By Hugh Douglas Price. (New York, New York, University Press, 1957. 133 pp. $5.00); Gunner with Stonewall; Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague, a Memoir Written for His Children in 1903. Edited by Monroe F. Cockrell; with an Introduction by Bell Irwin Wiley. (Jackson, Tenn., McCowat-Mercer Press, 1957. 181 pp. Illustrations. $5.95)


Letters Of A Carpetbagger In Florida, 1866-1869, George E. Osborn 2021 University of Central Florida

Letters Of A Carpetbagger In Florida, 1866-1869, George E. Osborn

Florida Historical Quarterly

These letters, written by Daniel Richards to Elihu B. Washburne, throw considerable light on the hectic days of Reconstruction in Florida. Not only do these friendly messages reveal much of what the author actually witnessed of the United States military occupation in the peninsula state but a number of referenes are made to the chaotic economic conditions which existed generally at that time. Although Florida had fewer Negroes in proportion to population than some of the former Confederate states, the problem of relations between the races was one with great complexities. At least some of the obstacles to the establishment ...


The Cession Of Florida And John Quincy Adams, Secretary Of State, Lester Harris 2021 University of Central Florida

The Cession Of Florida And John Quincy Adams, Secretary Of State, Lester Harris

Florida Historical Quarterly

The cession of the Floridas stands out as one of the greatest victories in the history of American diplomacy. Ownership of Florida insured to the United States a continuous seaboard on the Atlantic Ocean. It led to the recognition by the United States of the South American colonies, then in revolt against Spain. The treaty with Spain gave the United States its first recognized claim to the western lands bordering on the Pacific Ocean. 2 It became the basis for the acquisition of Oregon and Washington, and parts of present day Montana and Idaho. Cession led directly to the Monroe ...


Autobiography Of William Marvin, Kevin E. Kearney 2021 University of Central Florida

Autobiography Of William Marvin, Kevin E. Kearney

Florida Historical Quarterly

Sixty-five years ago, a venerable man in Skaneateles, New York, set himself to the task of recording the events of his life. What William Marvin wrote between the pages of a lined composition notebook was more than an autobiography. It was a chapter in American history. What is even more significant is that much of what Marvin recounted pertained to the history of Florida during the critical years 1835-1866, a period which found the nation challenged with the issues of union, disunion, and reunion. The story which follows, then, is the story of a man who served Florida during the ...


Title Page, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Title Page, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Title page for Volume 36, Number 3. Includes the Table of Contents


News And Notes, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

News And Notes, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Notes from local and regional historical societies, contributors to the issue, new members


Book Review: The Unconquered Seminole Indians, James W. Covington 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Review: The Unconquered Seminole Indians, James W. Covington

Florida Historical Quarterly

Review of by Irvin M. Peithmann (St. Petersburg, Fla., The Great Outdoors Association, 1956. 96 pp. Illustrations, $1.00.)


Book Review: This Changing South, C. W. Tebeau 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Review: This Changing South, C. W. Tebeau

Florida Historical Quarterly

Review of This Changing South. By John M. Maclachlan and Joe S. Floyd, Jr. (Gainesville, University of Florida Press, 1956. xii, 154 pp. Appendix, Index, Tables $4.00.)


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