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Emigration As A Political Stance? Moroccan Migrants' Narratives Of Dignity, Human Rights And Minority Identities In Transnational Context, Anna Virkama 2015 University of Tampere

Emigration As A Political Stance? Moroccan Migrants' Narratives Of Dignity, Human Rights And Minority Identities In Transnational Context, Anna Virkama

Mathal

The protest movements known as the Arab Spring brought the frustration and disappointment of the North African citizens with their governments to the world's attention. Five years after the Arab Spring, the issues of human rights and individual freedom remain important issues in the democratic transition of the Arab societies. Since the countries in North Africa have also been important migrant sending countries for decades, the connection between mass emigration and human right issues forms an interesting research area. This empirical article aims to bring a new perspective to the debate by analysing the narratives dignity, human rights and ...


The Independent Press After The "Moroccan Spring", Hamza Tayebi 2015 Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah University, Faculty of Letters Dhar El Mehraz

The Independent Press After The "Moroccan Spring", Hamza Tayebi

Mathal

The wave of Arab Spring that started in Tunisia and Egypt arrived to Morocco in 2011 paving the way to unprecedented organized mass-protests all over the country. Among the demands raised by the 20 February Movement protesters was the demand for free and independent media outlets, especially the press. King Mohammed VI, the Commander of the Faithful and the highest authority in Morocco, promised in a televised speech on March 9th to introduce "radical" and "genuine" constitutional reforms that would democratize the country. In fact, King Mohammed VI has so far succeeded in calming down and co-opting the demonstrations, but ...


Policing Slavery: Order And The Development Of Early Nineteenth-Century New Orleans And Salvador, Gregory K. Weimer 2015 PhD Student

Policing Slavery: Order And The Development Of Early Nineteenth-Century New Orleans And Salvador, Gregory K. Weimer

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

My dissertation explores the development of policing and slavery in two early nineteenth-century Atlantic cities. This project engages regionally distinct histories through an examination of legislative and police records in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Salvador, Bahia. Through these sources, my dissertation holds that the development of the theories and practices that guided “public order” emerged in similar ways in these Atlantic slaveholding cities. Enslaved people and their actions played an integral role in the evolution of “good order” and its policing. Legislators created laws and institutions to police enslaved people and promote order. In these instances, local government policed slavery ...


The President's Wartime Detention Authority : What History Teaches Us, Anirudh Sivaram 2015 Yale University

The President's Wartime Detention Authority : What History Teaches Us, Anirudh Sivaram

Harvey M. Applebaum ’59 Award

This thesis examines the extent of the President’s wartime detention authority over citizens (in particular, detention authority pursuant to Article II of the U.S. Constitution) through a legal-historical lens. Some Presidents (Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, George W. Bush) have historically relied on Article II authority for detention, while others (Ulysses Grant, Barack Obama) have disclaimed the notion that such authority exists. Clarifying the scope and source of the Presidential detention authority over citizens bears both theoretical and real-world relevance. Theoretically, it lies at the confluence of two central American constitutional traditions – the separation of powers, and the protection ...


Legal Writing: A History From The Colonial Era To The End Of The Civil War, David R. Cleveland 2015 Valparaiso University

Legal Writing: A History From The Colonial Era To The End Of The Civil War, David R. Cleveland

David R. Cleveland

No abstract provided.


Traditional Knowledge And Social Science On Trial: Battles Over Evidence In Indigenous Rights Litigation In Canada And Australia, Arthur J. Ray 2015 University of British Columbia

Traditional Knowledge And Social Science On Trial: Battles Over Evidence In Indigenous Rights Litigation In Canada And Australia, Arthur J. Ray

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

Traditional knowledge and oral traditions history are crucial lines of evidence in Aboriginal claims litigation and alternative forms of resolution, most notably claims commissions. This article explores the ways in which these lines of evidence pose numerous challenges in terms of how and where they can be presented, who is qualified to present it, questions about whether this evidence can stand on its own, and the problems of developing appropriate measures to protect it from inappropriate use by outsiders while not unduly restricting access by the traditional owners.


From Public Good To Public Disgrace: Eugenics In North Carolina, Meghan M. McGuirk 2015 Western Kentucky University

From Public Good To Public Disgrace: Eugenics In North Carolina, Meghan M. Mcguirk

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

This CE/T project explores the sterilization program in North Carolina in the twentieth century. From 1929 to 1974, over 7,600 men, women, and children were sterilized by the Eugenics Board of North Carolina, a department of the state government of North Carolina. The North Carolina legislature enacted legislation that allowed for the forced sterilization of persons considered “feeble-minded” or a threat to the public good of society. The perceived threat to society changed over the course of the program from patients in mental institutions to low socio-economic women seen as a burden to the public. The mechanism for ...


Secession And The Confederate Interpretation Of Its Legality, Jim Dick 2015 American Public University System

Secession And The Confederate Interpretation Of Its Legality, Jim Dick

Saber and Scroll

When several states in the southern portion of the United States declared their secession in 1861, it was the first and only time in American history that any state actually attempted to do so. The resulting conflict wrought devastation throughout the South and engendered significant change to all levels of American society. Despite the failure of the Confederacy to secede from the Union, the question remains—why did the South think it had the legal right to secede? In exploring that question, this paper will examine the issue of secession in America and three pivotal documents in history, which when ...


Land And Law In The Age Of Enterprise: A Legal History Of Railroad Land Grants In The Pacific Northwest, 1864-1916, Sean M. Kammer 2015 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Land And Law In The Age Of Enterprise: A Legal History Of Railroad Land Grants In The Pacific Northwest, 1864-1916, Sean M. Kammer

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

Federal land subsidies to railroad corporations comprised an important part of the federal government’s policies towards its western land domain in the middle decades of the nineteenth century. In all, Congress granted over a hundred million acres to railroad corporations to subsidize construction of a transcontinental railway network. Long after the last such grant in 1871, these land grants continued to incite political contests in Congress and state legislatures and legal disputes in communities across the West. By the end of the century, railroad corporations had become manifestations not just of the threatening growth of corporate power in the ...


Foundations Of Empire: The American Military Government In The Philippine-American War, 1899-1902, Luke Frerichs 2015 College of William and Mary

Foundations Of Empire: The American Military Government In The Philippine-American War, 1899-1902, Luke Frerichs

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper discusses the American military government in the Philippine islands during the Philippine-American War. It examines the legal and political foundations of the American territory system and the Philippine islands place in the new American system. It then examines how the United States Army formed the colonial government by modifying the preceding Spanish colonial state through a series of General Orders that reshaped the municipal structure in the Philippine Islands. It then goes on to discuss Filipino nationalist responses to the new American government including the introduction of Amigo warfare and the American response through the use of forced ...


The Thesis Of Norm Transformation In The Theory Of Mass Atrocity, Paul Morrow 2015 University of Virginia - Main Campus

The Thesis Of Norm Transformation In The Theory Of Mass Atrocity, Paul Morrow

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

Theoretical accounts of genocide and mass atrocity commonly embrace the thesis of norm transformation. This thesis holds, first, that individual and institutional participation in such crimes is at least partially explained by transformations in basic norms that structure social and political life. It holds, second, that preventing future occurrences of such crimes requires changing norms that currently govern the actions of particular individual and institutional actors. This paper clarifies, defends, and extends the thesis of norm transformation. It clarifies this thesis by providing a general account of the nature and dynamics of norms. It defends this thesis against charges of ...


A Howl Of Free Expression: The 1957 Howl Obscenity Trial And Sexual Liberation, Jamie L. Rehlaender 2015 Lakeridge High School

A Howl Of Free Expression: The 1957 Howl Obscenity Trial And Sexual Liberation, Jamie L. Rehlaender

Young Historians Conference

The 1957 “Howl” obscenity trial, which covered the constitutionality of utilizing obscene words in literature, was largely influential in the development of literary free expression in America. This case centered on Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems, a work which represented the ideals and culture of the literarily experimental and sexually promiscuous Beat Generation. The expansion of free expression can be discerned through the tolerance of these sexual implications in literature, which is documented throughout the history of sexual suppression in past censorship cases. The victory of the “Howl” obscenity trial was essential for liberating the use of sexual ...


Civil And Common Law: A Historical Analysis Of Colonial And Postcolonial Canada, Patrick S. Stroud 2015 Wabash College

Civil And Common Law: A Historical Analysis Of Colonial And Postcolonial Canada, Patrick S. Stroud

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research

Legal historians divide European law into two principal families: common law (British law) and civil law (continental European law). Common law judges favor cases; courts “discover” law on a case-by-case basis and those cases make precedents for future ruling. Civil law courts favor codes; courts compare cases to existing laws and those laws control judges’ rulings. The two rarely interact, save one prominent example: Canada. British common law supposedly superseded French legal traditions in colonial Canada. But is history so binary? Did British common law truly “conquer” French civil law? Through analysis of Canadian legal history, this article demonstrates how ...


Black White And In-Between: Race And Ethnicity In The Criminal Justice System 1885-1915, Elizabeth M. Wilhelm 2015 University of Dayton

Black White And In-Between: Race And Ethnicity In The Criminal Justice System 1885-1915, Elizabeth M. Wilhelm

Honors Theses

Events in the past year have brought racial and ethnic discrimination in the criminal justice system to the forefront of American consciousness. In reality, race has been used to create stereotypes for centuries, often supported by “scientific” and “statistical” evidence to support the idea that certain races are more likely to commit crimes than others. In my research, I trace the development of these ideas as well as the evidence used to support these racial notions primarily by drawing upon conference transcripts from two professional organizations: The National Prison Association and the National Conference of Charities and Corrections covering the ...


Black Slaves, Christian Servants: Race And Legal Identity In Northampton And Middlesex Counties, Virginia, 1632-1705, Timothy A. Courtney 2015 College of William and Mary

Black Slaves, Christian Servants: Race And Legal Identity In Northampton And Middlesex Counties, Virginia, 1632-1705, Timothy A. Courtney

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper analyzes how the language used in 17th-century laws and court cases refers to enslaved Africans and other servants, and it explores what this language reveals about regional differences in how Virginia colonists conceptualized ethnicity and labor in their society.


Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson 2015 Willamette University

Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson

Brandy G Robinson

Minority rights and religion have never been topics that are simultaneously considered. However, arguably, the two have relevance, especially when combined with the topic and theory of constitutionalism. Historically and traditionally, minorities have been granted certain rights and have been denied certain rights under various constitutions. These grants and denials relate to cultural differences and values, arguably relating to a culture’s understanding and interpretation of religion.

This article explores the relationship and status of minority rights as it relates to religiosity and constitutionalism. Essentially, there is a correlation between these topics and research shows where certain nations have used ...


Chicago's "Great Boodle Trial", Todd Haugh 2015 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Chicago's "Great Boodle Trial", Todd Haugh

Todd Haugh

No abstract provided.


New Perspectives On European Women’S Legal History, Sara L. Kimble, Marion Rowekamp 2015 DePaul University

New Perspectives On European Women’S Legal History, Sara L. Kimble, Marion Rowekamp

School for New Learning Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Adams County History 2015, 2015 Gettysburg College

Adams County History 2015

Adams County History

No abstract provided.


The Brutal Murder Of George J. Bushman, Conrad B. Richter, Dale J. Molina 2015 Gettysburg College

The Brutal Murder Of George J. Bushman, Conrad B. Richter, Dale J. Molina

Adams County History

In the fall of 1918 there occurred in Adams County a singularly brutal murder that brought the County and the town of Gettysburg to a shocked standstill. The tentacles of this event would reach into four Pennsylvania counties: Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, and Philadelphia, and eventually the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. The investigation of the crime and the trial of the perpetrators involved so many public officials and families, as well as the extended judicial system and geographical locations within and without the County, that we have included a Cast of Characters and Locations to assist the reader in following this convoluted ...


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