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Unmade And Unmanned Men: Reading Traumatized Masculinity In Late Nineteenth-Century British Adventure Fiction Through The Lens Of The Indian “Mutiny” Of 1857, Madison A. Bettle 2021 The University of Western Ontario

Unmade And Unmanned Men: Reading Traumatized Masculinity In Late Nineteenth-Century British Adventure Fiction Through The Lens Of The Indian “Mutiny” Of 1857, Madison A. Bettle

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Unmade and Unmanned Men: Reading Traumatized Masculinity in Late Nineteenth-Century British Adventure Fiction through the Lens of the Indian “Mutiny” of 1857 examines the selected adventure fiction of George Alfred Henty, Rudyard Kipling, and Joseph Conrad through the historico-political context of India’s First War of Independence, known in Victorian Britain as the Indian “Mutiny” of 1857. Examining masculine trauma in adventure fiction reveals how British men, who were themselves colonized by the Empire’s expectations of them, sought not only to recover from the scars inflicted by imperialism, but also to expose the Empire for inflicting the psychologically damaging expectations that …


In This Harsh World, We Continue To Draw Breath: Queer Persistence In Shakespeare And Hamlet, Beck O. Adelante 2021 University of Washington Tacoma

In This Harsh World, We Continue To Draw Breath: Queer Persistence In Shakespeare And Hamlet, Beck O. Adelante

Access*: Interdisciplinary Journal of Student Research and Scholarship

Hamlet is one of Shakespeare’s most famous and most often (mis-)quoted works. The central and titular character has likewise been an endless source of academic and artistic inquiry and exploration since nearly the creation of the work itself. However, this paper argues that a crucial and enlightening piece of the puzzle has, until recently, been left unexplored for the most part, considered a frivolous or non-serious pursuit: Hamlet’s and Hamlet’s queerness. Using historical research and evidence, close readings of the text, and examples of recent productions that have taken this element seriously, this paper argues that to fully understand the …


Y’All Means All: The Southern Queer Experience And Grassroots Archives As Places Of Remembrance, Emma R. Johansen, Emma R. Johansen 2021 University of Louisville

Y’All Means All: The Southern Queer Experience And Grassroots Archives As Places Of Remembrance, Emma R. Johansen, Emma R. Johansen

The Cardinal Edge

While the burgeoning field of queer history grows in academic prominence and scholarship, southern queer identities and histories are left in the gaps of this trailblazing research. As a segment of a larger senior honors thesis on gay press in Kentucky and the broader American South, this brief research report will specifically examine queer rurality, visibility, and space in the archive. This report also aims to highlight the political and sociological importance of remembering, studying, and teaching queer heritage, especially in the rural American South. This report argues that the complexities of southern queer histories are especially felt in the …


Community Activation: Response To Aids In Chicago, Braydon Conell 2021 University of Nebraska at Kearney

Community Activation: Response To Aids In Chicago, Braydon Conell

Graduate Review

The response to the AIDS epidemic in Chicago shows continuity with the national trend of fighting ignorance. In the 1980s, Chicago emerged as a hotspot of gay life, positioned between watershed moments in New York and San Francisco, crafting an opportunity to forge a powerful, accepting community within the city through community responsiveness, educational initiatives and political activism. Chicago is more representative of the typical American city and is why this study is centered here. Chicagoans provided their own actions in response to city and county government inaction. Medical activism by gay doctors at the Cook County Hospital, for example, …


“What Sort Of Man Reads Playboy?”: Gender, Heterosexuality, And Reader Letters In Playboy Magazine, 1953-1963, Kess Carpenter 2021 University of Windsor

“What Sort Of Man Reads Playboy?”: Gender, Heterosexuality, And Reader Letters In Playboy Magazine, 1953-1963, Kess Carpenter

Major Papers

Existing Playboy scholarship overlooks the significance of magazine’s audience outside of the bachelor subculture it fathered in the 1950s. In fact, consumers fitting Playboy’s desired readership of white, financially affluent, single men formed only a small percentage of its actual subscribers. This study makes evident that students, soldiers, sailors, military servicemen, middle- and working- class men, both single and married, as well as women, made up most of its readership. To date, no historical study has been conducted of reader letters to Playboy, which reveal the magazine’s significance to this audience.

This paper argues that postwar men used Playboy as …


Going With The Flow: The Evolution Of Menstrual Education In England, 1850 To 1930, Madeline M. Hiltz 2021 The University of Western Ontario

Going With The Flow: The Evolution Of Menstrual Education In England, 1850 To 1930, Madeline M. Hiltz

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

The history of menstrual education has typically been overshadowed by other aspects of Victorian sexuality and female reproductive history. This thesis seeks to shine a light on menstrual education in the mid-nineteenth and early-twentieth century in England. More specifically, it examines the role that male and female physicians played producing and disseminating information on menstrual management. Despite a scarcity of documented experiences outlining the reality of menstrual education and menstrual management, an analysis of surviving literary materials, including health advice literature, periodicals and magazines, medical studies, new letters and pamphlets, help indicate cultural conceptions of menstruation. It becomes clear that …


The Inconspicuous Lives Of Dr. Susan Smith Mckinney Steward And Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, Alexandra W. Bogdanovich 2021 CUNY Hunter College

The Inconspicuous Lives Of Dr. Susan Smith Mckinney Steward And Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, Alexandra W. Bogdanovich

Theses and Dissertations

This paper examines trailblazing American female doctors of the nineteenth century in New York. Through the lives of Dr. Susan Smith Mckinney Steward, who is black, and Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, who is white, this analysis tries to understand what motivated these women and how they succeeded in spite of the confines of women’s prescriptive role in nineteenth-century America.


The Virago Paradigm Of Female Sanctity: Constructing The Masculine Woman In Medieval Christianity, Angela Bolen 2021 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Virago Paradigm Of Female Sanctity: Constructing The Masculine Woman In Medieval Christianity, Angela Bolen

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

The Latin word virago, in its simplest definition, means “a man-like, warrior woman.” For Christian men and women in the Patristic era and the central Middle Ages, the virago represented a woman who denied all biological characteristics of her womanhood, fiercely protected her virginity, and fully embodied the virtues of Christian masculinity. The virago paradigm of female sanctity, a creation of male writers, reconciled a pervasive fear of the female sex with an obvious admiration for holy women. Additionally, the virago model maintained the supremacy of masculine virtues, upheld a patriarchal hierarchy, and created a metaphorical space that validated …


The Evolution Of The “We Can Do It” Poster And American Feminist Movements, Reina Aguirre 2021 San Jose State University

The Evolution Of The “We Can Do It” Poster And American Feminist Movements, Reina Aguirre

McNair Research Journal SJSU

World War II created mass destruction and economic distress but was also responsible for creating new opportunities for women. The war had torn families apart and had altered family dynamics. The high demands of the wartime economy called for a reevaluation of American women’s roles in society. In 1942, Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller was hired by the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee to create a range of propaganda posters to encourage women to join the war effort.[1] The most iconic was christened “Rosie the Riveter” and further popularized by Norman Rockwell. These images exemplified how the government …


Medieval Infertility: Treatments, Cures, And Consequences, Zia Simpson 2021 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Medieval Infertility: Treatments, Cures, And Consequences, Zia Simpson

The Forum: Journal of History

Since the first civilizations emerged, reproductive ability has been one of the most prominent elements in assessing a woman’s value to society. Other characteristics such as beauty, intelligence, and wealth may have been granted comparable consequence, but those are arbitrary and improvable. Fertility is genetic, and for centuries it was beyond human control. Among the medieval European nobility, fertility held even greater power. The absence of an heir could, either directly or indirectly, bring about war, economic depression, and social disorder. Catholicism provided a refuge by allowing barren women to retain their hopes, while simultaneously enriching Rome’s coffers. Other women …


Ironic Transitions: Conflicting Results Of Greater Visibility During The Last 20 Years Of Transgender Experience In The United States, Brianna M. Pace 2021 St. Cloud State University

Ironic Transitions: Conflicting Results Of Greater Visibility During The Last 20 Years Of Transgender Experience In The United States, Brianna M. Pace

SCSU Journal of Student Scholarship

The spread of internet and social media access in the 21st century led to increased visibility of transgender persons in the U.S., especially within such popular culture venues as art, music, literature, television, and movies. The rapid communication facilitated by the internet also allowed for the formation of larger, more widespread trans communities. This foundation of visibility and community association enabled transgender persons to achieve many breakthroughs in health and mental health care, as well as in anti-discrimination laws. At the same time, this visibility sparked a countermovement against the rights of transgender persons, paralleling a year-by-year increase in …


When I Was A Young Girl: Gender And Race In The Life Archives Of Criminal Transportation, Nick Townsend 2021 Portland State University

When I Was A Young Girl: Gender And Race In The Life Archives Of Criminal Transportation, Nick Townsend

University Honors Theses

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century, the carceral system in England shifted away from corporal punishment and moved towards containing and policing those deemed criminal in different ways. One notable way was transportation, the practice of moving convicts out of the imperial core into a colony. This practice became a way to remove "lesser" populations from England and regulate social behavior while also expanding the British Empire and allowed convicts a new purpose in expanding the carceral state. This developed alongside the broader trends of racialization and colonization in the British Empire, which drew a global color line separating "white" …


The Ill-Treatment Of Their Countrywoman: Liberated African Women, Violence, And Power In Tortola, 1807-1834, Arianna Browne 2021 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

The Ill-Treatment Of Their Countrywoman: Liberated African Women, Violence, And Power In Tortola, 1807-1834, Arianna Browne

Master's Theses

In 1807, Parliament passed an Act to abolish the slave trade, leading to the Royal Navy’s campaign of policing international waters and seizing ships suspected of illegal trading. As the Royal Navy captured slave ships as prizes of war and condemned enslaved Africans to Vice-Admiralty courts, formerly enslaved Africans became “captured negroes” or “liberated Africans,” making the subjects in the British colonies. This work, which takes a microhistorical approach to investigate the everyday experiences of liberated Africans in Tortola during the early nineteenth century, focuses on the violent conditions of liberated African women, demonstrating that abolition consisted of violent contradictions …


“The History Of Every Life … Is Important”: Lydia Olsson, Growing Up Swedish American, And Midwestern Girlhood At The Turn Of The Century, Rebecca Hopman 2021 Sarah Lawrence College

“The History Of Every Life … Is Important”: Lydia Olsson, Growing Up Swedish American, And Midwestern Girlhood At The Turn Of The Century, Rebecca Hopman

Women's History Theses

Our knowledge of American girls at the turn of the twentieth century is incomplete. Scholarship on Victorian American girlhood most frequently draws evidence from the papers of privileged young white women from native-born Northeastern families. But their lives only tell part of the story. We must expand our scope to truly understand the options and opportunities for girls as they came of age in this period. This thesis explores the life of Lydia Olsson, a Swedish- American girl born to immigrant parents and living in a Midwestern city. She was one of a growing number of young women participating in …


Land Lines: Modes Of Communication In Kentucky's Queer Past And Present., Emma R. Johansen 2021 University of Louisville

Land Lines: Modes Of Communication In Kentucky's Queer Past And Present., Emma R. Johansen

College of Arts & Sciences Senior Honors Theses

As the queer historical discipline grows in reach, prominence, and scholarship, southern queer histories are on the tail end of this growing academic attention. Academic historians, digital humanists, and public historians alike have neglected Kentucky’s rich queer history in academic circles. This thesis aims to mend this gap in historic interpretation through research in Kentucky gay press, television, radio, and their effect on Kentucky’s queer organizing. Through extensive primary research in the Williams-Nichols archive, and secondary sources on the women in print movement, queer rurality, and gay media studies, this thesis measures the ways Kentucky queer communities have correlated with …


A Voice From The Convent: Arcangela Tarabotti In Tridentine Venice, Zoe Connell 2021 William & Mary

A Voice From The Convent: Arcangela Tarabotti In Tridentine Venice, Zoe Connell

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 1617, at the tender age of 13, Arcangela Tarabotti was forced by her family to leave their home and enter the Venetian convent of Sant’Anna. As an advocate not only of gender equality, but female superiority, Tarabotti fought on behalf of women who suffered under Venice’s patriarchal institutions that robbed them of their liberty. This study aims to examine the intersection between the time and space in which Tarabotti lived and her experiences as expressed through her writings. In this thesis, I will examine the manner in which the contents of her writings — emotions, tone, self-image, and beliefs …


The Female Kirk: Women's Participation In The Early Scottish Presbyterian Church, Lydia Mackey 2021 College of William and Mary

The Female Kirk: Women's Participation In The Early Scottish Presbyterian Church, Lydia Mackey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Presbyterianism’s founder, John Knox, wrote his infamous The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women in 1558 arguing against female monarchs. Despite early modern Presbyterianism’s restriction of women’s formal religious roles, women used often conflicting rhetoric from the pulpit to negotiate a degree of power and autonomy. Rather than only being passive members of the Presbyterian Church, women often played an active role in the development and expansion of Presbyterianism between 1550 and 1690. This thesis will demonstrate how a study of women’s interactions with the Presbyterian Church outside of the kirk sessions, namely in their …


Making Earth, Making Home: Technoscientific Citizenship And Ecological Domesticity In An Age Of Limits, Emma Schroeder 2021 University of Maine

Making Earth, Making Home: Technoscientific Citizenship And Ecological Domesticity In An Age Of Limits, Emma Schroeder

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In the post-WWII era, concerns over Earth’s finite resources and technology’s destructive capacity shaped ideas of a global environment. This dissertation focuses on transnational grassroots social movements that attempted to find solutions to earthly vulnerability. It looks at women’s nuclear disarmament campaigns in the early 1960s, the Appropriate Technology movement of the 1970s, Canada’s conserver society program, and the emergence of feminist technoscientific critique and ecological activism in the early 1980s. In each case study, it shows how the ability to critique and produce technoscientific knowledge expanded women’s political identities, what I call technoscientific citizenship. Simultaneously, these groups promoted ecological …


Stranger Compass Of The Stage: Difference And Desire In Early Modern City Comedy, Catherine Tisdale 2021 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Stranger Compass Of The Stage: Difference And Desire In Early Modern City Comedy, Catherine Tisdale

Doctoral Dissertations

In periods of social and political upheaval like ours, it is more important than ever to interrogate constructions of identity and difference and to understand the histories of alterity that separate us from one another. Stranger Compass of the Stage: Difference and Desire in Early Modern City Drama reimagines the cultural and social effect of alien, foreign, and stranger characters on the early modern stage and re-envisions how these characters contribute to, alter, and imaginatively build new epistemologies for understanding difference in early modern London. Resisting the field’s current critical inclination toward English identity formation, this project works intersectionally to …


Uprooting Medievalism: Ya And The Future Of Fantasy, Zoe Phillips 2021 Suffolk University

Uprooting Medievalism: Ya And The Future Of Fantasy, Zoe Phillips

Undergraduate Theses and Capstone Projects

This thesis looks at the development of the young adult neo-medieval fantasy genre, measuring famous works from the Medieval period against works such as Tolkien's, to examine the impact of female protagonists and female authors on the genre and readers alike as neo-medieval fantasy continues to gain in popularity. Works examined include: Beowulf, Lanval, Le Roman de Silence, The Hobbit, Uprooted, and The Hero and the Crown.


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