Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,901 Full-Text Articles 2,780 Authors 1,414,188 Downloads 237 Institutions

All Articles in Political History

Faceted Search

4,901 full-text articles. Page 100 of 101.

“Say Uncle” Reagan Doctrine And Nicaragua, Jordan L. Kasler 2010 Western Oregon University

“Say Uncle” Reagan Doctrine And Nicaragua, Jordan L. Kasler

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

On Friday October 16, 1981, President Ronald Reagan wrote in his personal diary, “Central America is really the world’s next hotspot. Nicaragua is an armed camp supplied by Cuba and threatening a communist takeover of all of Central America.” For the next eight years as Commander-in-Chief, this mindset would shape his perspective on the small Third World country about the size of North Carolina. The Administration’s policies, actions, and attitudes toward Nicaragua and other perceived hostile nations became known as “Reagan Doctrine.” The defeat of the Nicaraguan Revolution became the “cornerstone of the Reagan Central American policy and ...


The First Islamist Republic: Development And Disintegration Of Islamism In The Sudan (Review), Heather J. Sharkey 2010 University of Pennsylvania

The First Islamist Republic: Development And Disintegration Of Islamism In The Sudan (Review), Heather J. Sharkey

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In this careful and engagingly written analysis of Hasan al-Turabi's decade in power, Abdullahi A. Gallab concludes that the experience of Sudan during the "first Islamist republic" (1989-99) serves as a warning against "ideological entrapments" (p. 167) of all kinds, and leads to the "realization that Islamism, like all other isms, can be and should be contested" (p. ix). Drawing upon extensive interviews with Sudanese Islamists, as well as upon Arabic and English studies, Gallab summarizes the Islamist experiment in dismal terms. He variously calls it a "reign of terror," a "trauma," a source of "despair," "an open-ended system ...


Bolivia's Coca Headache: The Agroyungas Program, Inflation, Campesinos, Coca And Capitalism In Bolivia, John D. Roberts 2010 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Bolivia's Coca Headache: The Agroyungas Program, Inflation, Campesinos, Coca And Capitalism In Bolivia, John D. Roberts

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

Bolivia in the 1980s was wracked by monetary inflation approaching levels of the German Weimar Republic. Immediately following this time of great financial crisis in Bolivia, the U.N. founded a project through the U.N.D.P. to encourage peasant farmers in Bolivia to switch from growing coca (the plant used manufacture cocaine) to growing other cash crops for market. This crop substitution and development program, called the Agroyungas Project, lasted from 1985 to 1991 and is the focus of this study. While many U.N. pundits and journalists considered the program’s initial small successes promising, it has ...


Review Of Taming The Leviathan: The Reception Of The Political And Religious Ideas Of Thomas Hobbes In England 1640-1700 By Jon Parkin, Geoffrey M. Vaughan 2010 Assumption College

Review Of Taming The Leviathan: The Reception Of The Political And Religious Ideas Of Thomas Hobbes In England 1640-1700 By Jon Parkin, Geoffrey M. Vaughan

Political Science Department Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


Democratic Triumph, Scholarly Pessimism, Bruce Gilley 2010 Portland State University

Democratic Triumph, Scholarly Pessimism, Bruce Gilley

Political Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

This article discusses how the democratic form of government has gone from an oddity to the most common form of government in the world. The written works on democracy in the past twenty years have dealt primarily with the writers' growing sense of insecurity, the belief that history runs in cycles, and the belief that democracy will run its course and the world will find itself returned to an authoritarian existence. Samuel P. Huntington expressed his pessimism with democracy in his book "The Third Wave." Huntington believes that only countries with a substantial Western influence will be able to sustain ...


“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale 2010 Marshall University

“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

History Faculty Research

Following the American Revolution, the new United States government and its citizenry greedily cast their eyes westward across the expansive trans-Appalachian frontier. The contest between the region’s native peoples, Anglo-American westerners, and Spanish colonists for the trans-Appalachian West began long before the first shots of the Revolution were fired at Lexington & Concord. From the near perpetual regional Indian warfare to the diplomatic maneuverings of Euroamerican backcountry leaders, the struggle to control the land the Indians called the “western waters” defined borderland relations for most of the 18th century. Historians have devoted a great deal of scholarly energy to chronicling ...


Building Historical Imagination With Three Potato, Two Carrots, And One Onion, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg 2010 Iowa State University

Building Historical Imagination With Three Potato, Two Carrots, And One Onion, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Cultivating historical imagination in undergraduate students is often a difficult task. The distance between their lives, generally lived in the last quarter century, and the ways in which people lived i the pre-World War II period can be enormous. The task becomes even more difficult when students think that certain elements of their lives in the present are much more similar to those of previous eras than they actually are. Case in point is the Great Depression. Given the current economic downturn, many students are convinced that, in some ways, they are living in a situation akin to that of ...


The Railroads Must Have Ties: A Legal History Of Forest Conservation And The Oregon & California Railroad Land Grant, 1887-1916, Sean M. Kammer 2010 University of South Dakota School of Law

The Railroads Must Have Ties: A Legal History Of Forest Conservation And The Oregon & California Railroad Land Grant, 1887-1916, Sean M. Kammer

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

Historians have! for the most part! left unchallenged a similar negative view of Edward H. Harriman, who headed both the Union Pacific and the Southern Pacific and was perhaps the most powerful of the railroad tycoons during the first decade of the twentieth century.4 Prior to Harriman's takeover of the Southern Pacific in 1901, that railroad's long-standing policy had been to subdivide and sell lands to farmers, miners, and loggers, the purpose being lito encourage long-term settlement, economic growth, and rail traffic," but Harriman questioned and ultimately rejected this policy.s In January 1903, he ordered the ...


Not Undertaking The Almost-Impossible Task: The 1961 Wire Act’S Development, Initial Applications, And Ultimate Purpose, David G. Schwartz 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Not Undertaking The Almost-Impossible Task: The 1961 Wire Act’S Development, Initial Applications, And Ultimate Purpose, David G. Schwartz

Library Faculty Publications

For a Camelot-era piece of legislation, the Wire Act has a long and unintended shadow. Used haltingly in the 1960s, when the Wire Act failed to deliver the death blow to organized crime, 1970’s Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) became a far better weapon against the mob. Yet starting in the 1990s, the Wire Act enjoyed a second life, when the Justice Department used to it prosecute operators of online betting Web sites that, headquartered in jurisdictions where such businesses were legal, took bets from American citizens. The legislative history of the Wire Act, however, suggests that it ...


Votes For Women: Women's Suffrage, Gendered Political Culture, And Progressive Era Masculinity In The State Of Indiana, Lindsay E. Rump 2010 Butler University

Votes For Women: Women's Suffrage, Gendered Political Culture, And Progressive Era Masculinity In The State Of Indiana, Lindsay E. Rump

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

This thesis will examine gendered political culture and masculinity in Indiana during the Progressive Era, leading up to the enfranchisement of women. Using articles from newspapers and periodicals, this work will examine how women were presented in the public sphere, how they were methodically portrayed as the lighter sex, used for advertising for clothing or appliances and never taken seriously as political figures. Then, this paper will ex plain the profile of women's suffrage in Indiana, how the women in this state began the fight for the vote, the women and the conventions that carried it onward, and finally ...


Had Your Imperial Army Not Invaded: Japan's Role In The Making Of Modern China, Joshua Hubbard 2010 Marshall University

Had Your Imperial Army Not Invaded: Japan's Role In The Making Of Modern China, Joshua Hubbard

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

By 1936, the Guomindang had seemingly managed to secure its political dominance by nearly annihilating its main adversary, the Chinese Communist Party. In 1937, the Japanese army began a full-scale invasion of China that would forever change its political landscape. During the subsequent eight-year war, the Guomindang government collapsed, plagued by economic difficulties and internal corruption. Simultaneously, the small group of communists in Yan’an grew into a virulent force of opposition, with vast amounts of territory and the support of the masses. Nearly all components of this drastic turn of events can be linked to the imperialist expansion of ...


Short Term Strategies For Long Term Power: The Rise And Potential Fall Of Hugo Chávez, Linden E.S. Schult 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Short Term Strategies For Long Term Power: The Rise And Potential Fall Of Hugo Chávez, Linden E.S. Schult

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis explores the route to power of Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez and the methods by which he has remained in power throughout his presidency. Also, it explores the potential for Chávez to lose power, given the current economic and political situation in Venezuela. The importance of the oil industry, Chávez's suppression of the opposition and control of the media, and constitutional changes and reforms are all discussed as keys to Chávez's continuance in power.


Die Darstellung Der Evangelischen Kirche Als Eine Neue Familie In Erich Loests Nikolaikirche, Beth A. Roberts 2010 Illinois Wesleyan University

Die Darstellung Der Evangelischen Kirche Als Eine Neue Familie In Erich Loests Nikolaikirche, Beth A. Roberts

Honors Projects

Throughout the end of the 1980s the Lutheran Church in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) experienced a surge of attendance and social activism in an otherwise secularized society. Research shows that the church was the sole island of dissent within the communist GDR. St. Nicolas Church in the city of Leipzig became the prototype of social involvement; visionary pastors opened their doors to every citizen and provided a space for congregations to voice concerns, organize interest groups, and plan peace protests. The construction of an open environment in which citizens could speak and interact gave rise to a greater sense ...


Government And Politics Newsletter, Issue 6, Sacred Heart University 2010 Sacred Heart University

Government And Politics Newsletter, Issue 6, Sacred Heart University

Government and Politics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Ua94/6/3 Student/Alumni Student Publications, WKU Archives 2010 Western Kentucky University

Ua94/6/3 Student/Alumni Student Publications, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Collection Inventories

Underground publications created by students while attending WKU, includes 1960's/1970's political protest papers such as the Apocalypse and the Expatriate. How to Survive is a guide to courses and professors to avoid and a guide to life in Bowling Green for university students. The Big Red Tool a 21st century satirical take on WKU is also found here. Student groups and anonymous editors have written and self-published broadsides and newspapers at WKU since the 1960's. These publications were generally a reaction to university policies regarding the publication of the College Heights Herald and a curtailment of ...


Governing Gambling In The United States, Maria E. Garcia 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Governing Gambling In The United States, Maria E. Garcia

CMC Senior Theses

The role risk taking has played in American history has helped shape current legislation concerning gambling. This thesis attempts to explain the discrepancies in legislation regarding distinct forms of gambling. While casinos are heavily regulated by state and federal laws, most statutes dealing with lotteries strive to regulate the activities of other parties instead of those of the lottery institutions. Incidentally, lotteries are the only form of gambling completely managed by the government. It can be inferred that the United States government is more concerned with people exploiting gambling than with the actual practice of wagering.

In an effort to ...


Jose P. Laurel And Jorge B. Vargas: Issues Of Collaboration And Loyalty During The Japanese Occupation Of The Philippines, Jonathan Black 2010 Claremont Mckenna College

Jose P. Laurel And Jorge B. Vargas: Issues Of Collaboration And Loyalty During The Japanese Occupation Of The Philippines, Jonathan Black

CMC Senior Theses

In this paper I looked at the actions that were taken by Jose P. Laurel and Jorge Vargas during the occupation of the Philippines country by Japanese Imperial forces during World War II. I was mostly interested in the idea of loyalties that occurred in places that were occupied throughout history and what constituted the lines that would be drawn when the leaders of those countries decided to do what was best for their people. I started by researching the many of the Occupied countries of Japan and determined one in which there was a more controversial and grayed line ...


0777: Kenneth Hechler Papers, 1958-1976, Marshall University Special Collections 2010 Marshall University

0777: Kenneth Hechler Papers, 1958-1976, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

Personal family papers, photographs and correspondence. Includes research material for Hechler's book, "The Bridge at Remagen". Also includes campaign material for Congressional races, West Virginia Secretary of State and a bid for the governorship of West Virginia.


A Disappearing Boundary?: The Changing Distinction Between Combatants And Civilians From The First World War To The Present Day, Aimee Kidder 2010 Colby College

A Disappearing Boundary?: The Changing Distinction Between Combatants And Civilians From The First World War To The Present Day, Aimee Kidder

Honors Theses

The issue of terrorism has stimulated intellectual debate regarding the rights and protections that should be afforded to civilians. However, the practice of targeting noncombatants in warfare extends far beyond terrorism and has roots deep in the historical past. This study looks at violence against civilians over a series of case studies from the First and Second World Wars as well as the French-Algerian War of the 1950s and 1960s. By looking at the changing legal distinctions between combatants and noncombatants, the study first establishes a trend in international law toward increasing protection of civilians. Yet, these legal advances are ...


Theodore Roosevelt On Labor Unions: A New Perspective, Louis B. Livingston 2010 Portland State University

Theodore Roosevelt On Labor Unions: A New Perspective, Louis B. Livingston

Dissertations and Theses

Historical studies of Theodore Roosevelt's views about labor and labor unions are in conflict. This was also true of contemporary disagreements about the meaning of his labor rhetoric and actions. The uncertainties revolve around whether or not he was sincere in his support of working people and labor unions, whether his words and actions were political only or were based on a philosophical foundation, and why he did not propose comprehensive labor policies.

Roosevelt historiography has addressed these questions without considering his stated admiration for Octave Thanet's writings about "labor problems." Octave Thanet was the pseudonym of Alice ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress