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The Case Of Limbo: The Search For Identity In Sylvia Plath’S Short Fiction And The Bell Jar, Kristin Lyons 2020 East Tennessee State University

The Case Of Limbo: The Search For Identity In Sylvia Plath’S Short Fiction And The Bell Jar, Kristin Lyons

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Though Sylvia Plath’s poems and novel undergo frequent scholarly research, her short fiction is often overlooked. Plath’s journals influenced her short fiction writing, and her stories reflected Plath’s lived experiences. Plath’s short fiction, like her other works, explore themes of identity and detachment. Each of her protagonists exist in a personal limbo, and they strive to find their identities and to fit the roles in which they occupy. This thesis focuses on “Mary Ventura and the Ninth Kingdom,” stories from Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams, and additional research from scholarly journals and biographies, with ...


Exploring The Rhetorical Power Of Speculative Fiction Through Jewelle Gomez’S The Gilda Stories And Octavia Butler’S Fledgling, Monique Dixon 2020 California State University - San Bernardino

Exploring The Rhetorical Power Of Speculative Fiction Through Jewelle Gomez’S The Gilda Stories And Octavia Butler’S Fledgling, Monique Dixon

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

There are apparent similarities between Jewelle Gomez’s The Gilda Stories and Octavia Butler’s Fledgling. However, this thesis will demonstrate that they share more than similar subject matter and yet differ in substantial ways. Utilizing Black feminist theory and alternative rhetoric this thesis examines how Gomez and Butler harness the potential of speculative fiction to critique the world around them and imagine an alternative world for those who are intersectionally marginalized.


Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Ed Folsom 2020 University of Iowa

Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Ed Folsom

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Mark Doty. What Is The Grass: Walt Whitman In My Life, Matthew W. Miller 2020 Yeshiva University

Mark Doty. What Is The Grass: Walt Whitman In My Life, Matthew W. Miller

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, 2020 University of Iowa

Front Matter

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Back Matter, 2020 University of Iowa

Back Matter

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Whitman’S First-Person Plural, Alyson Brickey 2020 The University of Winnipeg

Whitman’S First-Person Plural, Alyson Brickey

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


A Newly Discovered 1849 Whitman Letter To The “Messrs. Merriam”, Madeline Kripke, Ed Folsom 2020 New York City

A Newly Discovered 1849 Whitman Letter To The “Messrs. Merriam”, Madeline Kripke, Ed Folsom

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


“Fit For War”: Rhythm And Bodily Health In Walt Whitman’S Drum-Taps, Jamie Fenton 2020 University of Cambridge

“Fit For War”: Rhythm And Bodily Health In Walt Whitman’S Drum-Taps, Jamie Fenton

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


A Syntactic Look Into Toni Morrison's Foreword Of Beloved, Natalie Marroquin 2020 University of North Georgia

A Syntactic Look Into Toni Morrison's Foreword Of Beloved, Natalie Marroquin

Project Beloved: The Past That Haunts Us

The attached infographic revolves around a fifty-word sentence from Toni Morrison's Beloved. I delve into Morrison's use of non-restrictive appositives and relative clauses to further the impact of her writing.


Linguistic Disobedience: Towards A Lyric Theory Of Intactness In Contemporary American Poetry, Saoirse . 2020 Washington College

Linguistic Disobedience: Towards A Lyric Theory Of Intactness In Contemporary American Poetry, Saoirse .

The Macksey Journal

Oxford English Dictionary

Intact, adj.

Definition: “Untouched; not affected by anything that injures, diminishes, or sullies; kept or left entire; unblemished; unimpaired”

Etymology: “Latin intactus, <in- [prefix expressing negation or privation] + tactus, past participle of tangĕre to touch”

To be intact – to be unbroken – is to be untouched. Theodore Adorno defines lyrical language as an expression of an individual’s personal subjectivity into universality through specific concepts and signs. However, to render a minoritized subject into a language designed to oppress them is to make that subjectivity lose its intactness. By bringing in Paul Ricoeur’s conception of the metaphor ...


What’S Love Got To Do With It? Romance, Capitalism, And Cruel Optimism From Pamela To Fifty Shades Of Grey, Caleigh Flegg 2020 Gettysburg College

What’S Love Got To Do With It? Romance, Capitalism, And Cruel Optimism From Pamela To Fifty Shades Of Grey, Caleigh Flegg

The Macksey Journal

The term “romance novel” might bring to mind a novel being half-heartedly shielded by a reader on a train, its cover bearing a man with long hair caressing a half-dressed woman. They are vulgar, atrociously written, an emblem of a culture that has become over-sexed and under-appreciative of good literature. Romance novels have been around for nearly as long as novels themselves, however; Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740)is an early example of the qualities every romance has to have—a meeting between the heroine and hero, an account of their attraction to each other, an obstacle that threatens their ...


Parodies And Distorted Shadows: Pseudo-Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale, Gina E. Mingoia 2020 Saint Joseph's College

Parodies And Distorted Shadows: Pseudo-Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale, Gina E. Mingoia

The Macksey Journal

Margaret Atwood founded a genre of female dystopia when she published The Handmaid’s Tale in 1985, but female does not always equate to feminist, and it certainly does not in this instance. This paper analyzes the ways in which The Handmaid’s Tale villainizes women through characterization, parallelism, motifs, and other elements, paying particular attention to Offred as well as the ways in which women – particularly Offred’s own activist mother and the violent, sadistic Aunts – are blamed for the Gileadean regime far more than any male character. In short, this paper will examine the ways in which The ...


Wide Thinking? What Is That?: The Critical Consciousness Of Tone In Margaret Atwood’S Hag-Seed, Ryan Ming-Yuan Lee 2020 Tufts University

Wide Thinking? What Is That?: The Critical Consciousness Of Tone In Margaret Atwood’S Hag-Seed, Ryan Ming-Yuan Lee

The Macksey Journal

This paper uses Margaret Atwood’s Hag-Seed (2016) as a case study in the political implications of literary affect. The hypothesis, which combines Helen Small’s quest to prove the “value of the humanities” with Paolo Freire’s “critical consciousness” pedagogy, is that literary tone can have progressive political weight. With Sianne Ngai’s works as a blueprint, I offer readings for three tonal areas in Atwood’s text: disgust, sympathy, and cuteness. I suggest that Atwood achieves real political ends by complicating the reader’s emotional experience of the novel and by articulating a concrete problem: incarceration stigma. The ...


A Hand Out In The Dark: Rethinking The Human In Ursula K. Le Guin’S “Nine Lives”, Syntyche Walker 2020 University of Washington, Tacoma

A Hand Out In The Dark: Rethinking The Human In Ursula K. Le Guin’S “Nine Lives”, Syntyche Walker

Access*: Interdisciplinary Journal of Student Research and Scholarship

The Science Fiction genre, according to pioneer Science Fiction scholar Darko Suvin, has the power to elucidate “future-bearing elements from the empirical environment”(Suvin 7). In her short story, “Nine Lives,” Ursula K. Le Guin uses the trope of human cloning to dissect the “future-bearing” potential of a cultural obsession with youth, beauty and perfection, suggesting that the future of this obsession, paired with scientific advances that render such perfectibility possible, is a future of spiritual starvation. Le Guin explores the gendered dichotomies of strength and weakness, the dark side of unity without dissent, and the futility of altruism without ...


Twenty-First Century Fear: Modern Anxiety As Expressed Through Post-Apocalyptic Literature, Dominique Dickey 2020 The Johns Hopkins University

Twenty-First Century Fear: Modern Anxiety As Expressed Through Post-Apocalyptic Literature, Dominique Dickey

The Macksey Journal

The recent popularity of post-apocalyptic literature has led to the development of two informal schools of thought. The first, supported by scholars and artists such as Anne Washburn and Frank Gaskill, is that post-apocalyptic literature serves as wish fulfillment. Reading impossible stories allows us to explore scenarios that may never happen, which satisfies a basic desire for adventure. The second school of thought, supported by Brian McDonald and Nirmala Nataraj, is that post-apocalyptic literature draws on reality; writing and reading these stories helps us to cope with actual catastrophes, which reveals a relationship between art and fear. McDonald adds that ...


Hot Dog Vs. Christian Fundamentalism In 1920s America, Nicole Orchosky 2020 University of Akron

Hot Dog Vs. Christian Fundamentalism In 1920s America, Nicole Orchosky

Student Projects from the Archives

Hot Dog: the Regular Fellow’s Monthly was a satirical magazine published by the Merit Publishing Company in Cleveland, Ohio throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Editor Jack Dinsmore included crudely humorous short stories and poems, images of scantily clad women, and editorials and opinion pieces offering his own commentary on current events. In the case of the December 1921 issue, Dinsmore offers scathing criticism of religious Prohibition supporters, namely Billy Sunday and Reverend John Roach Straton. This paper examines how an opinionated independent publication representative of its anti-Prohibition readership reacted to the Temperance Movement and subsequent outspoken Fundamentalist Christian figureheads.


T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, And Literary Tradition, Nicholas J. Odom 2020 University of Central Florida

T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, And Literary Tradition, Nicholas J. Odom

The Macksey Journal

T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound significantly influenced modernist poetry through publishing their respective poetic works as well as editing and promoting the work of fellow modernists and inspiring developments in 20th century Anglophone literary criticism like New Criticism. However, despite both poets’ prominence in Anglo-American modernist poetry, their shared interest in situating their works in literary tradition, and with special emphasis on the classical tradition, through erudite allusion distinguishes their understanding of “modernism” from that of other Anglo-American modernists like William Carlos Williams and Virginia Woolf. This article approaches Eliot’s and Pound’s participation in Anglo-American literary modernist ...


From Beowulf Through Virginia Woolf To The Coastal Wolves Of British Columbia: Animals, Interdisciplinarity And The Environmental Humanities, Pamela Banting 2020 University of Calgary

From Beowulf Through Virginia Woolf To The Coastal Wolves Of British Columbia: Animals, Interdisciplinarity And The Environmental Humanities, Pamela Banting

The Goose

Researching and teaching literary works about wild animals within the university system can present productive challenges both within and across disciplinary structures and conventions.


Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, And Maternal Power In The Novels Of Toni Morrison, Jonathan Garren 2020 Coker University

Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, And Maternal Power In The Novels Of Toni Morrison, Jonathan Garren

South Carolina Libraries

Jonathan Garren reviews Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison by Geneva Cobb Moore.


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