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Some Thoughts On Precious: Based On The Novel Push By Sapphire, David Hennessee 2010 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Some Thoughts On Precious: Based On The Novel Push By Sapphire, David Hennessee

Moebius

No abstract provided.


Neither A Wife Nor A Whore: Deconstructing Feminine Icons In Catherine Breillat's Une Vieille Maîtresse, Douglas Keesey 2010 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Neither A Wife Nor A Whore: Deconstructing Feminine Icons In Catherine Breillat's Une Vieille Maîtresse, Douglas Keesey

English

This article undertakes a close reading of Catherine Breillat’s recent film Une vieille maîtresse (2007) to show why this, her first heritage film, is nevertheless strongly relevant to the gender politics of today. The author argues that Breillat’s cinematic deconstruction of differences between women is designed to undo the polarising effect of patriarchal representations of women as madonnas or whores — media images still prevalent even in these days of mixité and parité. Despite a tendency on the part of some reviewers to take the film’s gender images at face value, the author argues that Breillat’s interest ...


Dickinson And Smith: Years Apart But Not So Different, Nicole Day 2010 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Dickinson And Smith: Years Apart But Not So Different, Nicole Day

English

Even though there were sixteen years separating them, Stevie Smith and Emily Dickinson had much in common. They both use death as a theme to explore and mock life. Their small poems have a lot to say about life and death.


The Power Of Pain Gender, Sadism, And Masochism In The Works Of Wilkie Collins, Helen Doyle 2010 Bridgewater State University

The Power Of Pain Gender, Sadism, And Masochism In The Works Of Wilkie Collins, Helen Doyle

Undergraduate Review

In his novels No Name (1862) and Armadale (1866), Wilkie Collins explores the social role of women in Victorian England, a patriarchal society that forced women either to submit to the control of a man or rebel at the expense of their own health and sanity. Even though some of his characters eventually marry, thus conforming to social expectations for women, I argue that his portrayal of female characters was subversive. In quests for control over their own lives, Magdalen Vanstone and Lydia Gwilt turn to masochism and sadism, practices which eventually lead to identity loss and self-destruction. Collins suggests ...


Intellectual Restlessness: Inquiry And Analysis, Lian Hee Wee, Linda Uyechi 2010 Hong Kong Baptist University

Intellectual Restlessness: Inquiry And Analysis, Lian Hee Wee, Linda Uyechi

HKBU Staff Publication

No abstract provided.


The Constitution Of Toussaint, Michael J. Drexler, Ed White 2010 Bucknell University

The Constitution Of Toussaint, Michael J. Drexler, Ed White

Faculty Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Southern Encounters In The City: Reconfiguring The South From The Liminal Space, Eveljn Ferraro 2010 Santa Clara Univeristy

Southern Encounters In The City: Reconfiguring The South From The Liminal Space, Eveljn Ferraro

Modern Languages & Literature

In Il pensiero meridiano, sociologist Franco Cassano claims that the cultural autonomy of the South hinges upon a radical redefinition of the relationship between South and North. Dominant representations of the South as a “not-yet North”1 (Cassano viii), always imperfectly mimicking a more advanced North, found themselves on the idea of a linear transition from backwardness to development where the differences are often reduced to a matter of time. If Gramsci, in The Southern Question, deconstructed the Italian North/South binarism by suggesting potential alliances among non-dominant groups (namely, Northern workers and Southern peasants), Cassano proposes a spatial rethinking ...


“The Base, Cursed Thing”: Panther Attacks, Ecotones, And Antebellum American Fiction, Matthew Sivils 2010 Iowa State University

“The Base, Cursed Thing”: Panther Attacks, Ecotones, And Antebellum American Fiction, Matthew Sivils

English Publications

The panther attack scenes found in the fiction of Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810), James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), and Harriet Prescott Spofford (1835-1921) portray these animals as literary monsters indicative of a developing American environmental anxiety. Drawing on a selection of recent critical studies dealing with both antebellum American fiction and ecocriticism, I suggest that these scenes reveal, especially through their depiction of panther attacks in what ecologists now refer to as anthropogenic ecotones (human-made environmental edges), the beginnings of an American cultural recognition of environmental degradation. Ultimately these panther attack scenes prefigure an American environmental ethic, revealing an instructive early ...


Someday, When I Lived In Frost, Joseph Edmund Brekke 2010 Iowa State University

Someday, When I Lived In Frost, Joseph Edmund Brekke

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Someday, when I lived in Frost is a collection of personal essays about a young man growing up in Southern Minnesota in the 1980s and '90s. Part memoir, part family history, the essays explore the complex relationships between family members living 100 miles and a world apart. Set primarily in the author's hometown of Rochester and Frost, the small farming community where his parents were born and raised, the essays chronicle the author's attempts to connect his rural roots with his suburban, liberal arts college experience. Interviews with relatives offer oral histories of Depression-era folk music in northern ...


Hunger, History, And The Shape Of Awkward Questions: Reading Sarah Klassen’S Simone Weil As Mennonite Text, Tanis MacDonald 2010 Wilfrid Laurier University

Hunger, History, And The Shape Of Awkward Questions: Reading Sarah Klassen’S Simone Weil As Mennonite Text, Tanis Macdonald

English and Film Studies Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


“She Brings Everything To A Grindstone”: Sympathy And The Paid Female Companion's Critical Work In David Copperfield, Lauren Hoffer 2010 University of South Carolina - Beaufort

“She Brings Everything To A Grindstone”: Sympathy And The Paid Female Companion's Critical Work In David Copperfield, Lauren Hoffer

Faculty Publications

In David Copperfield, Charles Dickens employs Rosa Dartle, Mrs. Steerforth's paid female companion, as an agent of his narrative. The companion in Victorian literature is an ambiguous figure whose status as a genteel insider and outsider within the domestic circle makes her a unique vehicle for the disclosure of important information the narrative cannot otherwise convey. Companions in the nineteenth century were hired to provide company, amusement, and, most important, a sympathetic ear for their mistresses' confidences. But, as Dickens and other Victorian writers show, this purchased sympathy-for-hire can be corrupted and distorted to serve the companion's own ...


Truant Teaching: A Conversation With Isamu Fukui, Sara L. Schwebel 2010 University of South Carolina - Columbia

Truant Teaching: A Conversation With Isamu Fukui, Sara L. Schwebel

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Pencil, The Pin, The Table, The Bowl And The Wheel, Valerie Allen 2010 CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice

The Pencil, The Pin, The Table, The Bowl And The Wheel, Valerie Allen

Publications and Research

The commodity created under global capitalism originates from everywhere and seems to have been made by everyone. Endlessly fungible, it is also endlessly divisible. Analysis of the commodity reveals the indissoluble link between commodification and technologization. Although the medieval commodity is a very different kind of object, not issuing from an economy dedicated to commodity production, and being produced more regionally, the link between production and technology applies to the Middle Ages as much as it does to now. Medieval technology, in particular road-building, is commonly regarded as a regression in comparison to Roman engineering skills. I argue, however, for ...


John Cleave's Weekly Police Gazette (1834-6), Francis Place, And The Pragmatics Of The Unstamped Press, Edward Jacobs 2010 Old Dominion University

John Cleave's Weekly Police Gazette (1834-6), Francis Place, And The Pragmatics Of The Unstamped Press, Edward Jacobs

English Faculty Publications

John Cleave (c.1790-c.1847) was the editor and publisher of, among other works, Cleaves Weekly Police Gazette (1834-6; hereafter WPG), which was by most accounts the best-selling unstamped newspaper of the so-called "War of the Unstamped Press" in the 1830s, one of the first unstamped papers to adopt a broadsheet format like stamped papers, and one of the first to mix political news with coverage of non-political events like sensational crimes and strange occurrences. As Joel Wiener and Patricia Hollis note, less is known about Cleave than about most of the other major figures in the unstamped movement, like ...


"Passing" And Identity: A Literary Perspective On Gender And Sexual Diversity, Pamela L. Caughie 2010 Loyola University Chicago

"Passing" And Identity: A Literary Perspective On Gender And Sexual Diversity, Pamela L. Caughie

English: Faculty Publications and Other Works

For the literary scholar as for the gender theorist, truth is what makes sense in terms of a particular narrative. What is true is not simply that which corresponds to the real; rather, what is true is what is accepted as being true within a given discourse, institution, or discipline. Unlike biologists, literary scholars don’t ask “Is it true?” but “How is it true?” This question requires interrogating the normative standards by which claims of truth, authenticity, and legitimacy are established. And that means learning to read people the way many of us have learned to read literature, taking ...


Audible Identities: Passing And Sound Technologies, Pamela L. Caughie 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Audible Identities: Passing And Sound Technologies, Pamela L. Caughie

English: Faculty Publications and Other Works

At the March 2008 conference of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections held at Stanford University, audio historians played what they claim is the first recording of the human voice. It is a presumably female voice singing Au clair de la lune, though the distorted quality of the 10-second recording renders the words no more decipherable than the singer’s gender to an untutored ear. The recording was made in Paris in April 1860 on a ‘phonautograph’ invented by Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville (aka Leon Scott), nearly 20 years before Thomas Edison patented the phonograph in 1877. Sound waves captured ...


Virginia Woolf: Radio, Gramophone, And Broadcasting, Pamela L. Caughie 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Virginia Woolf: Radio, Gramophone, And Broadcasting, Pamela L. Caughie

English: Faculty Publications and Other Works

No abstract provided.


Understanding Genre Through The Lens Of Advocacy: The Rhetorical Work Of The Victim Impact Statement, Amy D. Propen, Mary Lay Schuster 2010 York College of Pennsylvania

Understanding Genre Through The Lens Of Advocacy: The Rhetorical Work Of The Victim Impact Statement, Amy D. Propen, Mary Lay Schuster

English

Through interviews with judges and victim advocates, courtroom observations, and rhetorical analyses of victims’ reactions to proposed sentences, the authors examine the features that judges and advocates think make victims’ arguments persuasive. The authors conclude that this genre, recently imposed upon the court, functions as a mediating device through which advocates push for collective change, particularly for judicial acceptance of personal and emotional appeals. This study understands genres as responsive to changes within the activity systems in which they work and extends knowledge about genres that function as advocacy tools within internal institutional systems.


J. Graham Brown School, Jessie Magee 2010 Western Kentucky University

J. Graham Brown School, Jessie Magee

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Couches. Creativity. Teachers. Thinkers. Call it the Hippie School. Or call it the Brown School – a self-directed learning magnet school in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. Since 1972, the J. Graham Brown School has educated children from elementary through high school beyond the traditional education model to face the world with a different perspective from the norm: one of acceptance, of the individual, of the cohesion of our differences. Students mentor each other and form open, real relationships with teachers to develop a unique, whole understanding of the world – all the while trying to shed the image of a school full of ...


Inventions, Christopher Litman 2010 CUNY City College

Inventions, Christopher Litman

Dissertations and Theses

No abstract provided.


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