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Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich 2012 Fordham University

Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich

Babette Babich

To explore the ethical and political role of life-sized bronzes in ancient Greece, as Pliny and others report between 3,000 and 73,000 such statues in a city like Rhodes, this article asks what these bronzes looked like. Using the resources of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection, as well as a review of the nature of bronze and casting techniques, it is argued that the ancient Greeks encountered such statues as images of themselves in agonistic tension in dynamic and political fashion. The Greek saw, and at the same time felt himself regarded by, the statue not as he believed the ...


White Snake, Black Snake Folk Narrative Meets Master Narrative In Qing Dynasty Sichuanese Cross-Stitch Medallions, Cory Willmott 2012 Southern Illinois University

White Snake, Black Snake Folk Narrative Meets Master Narrative In Qing Dynasty Sichuanese Cross-Stitch Medallions, Cory Willmott

Cory A. Willmott

The cross-stitch medallion in figure 1 was collected by my grandmother, Katherine Willmott, in the early 1920s when she was a missionary in Renshow, Sichuan Province, West China. Many years after I inherited it, I learned that it depicts a folk narrative called “White Snake; Black Snake” that was traditionally performed both on stage in the legitimate theaters and in Chinese shadow puppet dramas (Highbaugh n/d:6).

The story may be summarized as follows: There were two female snakes, White Snake and Black Snake, who were inseparable friends. They both changed into beautiful young women. White Snake got married ...


The Gods Come For Play: Visualizing The Divine In Balinese Theatre, Chandler Payne, John Park 2012 Pepperdine University

The Gods Come For Play: Visualizing The Divine In Balinese Theatre, Chandler Payne, John Park

All Undergraduate Student Research

Playwrights, practitioners, and art historians have been shocked and inspired by Balinese theatre time and time again because it reveals the extent of devotion the Balinese have for their religion. Although many researchers have investigated the functionality through the performance aspect of the play, there is a lack of published research devoted how the functionality of the ritual and play are influenced by the physical aesthetic properties of the Barong and Rangda mask. The theatrical aspects are to be considered through investigating these masks in relation to the temple space of the Taman Aran. By investigating the aesthetic properties of ...


Haniwa: Constructing A Sacred Place For The Afterlife, Ashlyn Rawls, Clarissa Aliberti, Rylee Baisden 2012 Pepperdine University

Haniwa: Constructing A Sacred Place For The Afterlife, Ashlyn Rawls, Clarissa Aliberti, Rylee Baisden

All Undergraduate Student Research

Haniwa are small, hollow terracotta statues that were placed on aristocratic graves during the Kofun period of Japan, which translates as “old tomb.” These unique figures were rather simple at the beginning of their creation, but over time they became increasingly complex taking the forms of people, animals, and other objects. These fascinating funerary objects serve a greater purpose than just ordinary tomb decorations. The haniwa tie into the Confucianist tradition of being made to be used and to protect the spirits of the dead. Influenced by Confucian tradition, in which “filial piety” is recognized as a high level of ...


Torii And Water: A Gateway To Shinto, Hannah Imson, Amy Kahng, Victoria Lekson 2012 Pepperdine University

Torii And Water: A Gateway To Shinto, Hannah Imson, Amy Kahng, Victoria Lekson

All Undergraduate Student Research

Water symbolizes purity in the Shinto religion and thus holds utmost importance as a method of religious purification. Additionally, scholars and worshippers recognize the role of torii as gateways to the kami, or deities of nature. However, there has not been a documented survey of the relationship between torii and their placement in water, a relationship we feel is significant in understanding Shintoism. We intend to bridge this gap in scholarship by displaying the prevalence of torii placed in or right next to water. We will explore torii from various parts of the world as well as different time periods ...


Jayavarmin Vii: Achieving Kingship, Ross Seeman, McKay Whitacre, David Oppenheim 2012 Pepperdine University

Jayavarmin Vii: Achieving Kingship, Ross Seeman, Mckay Whitacre, David Oppenheim

All Undergraduate Student Research

Jayavarmin VII (r. 1181-1218) exemplifies the nature of achieving divine kingship through his life achievements modeled after the life of Buddha. He was viewed by many as a divine-like figure, through his acts of philanthropy and good deeds for the city. Through this philosophy, Jayavarmin VII facilitated the construction of hospitals, several roads and rest houses. The height of Jayavarmin’s reign was during the construction of the Bayon Temple. By this time, Jayavarmin VII believed he had completed his journey to kingship. This is shown through the massive faces carved in the temple representing either Jayavarmin or Buddha himself ...


Ganesha: A Study Of Personal Worship To A Personal God, Madeline Taylor, Katherine Garner, Naomi Purnell 2012 Pepperdine University

Ganesha: A Study Of Personal Worship To A Personal God, Madeline Taylor, Katherine Garner, Naomi Purnell

All Undergraduate Student Research

Hindu devotees worship Ganesha when they are beginning a new phase or faces obstacles in their lives. In investigating the personal devotion of Hindu gods in India, we have found that there is a difference between the ways a Hindu worships the god Ganesha at a public shrine than in their own home. The main difference in worship style is that in the home, the worshiper acts as his or her own priest. There is room for greater interpretation in worship style and offerings made to the deity. Since our topic is personal devotion, we were drawn to the private ...


Mapping Shikoku: Picturing Buddhist Pilgrimage In Contemporary Japan, Anna Maria Ortiz, Chloe Walton, Cody McManus 2012 Pepperdine University

Mapping Shikoku: Picturing Buddhist Pilgrimage In Contemporary Japan, Anna Maria Ortiz, Chloe Walton, Cody Mcmanus

All Undergraduate Student Research

In this research, we will address this question: Do the modern methods of practicing the Shikoku Pilgrimage stay true to the ancient intent of the pilgrimage? People who embark on the journey to each of the 88 Shikoku temple sites do so to escape to another world of peace and tranquility that they cannot obtain in their regular daily lives. Unfortunately, there is a large gap in scholarship on the topic of the Shikoku Buddhist Pilgrimage: little is written about how the shift from ancient to modern practices of the pilgrimage has changed pilgrims’ experiences. Little is known by Westerners ...


Teaching With Twitter: A Collaborative Experiment Using Twitter In The Classroom, Brian Vetruba, Makiba Foster, Kristina Kleutghen 2012 Washington University in St Louis

Teaching With Twitter: A Collaborative Experiment Using Twitter In The Classroom, Brian Vetruba, Makiba Foster, Kristina Kleutghen

University Libraries Presentations

In a world where social media are becoming part of our daily existence in a variety of ways, Twitter is making inroads as a method for engaging students. In fact, a recent study published in the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning found a higher rate of student engagement with faculty and course material--as well as better grades--among students who were Twitter users. Kristina, Makiba, and Brian will describe a collaborative experiment in integrating Twitter into two Art History courses in the fall of 2011. They will share lessons learned and engage participants in a discussion of best practices for using ...


Confucius Institute Fall 2012 Publication (Report), Dr. Wei-ping Pan Director 2012 Western Kentucky Univeristy

Confucius Institute Fall 2012 Publication (Report), Dr. Wei-Ping Pan Director

The Confucius Institute Publications

No abstract provided.


"Biography: Details Lacking": Reimaging Torii Kiyotsune As A Kibyōshi Artist, Jason L. Heuer 2012 University of Massachusetts Amherst

"Biography: Details Lacking": Reimaging Torii Kiyotsune As A Kibyōshi Artist, Jason L. Heuer

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

In the late 18th century an artist named Torii Kiyotsune 鳥居清経inherited and mastered a style of ukiyo-e that was soon to go out of fashion. Few of his prints survived and he left little impression on Japanese art history, despite his association with such a prominent school as the Torii. Yet the very association may have contributed to his obscurity. The assumption that Kiyotsune was primarily an ukiyo-e artist led to the overshadowing of his work in another arena, popular books known as kusazōshi. In fact he was quite prolific in that medium, illustrating over 130 kibyōshi, as ...


The Paradox Of Gender Among West China Missionary Collectors, 1920-1950, Cory Willmott 2011 Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

The Paradox Of Gender Among West China Missionary Collectors, 1920-1950, Cory Willmott

Cory A. Willmott

During the turbulent years between the Chinese nationalist revolution of 1911 and the communist victory of 1949, a group of missionaries lived and worked in West China whose social gospel theologies led to unusual identification with Chinese. Among the regular social actors in their lives were itinerant “curio men” who, amidst the chaos of feuding warlords, gathered up the heirlooms of the deposed Manchurian aristocracy and offered these wares for sale on the quiet and orderly verandahs of the mansions inside the missionary compounds of West China Union University. Although missionary men and women often collected the same types of ...


Korean Mask-Dance And Aristotle's Poetics, Teayong Pakr 2011 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Korean Mask-Dance And Aristotle's Poetics, Teayong Pakr

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Korean mask-dance is the traditional theatre of Korea. It was formerly the country's most well-known form of drama among traditional theatrical entertainments. This study explores the theatrical structure of Korean mask-dance as well as its historical background.

The rise of Korean mask-dance may be traced back to the shamanistic village ritual which gradually became similar to the extant form after absorbing aspects of the Buddhism festival through the Goryeo Dynasty, which lasted from 918-1392). During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the mask-dance had acquired its basic form with aspects of professional theatrical entertainment. The mask-dances have been performed during traditional ...


Confucius Institute Fall 2011 Publication (Report), Dr. Wei-ping Pan Director 2011 Western Kentucky University

Confucius Institute Fall 2011 Publication (Report), Dr. Wei-Ping Pan Director

The Confucius Institute Publications

No abstract provided.


Divan Japonais: Toulouse-Lautrec And Japanese Art, Eva Raepple 2011 College of DuPage

Divan Japonais: Toulouse-Lautrec And Japanese Art, Eva Raepple

Eva Maria Raepple

The French nineteenth century artists Henry Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) is known for his distinctive style and bold character portraits of the theatrical scene of the gaslight era in Paris. The paper examines some of the formative influences of eighteenth century Japanese art on the development of visual characters, with specific focus on a lithograph entitled Divan Japonais. Alluding to the refined representation of Japanese courtesans, subtle nuanced reminiscences to an ideal of elegance create an allusion to highly respected courtesans in the Japanese ‘Green Houses’ of the Asian Yoshiwara the famous “Good Luck Meadow” in Edo, present day Tokyo. I argue ...


Ink Painting Of Orchids Among The Literati In The Qing And Choson Dynasties, Herin Jung 2011 Seoul National University

Ink Painting Of Orchids Among The Literati In The Qing And Choson Dynasties, Herin Jung

Journal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective

Genres of cultural products have flowed in and out between China and Korea for thousands of years. It is well known that among these genres, the orchid was one of the most elegant subjects in ink painting. Although research has shown which types and how many works have been exchanged between the two countries, the ideas beneath the works deserve greater attention. The works of Kim Chong-hui (1786-1856) in the late Choson Dynasty are particularly valuable. Well known as a great calligrapher and erudite scholar, Kim profoundly explored art history and theory and was especially knowledgeable about successive painters of ...


Confucius Institute Spring 2011 (Report), Dr. Wei-ping Pan Director 2011 Western Kentucky Univeristy

Confucius Institute Spring 2011 (Report), Dr. Wei-Ping Pan Director

The Confucius Institute Publications

No abstract provided.


A Unique And Mysterious Shahnama Miniature, Sarah Mirseyedi 2011 Hollins University

A Unique And Mysterious Shahnama Miniature, Sarah Mirseyedi

Undergraduate Research Awards

An examination of a 16th-century Persian manuscript page from the Shahnama. The PDF includes the author's entry submission essay for the Undergraduate Research Awards.


Wang Yuanqi And The Orthodoxy Of Self-Reflection In Early Qing Landscape Painting, Shen Wang 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Wang Yuanqi And The Orthodoxy Of Self-Reflection In Early Qing Landscape Painting, Shen Wang

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation explores the life and art of Wang Yuanqi (1642-1715), one of the most influential literati artists of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). As a representative of the so-called “Orthodox Painting School,” Wang considered himself the heir to the genuine thousand-year-old tradition of Chinese painting. Throughout his lifetime, he made every effort to establish and consolidate the authority of his school of painting. Since his early years, he had been trained as a traditional Chinese literatus. Under the direct supervision of his grandfather, he practiced landscape paintings in the style of ancient masters, especially that of the Yuan literati painter ...


Sexuality, Exoticism, And Iconoclasm In The Media Age: The Strange Case Of The Buddha Bikini, James Shields 2010 Bucknell University

Sexuality, Exoticism, And Iconoclasm In The Media Age: The Strange Case Of The Buddha Bikini, James Shields

Faculty Contributions to Books

No abstract provided.


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