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12,519 full-text articles. Page 164 of 174.

Beyond The Battlefield: A Simple Matchbook And A Rabbit Hole, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

Beyond The Battlefield: A Simple Matchbook And A Rabbit Hole, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

A couple months ago, at the annual spring Gettysburg antique show, I found a small display of Civilian Conservation Corps items. Pennants and coins, matchbook covers and pins all displayed on a piece of foam-core. One caught my eye. For $10, I became the proud owner of a matchbook cover, never used, from a CCC Camp in Gettysburg. Company 1355 was stationed at Camp NP - 2 - Pa., now known as the Boy Scout / youth camping area at McMillan woods. I was thrilled. [excerpt]


A.L. Burruss: The Life Of A Georgia Politician And A Man To Trust, Margaret Walters 2011 Kennesaw State University

A.L. Burruss: The Life Of A Georgia Politician And A Man To Trust, Margaret Walters

KSU Press Legacy Project

A. L. Burruss was an extraordinary, compassionate, self-effacing, and personable man. He was the eldest of eleven children and son of a painter and carpenter whose family moved to Smyrna, Georgia in the 1930s. After high school, the Navy trained him as a refrigeration machinist and the imaginative and hard-working Burruss used his skills to start a refrigeration business. Eventually Burruss bought out one of his clients-a partner with Tim Top Poultry in Marietta, Georgia-and helped the company to become immensely successful. Despite his prosperity, Burruss ran for political office as "a way to help others" and achieved political prominence …


Traces Volume 39, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections 2011 Western Kentucky University

Traces Volume 39, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections

Traces, the Southern Central Kentucky, Barren County Genealogical Newsletter

Traces, the South Central Kentucky Genealogical Society's quarterly newsletter, was first published in 1973. The Society changed its name in 2016 to the Barren County Historical Society. The publication features compiled genealogies, articles on local history, single-family studies and unpublished source materials related to this area.


Longhunter, Southern Kentucky Genealogical Society Newsletter Volume 34, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections 2011 Western Kentucky University

Longhunter, Southern Kentucky Genealogical Society Newsletter Volume 34, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections

Longhunter, Southern Kentucky Genealogical Society Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Glorious Fourth: Gettysburg's Joyful Holiday, 1861, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

Glorious Fourth: Gettysburg's Joyful Holiday, 1861, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

Samuel J. Vandersloot, a 25 year old Gettysburg attorney, enlisted as a private the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment on April 20th, 1861. Less than a month after he and his comrades published their paper, on the 26th of July Vandersloot was mustered from service at Harrisburg. Five days before, the Army of Northeastern Virginia had its nose bloodied at Manassas. Picnickers, keen on sightseeing and eager to witness the one great battle of the war became entangled on the roads among the retreating Federal forces. Civilian and soldier alike became prey to the advancing rebel forces, some captured and sent …


James Lee Davis, 2011 Georgia Southern University

James Lee Davis

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Hessie Walker Hardy, 2011 Georgia Southern University

Hessie Walker Hardy

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Brother Earnest Brown, 2011 Georgia Southern University

Brother Earnest Brown

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

Locks And Cash: Whose Black History? (Part 1), John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

The African-American Civil War Memorial has been a favorite site of mine in DC (and not simply because it's just down the block from the District's best restaurant, Ben's Chili Bowl). It is a monument in the right setting. Instead of being on the mall with the rest of the other monuments, to be easily overlooked like the DC World War I memorial or similar sidelights to the big three of Lincoln, Washington and Vietnam, the African American Civil War Memorial is in a community that can be moved by it. [excerpt]


Charles L. (C.L.) Bailey, 2011 Georgia Southern University

Charles L. (C.L.) Bailey

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


"...Sexual Relations With That Woman...": Why The Lee Quote Is Still Valid, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

"...Sexual Relations With That Woman...": Why The Lee Quote Is Still Valid, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

A quick reflection this week. This started as a comment on Brooks Simpson's comments on Colin Woodward's blog post at his new blog civilwarhistorian highlighting a quote he found in a Massachusetts newspaper. Whew... now that that's out of the way.

The validity of the quote has been called into question, and seemingly thereby its usefulness to the historian. But I object to consigning this tidbit to the dustbin of history. [excerpt]


June 16, 2011 Executive Committee Meeting Minutes, Shawnee State University 2011 Shawnee State University

June 16, 2011 Executive Committee Meeting Minutes, Shawnee State University

Minutes of the Board of Trustees Meetings

Minutes of the June 16, 2010 Executive Committee meeting, Board of Trustees.


Slavery And Justice: What Brown University Has Taught Me About Public History, Jacob Dinkelaker 2011 National Park Service

Slavery And Justice: What Brown University Has Taught Me About Public History, Jacob Dinkelaker

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

In the post today, I want to add to that debate by discussing Brown University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice. John recently turned me on to this, and while I still haven’t read the whole report (available in pdf), I’m really impressed by what I’ve read so far. For those of you who are not familiar with the report, I highly recommend it - it is very insightful. The Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice report documents Brown University’s public struggle with its historic foundations which, are tied inextricably to the economics of slavery and the …


Bobby G. Drummer, 2011 Georgia Southern University

Bobby G. Drummer

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Interpreting Beyond The Battles: Could We Start With The Klan?, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

Interpreting Beyond The Battles: Could We Start With The Klan?, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

In 1925, the Pennsylvania Klan held its annual convention in Gettysburg in September. The Times called the Klan's parade through town a, "gorgeous display," and a, "monster procession." The Times headline trumpeted that, "vary-colored robes, capes and gowns present spectacle as Knights, Klanswomen and Junior Members march under warm September sun before large crowds along sidewalks." [excerpt]


June 6, 2011 University Chronicle, Shawnee State University 2011 Shawnee State University

June 6, 2011 University Chronicle, Shawnee State University

University Chronicle

Shawnee State University Student Newspaper


"For The People...": Do The 'Not We' Own Gettysburg?, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

"For The People...": Do The 'Not We' Own Gettysburg?, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

Unlike a few critics from the Civil War blogging community of this past Monday's History Channel presentation of Gettysburg, I watched the whole thing from beginning to end. I've since watched it again. I took mental notes; I paid keen attention.

Monday night I also watched on Twitter. I expected the experience to be very different than a couple weeks ago, when I watched with America as freedom fighters were beat to a bloody pulp for suggesting that we all might be better off if we tried to get along. Not badly different, just different. I was not disappointed. …


No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness And Progress In The Vietnam War, Gregory A. Daddis 2011 Chapman University

No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness And Progress In The Vietnam War, Gregory A. Daddis

History Faculty Books and Book Chapters

Conventional wisdom holds that the US Army in Vietnam, thrust into an unconventional war where occupying terrain was a meaningless measure of success, depended on body counts as its sole measure of military progress. In No Sure Victory, Army officer and historian Gregory Daddis looks far deeper into the Army's techniques for measuring military success and presents a much more complicated-and disturbing-account of the American misadventure in Indochina.


"...Never Forget What They Did Here": Memorial Day 2011, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

"...Never Forget What They Did Here": Memorial Day 2011, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

One of my pleasures on this holiday is to buy and place a flag on the monument to the 14th U.S. Regulars in the valley of death. Along the banks of Plum Run, the Regulars held back an onslaught from a pell-mell group of charging Confederates in what would be the final phase of the fight in the Wheatfield and Devil's Den area on July 2nd, 1863. As they retreated back across the swampy lowlands, Confederates hot on their heels, their own gunners on the slopes of the hill had no choice but to fire into the mangled mess of …


Empathizing With The Slave; Empathizing With The Slave-Owner, John M. Rudy 2011 Gettysburg College

Empathizing With The Slave; Empathizing With The Slave-Owner, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

Living inside of the world of the past is often the most difficult thing an interpreter can help her audience to do. But, in spite of its difficulty, it is the most necessary. The adage that before you insult a man, you must walk a mile in his shoes is correct. [excerpt]


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