Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Literature in English, North America Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,017 Full-Text Articles 2,520 Authors 2,010,769 Downloads 197 Institutions

All Articles in Literature in English, North America

Faceted Search

4,017 full-text articles. Page 92 of 95.

Moral Absolutism In Arthur Miller's The Crucible, Jennifer Rodgers 2010 The College at Brockport

Moral Absolutism In Arthur Miller's The Crucible, Jennifer Rodgers

English Master’s Theses

The Crucible, by Arthur Miller, explores several complex and trans-historic topics, many of which relate to the playwright's experiences during the McCarthy era. Miller asks his audience to value independent and personal truths, which he defines as more morally right and good than social truths. This is because, in the playwright's mind, social truths are often manipulated and exploited to gain a desired personal result regardless of how they affect other's lives. In order to illuminate this point, he repeatedly plays with the concepts of truth and lies, confession and accusation, as well as public and private ...


Hues, Tresses, And Dresses: Examining The Relation Of Body Image, Hair, And Clothes To Female Identity In Their Eyes Were Watching God And I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Alisha Priolo Castaneda 2010 Liberty University

Hues, Tresses, And Dresses: Examining The Relation Of Body Image, Hair, And Clothes To Female Identity In Their Eyes Were Watching God And I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Alisha Priolo Castaneda

Masters Theses

Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings convey powerful relations between body image, hair, and clothes. Because a proper understanding of the theory of womanism provides a basis for comprehending the African American female's relation to herself and the world around her, a working definition and description of the term and its general significance to African American critical theory is provided in chapter two. The third chapter focuses on the general topic of body image in relation to black female identity and includes a more specific ...


Anxiety De La Historia: Understanding The Roots Of Spanglish In The Texts Of Junot Díaz, Kelsey A. Shanesy 2010 Macalester College

Anxiety De La Historia: Understanding The Roots Of Spanglish In The Texts Of Junot Díaz, Kelsey A. Shanesy

English Honors Projects

In exploring Junot Díaz’s use of Spanglish, I propose that Díaz is driven by the anxiety of history—a phenomenon similar to the anxiety of influence, as articulated by Harold Bloom, but which focuses on the role of the Latino minority in this postmodern moment. I compare Díaz’s texts to Piri Thomas’s autobiography Down These Mean Streets, one of the original texts to utilize Spanglish, and Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed, a satirical novel about minority culture. Díaz’s vision of a future, Spanglish-speaking America is revealed to be the ultimate outcome of the anxiety of history ...


Compte Rendu: Laurence Mall, 'Émile' Ou Les Figures De La Fiction, Servanne Woodward 2010 Selected Works

Compte Rendu: Laurence Mall, 'Émile' Ou Les Figures De La Fiction, Servanne Woodward

Servanne Woodward

No abstract provided.


Staring Down The Barrel Of A Shotgun, Jill Marie Alexander 2010 Morehead State University

Staring Down The Barrel Of A Shotgun, Jill Marie Alexander

Morehead State Theses and Dissertations

A thesis presented to the faculty of the Caudill College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Morehead State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts by Jill Marie Alexander on April 8, 2010.


Female Liberation In The Awakening And “The Yellow Wall-Paper”, Kevin Chen '10 2010 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Female Liberation In The Awakening And “The Yellow Wall-Paper”, Kevin Chen '10

2010 Spring Semester

Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wall-Paper,” both initially published in 1899, present strikingly similar stories of the plight of women in society. Both texts adopt a markedly feminist bias, narrated from the point of view of a female protagonist who wrests with the restrictive conventions of a misogynistic society before finally breaking free through separation from the thinking world, via suicide in The Awakening and insanity in “The Yellow Wall-Paper.” Some would argue that the women themselves are flawed, through either mental instability or rampant libido, and thus the stories are skewed through ...


Crane And Chopin: Ideas Of Transformation, Vijay Jayaram '11 2010 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Crane And Chopin: Ideas Of Transformation, Vijay Jayaram '11

2010 Spring Semester

Though Stephen Crane’s Red Badge of Courage and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening are largely considered unrelated novels, they share one major idea: that of the failure of transformation. This is depicted in the respective evolutions of Crane’s Henry Fleming and Chopin’s Edna Pontellier, each of whom suffers a loss of identity in their respective awakenings. This idea is borne not out of imagination, but rather, the experiences of the authors themselves. Crane created Fleming to satirize his post-war world, while Chopin invented Edna to do the same in her sexually repressive society. Through the unsuccessful evolutions ...


The Possibility Of Female Autonomy In The Awakening And “The Yellow Wall-Paper”, Liana Nicklaus '10 2010 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

The Possibility Of Female Autonomy In The Awakening And “The Yellow Wall-Paper”, Liana Nicklaus '10

2010 Spring Semester

Both The Awakening by Kate Chopin and “The Yellow Wall-Paper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman present female main characters pursuing individual autonomy. At first, it would appear that both of these characters gain their freedom in the course of their respective stories. In The Awakening, Edna is able to escape from her husband into a new house, and pursue romantic interests with other men, and at the end of “The Yellow Wall-Paper,” the protagonist exclaims, “I’ve got out at last!” (Gilman 20). However, there are several elements in each piece which hint that liberation is not truly achievable. In actuality ...


Can We Really Make A Difference?, Michael Atten '12 2010 Illinois Math and Science Academy

Can We Really Make A Difference?, Michael Atten '12

2010 Spring Semester

Over the course of history, which type of person makes a bigger impact, an active manipulator fighting to stay alive or a passive observer floating along in the sea of life?

Slaughterhouse Five, by Kurt Vonnegut, and Maus, by Art Spiegelman, answered this question differently. Billy Pilgrim, the main character of Slaughterhouse Five, was so passive and uncaring about his fate that he effectively came “unstuck” in time. Conversely, Vladek Spiegelman of Maus put up a fight at every opportunity and never willingly traveled along in life. However, neither character made a difference on the events of the Second World ...


Puppies, Pearls, And Corpses On The Road: F. Scott Fitzgerald’S Treatment Of Women In The Great Gatsby, Eleanor Cory '12 2010 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Puppies, Pearls, And Corpses On The Road: F. Scott Fitzgerald’S Treatment Of Women In The Great Gatsby, Eleanor Cory '12

2010 Spring Semester

“…That’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool” (21). These are the words of Daisy Buchanan, a woman around whom the entire novel seems to revolve. Her story is one of a woman who loses her first love and instead marries a man who proved unfaithful and angry. Knowing that the story was written as a critique of society at the time, one might expect Daisy to eventually empower herself to leave this situation and escape the stereotype of the weak woman. The actual story could not be more different. In his ...


Washington's Tears: Sentimental Anecdote And Walt Whitman's Battle Of Long Island, Jason Stacy 2010 University of Iowa

Washington's Tears: Sentimental Anecdote And Walt Whitman's Battle Of Long Island, Jason Stacy

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Leypoldt, Gunter, Cultural Authority In The Age Of Whitman: A Transatlantic Perspective [Review], Sean Ross Meehan 2010 University of Iowa

Leypoldt, Gunter, Cultural Authority In The Age Of Whitman: A Transatlantic Perspective [Review], Sean Ross Meehan

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Back Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.4, 2010 University of Iowa

Back Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.4

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.4, 2010 University of Iowa

Front Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.4

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


“These Terrible 30 Or 40 Hours”: Washington At The Battle Of Brooklyn In Whitman’S “The Sleepers” And “Brooklyniana” Manuscripts, Kimberly Winschel Banion 2010 University of Iowa

“These Terrible 30 Or 40 Hours”: Washington At The Battle Of Brooklyn In Whitman’S “The Sleepers” And “Brooklyniana” Manuscripts, Kimberly Winschel Banion

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Genoways, Ted, Walt Whitman And The Civil War: America's Poet During The Lost Years Of 1860-1862 [Review], Michael Robertson 2010 University of Iowa

Genoways, Ted, Walt Whitman And The Civil War: America's Poet During The Lost Years Of 1860-1862 [Review], Michael Robertson

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Spring 2010, Ed Folsom 2010 University of Iowa

Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Spring 2010, Ed Folsom

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Whitman And The Proslavery Press: Newly Recovered 1860 Reviews, Eric Conrad 2010 University of Iowa

Whitman And The Proslavery Press: Newly Recovered 1860 Reviews, Eric Conrad

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Blackening The Blind Eye: 20th Century American Masculinity And Violence, Nikolas Griffith 2010 Carroll College, Helena, MT

Blackening The Blind Eye: 20th Century American Masculinity And Violence, Nikolas Griffith

Languages and Literature Undergraduate Theses

For too long the American male protagonist has been allowed to operate without appropriate questioning of the violence inherent in his actions. This paper will look to question just that. Critics such as Richard Slotkin have pointed out that the American fascination with violence began in the frontier and has continued to steadily develop1. Because of this, I will start with one of the most canonical texts of the American West, Owen Wister’s The Virginian. Moving up through the years, I will then integrate the question of race into that of violence with Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. The ...


Going No Place?: Foreground Nostalgia And Psychological Spaces In Wharton's The House Of Mirth, Sean Scanlan 2010 CUNY New York City College of Technology

Going No Place?: Foreground Nostalgia And Psychological Spaces In Wharton's The House Of Mirth, Sean Scanlan

Publications and Research

This essay argues that the power of Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth comes not from Lily Bart's function as a mere symptom of historical and economic pressures, but from the complex narrative and psychological process by which she negotiates a sequence of homes and their repeated collapse. Informing this process is nostalgia, a feeling that frames Lily Bart's step-by-step fall from riches to rags. Reading Lily via cognitive and family systems approaches suggests that Lily's rootlessness is predicated on a subtle transformation from her reliance upon simple “background” (aesthetic and monetary) nostalgia to a more ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress